How to schedule the gym and tennis?

A

anon10

Guest
How to schedule the gym and tennis.

I go the gym 4-5 times a week. I try to play tennis as often as I can in the week, usually between 2-5 times. My problem is that, like most people who go to a gym, I like to incorporate rest days. On these days my whole body is usually knackered. How am I supposed to fit tennis around going to the gym if you are supposed to rest your muscles afterwards?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

spritchard81

New User
I'll cut back on the gym time in the summer just because I can go out and play tennis almost every day. Then in the winter when there's no tennis, hit the gym hard. I don't know what part of the country you live in but if tennis is seasonal where you are I would recommend this.
 
A

anon10

Guest
I live in england but I have access to indoor courts. So I can play all year round.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

anon10

Guest
With that in mind, what would you suggest?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

jms007

Professional
Well really there is no way around it, you just gotta cut down on something. I'd suggest cutting down on gym time. I used to work out 4-5 times a week too, but now I find that unnecessary. If you're pleased with your muscle mass, I'd say 2-3 times a week is plenty. That's more than enough to sustain the muscle you have. I don't know what your work out schedule looks like, but since you go so often, I imagine you work alot of separate body parts. I'd cut out the isolating exercises (like biceps, triceps) since you kind of work them anyway when you work on your back and chest. Do more encompassing stuff, like chin-ups for example.
 
A

anon10

Guest
I'm not an expert on gym routines. I just do upper body one day then lower body the next.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

jms007

Professional
I'm not an expert on gym routines. I just do upper body one day then lower body the next. With this in mind, would you suggest I change my routine?

That depends on what your goal with working out is.
But Yeah, if you want go less often, change it up. Like said, do more basic core exercises like squats, bench press and pull-ups. Simplify and focus on the bigger muscle groups. You'll work the small ones automatically anyway. That's what I do at least.
 

TnTBigman

Professional
You can lighten your load by doing one muscle group (2-3 different exercises) per day. eg Biceps Triceps Mondays, Cardio Tuesdays, Abs-Core Wednesdays, Chest+Back Thursdays, Legs Fridays, Rest Saturdays, and restart the cycle on Sunday. This way you'll get your gym exercise in, as wll as not feel to tired or prone to injury when exerting yourself on the courts.
My schedule is like this with gym in the mornings and I haven't skipped a session.
 

Gemini

Hall of Fame
It's been mentioned but I tend to cut back on my gym days in the Summer when I'm doing most of my playing. I usually on get 2-3 days a week in the gym from June to October as I've determined these are the max number of days I can work out and still be fully rested for tennis and vice versa.
 
A

anon10

Guest
You can lighten your load by doing one muscle group (2-3 different exercises) per day. eg Biceps Triceps Mondays, Cardio Tuesdays, Abs-Core Wednesdays, Chest+Back Thursdays, Legs Fridays, Rest Saturdays, and restart the cycle on Sunday. This way you'll get your gym exercise in, as wll as not feel to tired or prone to injury when exerting yourself on the courts.
My schedule is like this with gym in the mornings and I haven't skipped a session.

If you were to play tennis on the tuesday, wouldn't your arms be aching from doing biceps/ triceps? And, aren't you supposed to rest a muscle for 48 hours after the gym? Which would include playing sports wouldn't it?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

FastFreddy

Semi-Pro
Gym time

I would lift on days you don't play tennis. When I played four times a week 3hrs per day( Tues, Thurs, Sat , Sun) I would just lift twice a week 5 movements for 15 sets for strength.( bench press, clean and press, stepups, deadlift, bentover row) I would ride the bike for 1hr everyday to keep up my cardio for tennis. Jump rope before you play to warm up and get your feet moving, good for timing too.
 

Itagaki

Semi-Pro
You could cut down on gym time by trying out a 3-day total body program.

Examples are Starting Strength or Stronglifts 5x5

These workouts focus on using the biggest muscle groups, only takes 3 days out of your week, and if you start out light the entire workout will probably take under an hour.

As for scheduling it with tennis, pick your priority. If tennis is the number one thing you should do that first on a day that has both lifting and tennis on it, if weights are more important then do that first. Lifting and playing tennis on the same day are not necessarily a bad thing if you do a 3 day program, it will allow you to maximize recovery time.

Of course nothing works out perfectly and im sure you'll have tennis on days in between.
 
A

anon10

Guest
Yes, this is the problem. I have no problems playing tennis before I go the gym. As mentioned, I play up to 5 times a week.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
A

anon10

Guest
I am still new to the gym and have never lifted weights. Wouldn't I be failing to get the full benefits for my fitness if I only focused on core muscles?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Power Player

Bionic Poster
You are new to the gym but in your first post you said you go 4-5 times a week. Well of course you are going to be "knackered". You simply are not used to this at all yet. It is going to take some time, so be patient. I lift 3x a week. I have to do it at noon, since I have a job. So I lift at lunch and some days play tennis around 5 hours later. It can be pretty exhausting, but you can adapt to it and it gets easier.
 
A

anon10

Guest
Like you say, maybe I will get better at the two the better I am at the gym.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

polski

Semi-Pro
Yes, your body will take 4-6 weeks to get used to your new routine. Once it does, playing tennis after a gym workout is no big deal.

I do a 30-40 minute routine in the mornings of weights. I alternate upper (M/W/F) & lower body (T/Th/Sa) and do a little core work every day. I play tennis 2-3 days per week in the evenings & I have no fatigue issues.

I have thought about skipping the gym on days that I have league matches, but it really doesn't make a difference to me anymore. If I play in a tournament I skip the gym on Saturday, but usually not Friday.
 

polski

Semi-Pro
I am still new to the gym and have never lifted weights. Wouldn't I be failing to get the full benefits for my fitness If I only focused on core muscles.

Core strength is where it all starts. If you don't have a strong core, everything else is a waste. You will notice a big difference in your game when your core gets stronger.
 

vkartikv

Hall of Fame
Depends on what you do in the gym - cardio or weights. This is what I do to keep everything comfortably apart from each other:
Cardio (Sprints/plyometrics/stairmaster) Mon/Wed/Sat
Weights Sun/Thu
Tennis Tue/Fri

I keep changing the routines to keep my body guessing and take a day off every 3 weeks. Of course, it is hard to find someone to play with, as it is, so I may have to mix things up to not do too many things on one day and feel the soreness the next day.
 

TnTBigman

Professional
If you were to play tennis on the tuesday, wouldn't your arms be aching from doing biceps/ triceps? And, aren't you supposed to rest a muscle for 48 hours after the gym, which would include playing sports wouldn't it?

As is, the schedule above, each body part worked out for that day has 5-6 days of rest till it's next workout. I've been doing this schedule (heavy load, low volume) for about 5 years, and I workout around lunch time (45 mins) then play tennis at 6pm the same day. Honestly, I ache more (left shoulder, lowerback, ankles, feet) after tennis than after the gym- and I don't feel tired for tennis. I only get sore after workouts if I take a 1-2 week complete break away from the weights. The soreness only lasts for the starting back week and I'm normal after.
When new to the strength training or fitness scene, you tend to take "advice" literally. But as years pass by and you notice what your body resposnes best to (time of exercising and type), you won't be afraid to go against the norm.
 
Top