How to pull through cross strings without burning the mains?

Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
I've been wondering about this. I strung my racquet the other day and I noticed how warm my crosses were from friction with the mains. I know it's not healthy for the string.

Any tips on how to avoid this issue?
 

esgee48

Legend
Fan the cross when weaving; pull the string while maintaining the curve with finger; pull the string thru slowly i.e between 5-10 seconds. I have seen BB stringers pull the string thru the mains in 3 very quick pulls doing none of the above.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
Yes, fan them--don't simply pull straight across--there are several videos that will illustrate that technique. Good luck.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Fanning the mains as you pull the crosses is the answer,
but their is also poor fanning techniques (call it lazy fanning, people just going through the motions), which does nothing for the string, but rather just moves the burn spot further down the string bed
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I've been wondering about this. I strung my racquet the other day and I noticed how warm my crosses were from friction with the mains. I know it's not healthy for the string.

Any tips on how to avoid this issue?
What racket? What stringer? what pattern are you using?
 

1HBHNation

Rookie
Fanning the mains as you pull the crosses is the answer,
but their is also poor fanning techniques (call it lazy fanning, people just going through the motions), which does nothing for the string, but rather just moves the burn spot further down the string bed
I love your username, brother from anotha mother. Gotta keep us dying breeds alive! Allez Roger, Gasquet , Wawrinka, Dimitrov, Shapavalov , Lopez, and all them cats!
 

Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
Fanning the mains as you pull the crosses is the answer,
but their is also poor fanning techniques (call it lazy fanning, people just going through the motions), which does nothing for the string, but rather just moves the burn spot further down the string bed
Can you explain what the difference is between good and bad fanning?
 

jim e

Legend
Can you explain what the difference is between good and bad fanning?
Good is when you do not burn the mains on fanning.
Those that pull string very fast and does not fan a good distance can cause burning.
You should notice that if you do it wrong.
Once you have technique down you don't even give it much thought after a while.
Just pull string slow while fanning and there should be no issue.There are a number of videos online showing this.
I also string / weave one cross string ahead, and with the one ahead I also fan and pull most of the slack with that string as well before I tension previous cross string as to make less chance of wear on strings.
 

Wolfie1

New User
I like the following video for the classic example of 'bad' fanning (amongst many other bad practices). See the 22:15 mark.
He's just burning a groove higher up on the mains. No better than pulling straight across from grommet to grommet for the entire pull. Should be moving his fanning hand up and down as he pulls to not concentrate the friction.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Can you explain what the difference is between good and bad fanning?
If you hold the string in a V shape or just fan a few inches and pull the string through quickly you may as well not fan at all. Do your crosses heat up all the time or just on the top crosses? Also, what racket? What stringer? what pattern are you using?
 
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1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
The video that wolfie1 posted has both bad techniques that irvin mentioned, the "V", and the 1" or 2" fan.. both bad,
thruth be told, ive done them myself on a couple crosses, when feeling lazy; how about you!?
On some of his videos, ive seen richard parnell use bad technique a time or two, on one or a couple crosses, again he knows better, but just got lazy; no one is perfect 100% of the time
the point is, do it bad long enough and it will start to show
minimize bad technique and over time that will show as well
 

LOBALOT

Semi-Pro
I like the following video for the classic example of 'bad' fanning (amongst many other bad practices). See the 22:15 mark.
He's just burning a groove higher up on the mains. No better than pulling straight across from grommet to grommet for the entire pull. Should be moving his fanning hand up and down as he pulls to not concentrate the friction.
That video looked painful!

Can you imagine after a few racquets he will have burned a groove in his finger nails! Ouch!!!!
 

Wolfie1

New User
That video is an abomination.
I like the top YouTube comment for the video:

"Everything about this video annoys me."

He then gets piled on by others for his criticism.

Some times, I just like to watch it over again as some form of punishment.:D
 

Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
If you hold the string in a V shape or just fan a few inches and pull the string through quickly you may as well not fan at all. Do your crosses heat up all the time or just on the top crosses? Also, what racket? What stringer? what pattern are you using?
Yonex EZONE Ai 98, Alpha Axis Pro, and I am not sure what you mean by "pattern."
You can probably tell I have only recently started stringing....
 

jmnk

Hall of Fame
I like the following video for the classic example of 'bad' fanning (amongst many other bad practices). See the 22:15 mark.
He's just burning a groove higher up on the mains. No better than pulling straight across from grommet to grommet for the entire pull. Should be moving his fanning hand up and down as he pulls to not concentrate the friction.
this is not an example of 'bad fanning'. This is an example of 'not fanning'.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Yonex EZONE Ai 98, Alpha Axis Pro, and I am not sure what you mean by "pattern."
You can probably tell I have only recently started stringing....
Your machine is a lockout and due to the low tensions in your signature the tension should not be causing your problem. Your pattern is fairly open and because your using two piece you should be stringing 2 piece top down so there are no hard weaves like you would run into with ATW patterns.

I can think of a few reasons that would cause you cross string to have high friction.

1) You are pulling too fast and may or may not have been fanning your crosses ass you did. Slow down.

2) After stringing the mains and tying off you run in the crosses. Bad idea the cross could be pressed vy hard between the main and the grommet on the holes the mains skipped at 8 head. Preweaving the top crosses at least two may help in cutting down on the friction. Run those crosses in from the bottom up, if your're preweaving three crosses weave the 3rd, 2nd, then the top last. Then using the other end to string the remaining crosses after tying off the mains.

3) Gosen Micro is a fairly slick sting and with a poly cross the crosses are going to develop a smile with every cross you string. Trying to straighten the string wont help too much because the string will slide down hill (away from tensioned cross) so as you tension a string and tie off straighten the previously tension string. If you're pulling cross 6 straighten 5 and 4.

4) Weave one ahead, before you tension a cross you should have two cross ran in. The last main tensioned will always hold some string high and others low. If you're going over the high ones and under the low one you crosses will have a lot of friction. Let's say you have tensioned the 8th cross and you have the 9th cross ran in. Now you're ready to string the 10th cross, and if you 9th cross is a aligned straight across the mains it pull down the high strings and pulls up the low string. Pull that 9th cross all the way up against the 8th cross before weaving the 10th and you will have less friction. After weaving that cross don't just run the tip through so you can find the end of the string easily. Pull as much as you can through while its going under the high and over the low so you have only a loop large enough to reach the gripper.

5) When you get down near the bottom the string bed gets stiffer. I like to then only string one cross at a time and often that's all the string you have room for anyway. I then use a needle and thread method of weaving and pull the string all the way through as I go. Try to avoild any twisting as you weave. Those twists add friction. Pull weaving is a good thing to learn.

6) Use a good fanning technique and avoid pulling the string through too fast.

Good luck.

EDIT: If you string the same racket over and over take not of how much string you use for the crosses. Cut you string so it is long enough to reach the gripper on the last cross and no more. Pulling an extra 2' through the mains 19 times comes to and extra full set of string your pull just on the crosses and that a lot of friction on the mains.
 
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Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
3) Gosen Micro is a fairly slick sting and with a poly cross the crosses are going to develop a smile with every cross you string. Trying to straighten the string wont help too much because the string will slide down hill (away from tensioned cross) so as you tension a string and tie off straighten the previously tension string. If you're pulling cross 6 straighten 5 and 4.
I was wondering why the damn stuff wouldn't straighten. :p
 

Shroud

G.O.A.T.
I've been wondering about this. I strung my racquet the other day and I noticed how warm my crosses were from friction with the mains. I know it's not healthy for the string.

Any tips on how to avoid this issue?
Personally I use this method for all crosses. Takes a bit longer but I am not running a shop so its better to go slower and not hurt the string. Just using my tensions is damage enough :)

 

StringWeaver

New User
I've been wondering about this. I strung my racquet the other day and I noticed how warm my crosses were from friction with the mains. I know it's not healthy for the string.

Any tips on how to avoid this issue?
There are at least two tools on the market which greatly reduce friction when pulling the crosses. The StringWeaver and the Stringway MK2, both of which have been reviewed and discussed in other threads on this forum. These tools were also extensively tested and reviewed by a professional racquet technician who blogs about all things related to stringing. To see his reviews do a search on "Guts and Glory Tennis Blog".
Disclaimer: I am the inventor of the StringWeaver tool.
 
ladies and gentlemen stringers, get yourself a blunt awl, that is. from Babolat-very inexpensive- use this instead of your finger to force the cross strings to form the v on the racket face and go up and down a little when pulling crosses to minimize crosses burning and thread the largest number of crosses you can do- continue using awl on straightening string as the constant pull on your Babolat machine lets this hand free-buy Babolat and take care of it-buy more than one of the awls as they do get stolenBorrowed? Get the best Babolat you cannot afford-pays you back in time
 
ladies and gentlemen stringers, get yourself a blunt awl, that is. from Babolat-very inexpensive- use this instead of your finger to force the cross strings to form the v on the racket face and go up and down a little when pulling crosses to minimize crosses burning and thread the largest number of crosses you can do- continue using awl on straightening string as the constant pull on your Babolat machine lets this hand free-buy Babolat and take care of it-buy more than one of the awls as they do get stolenBorrowed? Get the best Babolat you cannot afford-pays you back in time
 
ladies and gentlemen stringers, get yourself a blunt awl, that is. from Babolat-very inexpensive- use this instead of your finger to force the cross strings to form the v on the racket face and go up and down a little when pulling crosses to minimize crosses burning and thread the largest number of crosses you can do- continue using awl on straightening string as the constant pull on your Babolat machine lets this hand free-buy Babolat and take care of it-buy more than one of the awls as they do get stolenBorrowed? Get the best Babolat you cannot afford-pays you back in time
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^Don't think so. Anyway, that is not a blunt awl. A blunt awl is also sometimes called a setting off awl or a setting off tool. See below:


 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
^^^Don't think so. Anyway, that is not a blunt awl. A blunt awl is also sometimes called a setting off awl or a setting off tool. See below:


 
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