How to train a child to become a world class player...

There in lies the problem with the ranking system. Roy Lederman is a nice little player, but no where close to a top player. The problem with his record is that the boys he is playing also have rankings that do not mean squat. So the inflated illusions just compound themselves.

The level of Lederman, and those ranked above him in the USTAs, are light years away from a Bernard Tomic at 12-13 or a Donald Young at 12-13.

Brad, you say your goal is world class. You are wasting your time then with the USTA stuff. If you want to know where your son stands, he has to hit with the best international boys. Until you see him hit with the very best international boys, any conclusions you are drawing about his potential are irrelevant.

Professional men's tennis is dominated by non Americans....so why would results against only American boys tell you anything at all? Why would a ranking in California even matter?

How many boys from Spain has your son played? Russia? Serbia? Switzerland? France? Great Britain? Argentina? Until he does you don't have anything to go on in regards to world class potential.

Right now there are 100 boys in Russia who are 12-14 years old, tall, fast as lightening, strong...battling each other every day for every scrap. They made the cut from 20000 who tried out. They are playing for their survival. Same with Serbia. There are boys just as tall as your son, but with muscular legs like grown men. They can lift 3 times what he could, run faster, and are solely focused on being the best, school be damned. That is the reality of the competition, not Roy Lederman.

Any results vs USTA ranked boys will not tell you a darn thing about your boys pro potential. You are living in a fish bowl compared to the huge ocean of players that are coming.
i agree with you ,the plan is the ITF unfortunately deiton is a year off before we can play itf's , he just turned 12 and were all ready looking at working on playing some of the Europe tourneys when he reaches 13 and if he continues to grow will play some futures also ,right now time and size is what were waiting on!!
 

flowrider

New User
flowrider, I have also seen Roy play several times. Like I said, nice little player.

But like my last post said, tennis is not America's game anymore. A group of coaches I met at a seminar took a tour of Russia, Serbia, and then over to Spain. The videos they took show what is coming and it is jaw dropping.

There are young boys whose speed would amaze you. These boy's shots would literally rip the racquet out of Roy Lederman's hand. I'm talking an army of Nadal's, the next generation which will be even stronger and faster.

And you will never hear of almost all of them, only the top few will emerge.

The USTA and the tennis parents on this forum have absolutely no clue what is coming. We live in a bubble.
Absolutely, agree!!!
 

Tom C

Rookie
flowrider, I have also seen Roy play several times. Like I said, nice little player.

But like my last post said, tennis is not America's game anymore. A group of coaches I met at a seminar took a tour of Russia, Serbia, and then over to Spain. The videos they took show what is coming and it is jaw dropping.

There are young boys whose speed would amaze you. These boy's shots would literally rip the racquet out of Roy Lederman's hand. I'm talking an army of Nadal's, the next generation which will be even stronger and faster.

And you will never hear of almost all of them, only the top few will emerge.

The USTA and the tennis parents on this forum have absolutely no clue what is coming. We live in a bubble.
Ok, so what are these boy's doing to get to that level?
 

flowrider

New User
flowrider, I have also seen Roy play several times. Like I said, nice little player.

But like my last post said, tennis is not America's game anymore. A group of coaches I met at a seminar took a tour of Russia, Serbia, and then over to Spain. The videos they took show what is coming and it is jaw dropping.

There are young boys whose speed would amaze you. These boy's shots would literally rip the racquet out of Roy Lederman's hand. I'm talking an army of Nadal's, the next generation which will be even stronger and faster.

And you will never hear of almost all of them, only the top few will emerge.

The USTA and the tennis parents on this forum have absolutely no clue what is coming. We live in a bubble.
TennisCoach, what about the girls. I notice that Madison Keys and Sachia, are pretty much at the top of their age group even among international players.
 
Ok, so what are these boy's doing to get to that level?
Tom, its starts with the selection process. Tennis is viewed as a way out in Russia and Serbia. Pretty much every athletic kid in Serbia and Russia can be funneled towards tennis. The little towns funnel to the regions which funnel to the national program.

So they start with only the best possible raw materials.

Imagine if America...or even just California or Florida... took all the best athletic kids. Your kids that are dunking at 10 years old. Your kids that are throwing 80 miles a hour at 12. Your kids who run the fastest. All those amazing football skill position boys from every top school program.

You take all of them and teach them tennis and weed out the best athletes that also show the most tennis aptitude.

That is never going to happen...but that is what we are competing against.
 
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TennisCoach, what about the girls. I notice that Madison Keys and Sachia, are pretty much at the top of their age group even among international players.
Sachia is an elite athlete. She could play any sport she chooses...we are lucky her mother put her into tennis. Madison Keys is the shining star of Evert's.

Now imagine if we could have 1000 Sachia Vickery's battling it out across America to see which few get to the pros!
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
The USTA and the tennis parents on this forum have absolutely no clue what is coming. We live in a bubble.
What is it that we and the USTA are doing differently?

Just throwing a few naive questions/ideas out there...

How are they training them differently? Are they just hungrier (I think a recent Tennis magazine article mentioned how much hungrier non-US players are). Do they feed them differently? (joke!)

Seems that the USTA have been concentrating more on how to keep young kids interested, and this is partly by making tennis quick and easy to learn (eg. quick start tennis). I think part of this pressure to keep kids interested any way we can, is that these days they have so many different distractions to choose from. Do other countries have this issue (if indeed this is an issue).

Would love some more detailed ideas.
 
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D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
Seems the latter part of my post (other countries can funnel many more of their athletes into just tennis), was answered prior to submitting my questions :)
 
What is it that we and the USTA are doing differently?

Just throwing a few naive questions/ideas out there...

How are they training them differently? Are they just hungrier (I think a recent Tennis magazine article mentioned how much hungrier non-US players are). Do they feed them differently? (joke!)

Seems that the USTA have been concentrating more on how to keep young kids interested, and this is partly by making tennis quick and easy to learn (eg. quick start tennis). I think part of this pressure to keep kids interested any way we can, is that these days they have so many different distractions to choose from. Do other countries have this issue (if indeed this is an issue).

Would love some more detailed ideas.

-d
I think it is simple, with a few exceptions, the best athletic boys in America are playing football, baseball, and basketball. The best athletes in Spain are playing soccer or tennis. The best athletic kids in Russia and Serbia are playing tennis.

Like you said, our kids have lots of distractions. Realistic video games, cell phones at 5 years old, chat rooms, 500 cable stations and on and on.

If America's best athletes choose tennis, we could be the best again. But I go to my local high school and look at the football team, the basketball team, the baseball team and see the elite athletes. I go see the tennis team and see a few athletes, but mostly kids who are moderate athletes who have just hit lots of balls. So they can win in school and in USTA's but don't stand a chance vs the internationals.

Take every NBA and NFL skill position player. If they had all played tennis from age 5 instead of basketball or football, and we weeded out the best tennis players from all of them, I think we would have quite a few in the top 100.
 
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PimpMyGame

Hall of Fame
In response to the original question:

I don't think you can train a child to be a world class player. If the ability isn't in his/her DNA there's nothing you can do about it.

What we're seeing in Europe is the result of national infrastructure, it's not that Serbia, Russia, France or Spain have better DNA (although the thoughts on escaping poverty are, I think, an additional factor). There is enough resource in these places to look at all the kids at school, and eventually stream them into the sports they are best at. If you don't have the infrastructure program in place now your country will miss out for the next 15 years. Which is why Andy Murray had to move to Spain as a tennager (14 I think).

It's not that there is more talent in other countries, but it's about channeling that talent. What hasn't been mentioned is that 95% of these "amazing" youngsters will fall by the wayside before getting to pro level. Some natural wastage, but also some who won't make the grade - that's how competitive it is.

And then you have the UK and our tennis association - the LTA. What a joke. Everything is extremely haphazard, no help from the state for the coaches or the parents, and if little Johnny's dad doesn't earn much money and/or can't get him out to the few and far between tourneys then there is no chance. There is plenty of talent out there that will never be found, alas!
 
In response to the original question:

I don't think you can train a child to be a world class player. If the ability isn't in his/her DNA there's nothing you can do about it.

What we're seeing in Europe is the result of national infrastructure, it's not that Serbia, Russia, France or Spain have better DNA (although the thoughts on escaping poverty are, I think, an additional factor). There is enough resource in these places to look at all the kids at school, and eventually stream them into the sports they are best at. If you don't have the infrastructure program in place now your country will miss out for the next 15 years. Which is why Andy Murray had to move to Spain as a tennager (14 I think).

It's not that there is more talent in other countries, but it's about channeling that talent. What hasn't been mentioned is that 95% of these "amazing" youngsters will fall by the wayside before getting to pro level. Some natural wastage, but also some who won't make the grade - that's how competitive it is.

And then you have the UK and our tennis association - the LTA. What a joke. Everything is extremely haphazard, no help from the state for the coaches or the parents, and if little Johnny's dad doesn't earn much money and/or can't get him out to the few and far between tourneys then there is no chance. There is plenty of talent out there that will never be found, alas!
Brilliant post! You summed up every point I was trying to make but with much more clarity. Nice job.

In America, we can take it a step further and say that our best kids are indeed found and streamed to sports...but to football, basketball, and baseball. The infrastructure of youth basketball for example is amazing. Kids are found at 5-6 and youth basketball/AAU/Nike takes it from there all the way to the pros.
 
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D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I think it is simple, the best athletic boys in America are playing football, baseball, and basketball. The best athletes in Spain are playing soccer or tennis. The best athletic kids in Russia and Serbia are playing tennis.

Like you said, our kids have lots of distractions. Realistic video games, cell phones at 5 years old, chat rooms, 500 cable stations and on and on.

If America's best athletes choose tennis, we could be the best again. But I go to my local high school and look at the football team, the basketball team, the baseball team and see the athletes. I go see the tennis team and see a few athletes but mostly kids who are moderate athletes who have just hit lots of balls. So they can win in school and in USTA's but don't stand a chance vs the internationals.
I actually wanted to come up with a program that would entice my kids/nephews to stay with tennis.

I'm a huge tennis fan, and tennis has taught me so much about myself, people and life in many areas outside just the tennis game. I was hoping to pass on the gift of tennis to my kids/nephew, for all the things I was able to get out of the sport, but also because it would be something I'd be able to share with them even through my golden years. Looking around at the parks/tennis clubs nearby, if I was a kid, I don't think I'd want to play tennis either... ie. seeing a field of 10-13 kids playing baseball or soccer is way more appealing than a a private 1-1. The other obstacle (as a parent) is the cost of taking lessons as a kid (ie. going to a private club or taking lessons). Baseball and soccer seem to be "cheap" sports run by volunteer parents... Whereas tennis is either cost prohibitive, or less socially appealing.

I have been considering starting an inexpensive program for kids my children's/nephew's age (currently 2 and 3 year olds). I do have a selfish agenda, ie. to make the game more socially appealing (with the hopes my kids/nephews would stick with it). Not sure how I plan to run it, but definitely the top 2 criteria are 1) cheap (ie. 1-2 cans of balls a class to start as toddlers?) and 2) mandatory parent involvement (not sure how i'll work that out). I would love to get people's feedback. Maybe during toddler years come up with a ladder system by category (ie. best forehand, best backhand, etc...). Would be cool to create a travel tennis team (like baseball/soccer) to play other kids in other areas (ie. USTA tourneys can be overly expensive), but I'd probably have to have me run the teams myself :p

Obviously I'm not trying build world class athletes.. but maybe if I can get something like this off the ground, and other tennis parents were able to in other areas, tennis might take a step closer to attracting a large pool of athletes.
 

PimpMyGame

Hall of Fame
Brilliant post! You summed up every point I was trying to make but with much more clarity. Nice job.

In America, we can take it a step further and say that our best kids are indeed found and streamed to sports...but to football, basketball, and baseball. The infrastructure of youth basketball for example is amazing. Kids are found at 5-6 and youth basketball/AAU/Nike takes it from there all the way to the pros.
Thank you. Clearly it's a money thing at the end of the day, and there's more chance of going pro at the sports you mention. A little like football (soccer) in the UK. Heck, you've probably got more chance of going pro at darts or snooker than you have at tennis or golf! Crazy world of sports!
 

SoCal10s

Hall of Fame
I think it is simple, with a few exceptions, the best athletic boys in America are playing football, baseball, and basketball. The best athletes in Spain are playing soccer or tennis. The best athletic kids in Russia and Serbia are playing tennis.

Like you said, our kids have lots of distractions. Realistic video games, cell phones at 5 years old, chat rooms, 500 cable stations and on and on.

If America's best athletes choose tennis, we could be the best again. But I go to my local high school and look at the football team, the basketball team, the baseball team and see the elite athletes. I go see the tennis team and see a few athletes, but mostly kids who are moderate athletes who have just hit lots of balls. So they can win in school and in USTA's but don't stand a chance vs the internationals.

Take every NBA and NFL skill position player. If they had all played tennis from age 5 instead of basketball or football, and we weeded out the best tennis players from all of them, I think we would have quite a few in the top 100.


True, but I think the overall influence is really money $$$ .To get better in tennis you need a lot of $$$ . No one that knows anything about tennis is going to teach you for free...Tournament cost big $$$ to play... You need another person to practice with.. Almost any other sport,a kid can go out there and get somewhat good and a scout will see them and recruit them and put them through somekind of free program... even golf,one can get good by just hitting a tons of golf balls and work at a driving range and play free...You can't do that in tennis,not in America at least ...
That's why the Williams sisters are the most unique in all sports. Tiger Woods,is pale in comparison to what the Williams did... To get to the top of tennis with no $$$ and just from the teachings of the dad's and to have 2 great champions with almost totally different forms in their play...
So maybe the factor here is just tremendous work ethic , dicipline,desire and litlle bit of brain washing ....
 

Tom C

Rookie
Tom, its starts with the selection process. Tennis is viewed as a way out in Russia and Serbia. Pretty much every athletic kid in Serbia and Russia can be funneled towards tennis. The little towns funnel to the regions which funnel to the national program.

So they start with only the best possible raw materials.

Imagine if America...or even just California or Florida... took all the best athletic kids. Your kids that are dunking at 10 years old. Your kids that are throwing 80 miles a hour at 12. Your kids who run the fastest. All those amazing football skill position boys from every top school program.

You take all of them and teach them tennis and weed out the best athletes that also show the most tennis aptitude.

That is never going to happen...but that is what we are competing against.
I did a "Star Search" program with the USTA/Eastern Section... We mailed letters to all the grammar schools in Brooklyn, inviting all children in 2nd and 3rd grade down to the facility to do physical tests (sprint, jump rope, overhand throw, hexagon, ect...)... we calculated the results and gave 4 children, full 14 week scholarships... these children need not have had tennis experience, just athletic ability... 1 child had no tennis experience and is as good as some children that have played over a year... 2 children have progressed rapidly and the 4th is doing well...
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I did a "Star Search" program with the USTA/Eastern Section... We mailed letters to all the grammar schools in Brooklyn, inviting all children in 2nd and 3rd grade down to the facility to do physical tests (sprint, jump rope, overhand throw, hexagon, ect...)... we calculated the results and gave 4 children, full 14 week scholarships... these children need not have had tennis experience, just athletic ability... 1 child had no tennis experience and is as good as some children that have played over a year... 2 children have progressed rapidly and the 4th is doing well...
Just curious, what happens at the end of the 14 weeks?
 
J

Julieta

Guest
I did a "Star Search" program with the USTA/Eastern Section... We mailed letters to all the grammar schools in Brooklyn, inviting all children in 2nd and 3rd grade down to the facility to do physical tests (sprint, jump rope, overhand throw, hexagon, ect...)... we calculated the results and gave 4 children, full 14 week scholarships... these children need not have had tennis experience, just athletic ability... 1 child had no tennis experience and is as good as some children that have played over a year... 2 children have progressed rapidly and the 4th is doing well...

At my high school, which was actually a poor school, they had "elite gym" which involved coaches doing experiments on us. It was actually a lot of fun. They must have been doing something right because out of that school we produced a top NFL player, several MLB players, top 50 WTA, a couple of guys that made it to the NBA and also one of the top women's basketball players.

The downside is that I had to take college algebra three times.
 

xnarek

Rookie
probably so...but look at the odds theres like a 1/1000 chance he'll go pro in tennis, so whats left? the real world.


it reminds me of the NCAA comercial. "theres XXX amount of ncaa athletes, and the majority will go pro in somethin rother than sports


but back on topic...anyone else have any good "ideas" on how to get a little kid to be a world class player ?
It really depends, i dont think the chances are that low if you started at the right time, play a lot, like the sport and are motivated. At that rate, it would be a 1/2 chance of becoming pro. Injuries might be the best reason why people like that dont become pro.

And dont push ur child.
i see a kid thats good at the sport but cries a lot(male)
and a kid that smilies everytime he plays
 
What is it that we and the USTA are doing differently?

Just throwing a few naive questions/ideas out there...

How are they training them differently? Are they just hungrier (I think a recent Tennis magazine article mentioned how much hungrier non-US players are). Do they feed them differently? (joke!)

Seems that the USTA have been concentrating more on how to keep young kids interested, and this is partly by making tennis quick and easy to learn (eg. quick start tennis). I think part of this pressure to keep kids interested any way we can, is that these days they have so many different distractions to choose from. Do other countries have this issue (if indeed this is an issue).

Would love some more detailed ideas.

just a thought on this, we recieved a letter from the usta for my son to join one of the national coaches and the class of 94-95 (age group)for a week of and this is how it was worded 'FUN AND SOME COMPETITIVE TENNIS " showed my son the letter and scratched off the word "fun" told him when he got over there he was to listen to the coach and work hard ,instucted him that he wasn't to be talking during any of the workouts only on the breaks that also means when he's picking up the balls for the coach no talking get the job done, ive seen the ITF kids their hunger and business like attitude is very evident!!
 

flowrider

New User
At my high school, which was actually a poor school, they had "elite gym" which involved coaches doing experiments on us. It was actually a lot of fun. They must have been doing something right because out of that school we produced a top NFL player, several MLB players, top 50 WTA, a couple of guys that made it to the NBA and also one of the top women's basketball players.

The downside is that I had to take college algebra three times.
Wow. Which HS is that?
 
J

Julieta

Guest
just a thought on this, we recieved a letter from the usta for my son to join one of the national coaches and the class of 94-95 (age group)for a week of and this is how it was worded 'FUN AND SOME COMPETITIVE TENNIS " showed my son the letter and scratched off the word "fun" told him when he got over there he was to listen to the coach and work hard ,instucted him that he wasn't to be talking during any of the workouts only on the breaks that also means when he's picking up the balls for the coach no talking get the job done, ive seen the ITF kids their hunger and business like attitude is very evident!!
I do think if you want to be the best, its not going to be fun per se! But then hardcore training can be fun for some kids...some kids just love to train. Sometimes people attack parents when it is the kid who wants to play 24/7.

I think that the most important thing is to not let the kid get away with glitchy strokes. Then of course the fitness is a given. But the shots have to be perfect. It also depends on the goals. I think the path of going pro is different than playing for a college spot as well. Too much money spent trying to impress in the juniors can mean less money to travel to futures etc. later on down the road.
 
J

Julieta

Guest
Wow. Which HS is that?
I don't want to say...sorry...this was in the 80s anyway. I think they did a lot of this stuff because of the demographics, we had a good cross section of types of kids. I dont know how long they continued with it because a lot of people were unhappy that the kids were doing so many hours of gym class and only needing one math credit to graduate!
 
I do think if you want to be the best, its not going to be fun per se! But then hardcore training can be fun for some kids...some kids just love to train. Sometimes people attack parents when it is the kid who wants to play 24/7.

I think that the most important thing is to not let the kid get away with glitchy strokes. Then of course the fitness is a given. But the shots have to be perfect. It also depends on the goals. I think the path of going pro is different than playing for a college spot as well. Too much money spent trying to impress in the juniors can mean less money to travel to futures etc. later on down the road.
when i was training i would work so hard i would get sick to my stomach quite often ,when i was on the mat with some bruiser who out weighd me by 40 pounds or more and he was working me "no fun" ,once i turned it and made him "tap out" as they call it. and it was over then you would see me smile that was the fun part "the victory"!! everything in between was grueling!!

i tell my son "you have to learn to love working out "
 
J

Julieta

Guest
when i was training i would work so hard i would get sick to my stomach quite often ,when i was on the mat with some bruiser who out weighd me by 40 pounds or more and he was working me "no fun" ,once i turned it and made him "tap out" as they call it. and it was over then you would see me smile that was the fun part "the victory"!! everything in between was grueling!!

i tell my son "you have to learn to love working out "
Great story and very true! You have to love it. It sounds like your son does though. So were you a wrestler?
 
boxed and grappled "mma" is what its known as now, wish i would'nt have
I hear that Brad. My brother and I boxed from 15-19 at a gym in Phila. Still have repercussions from it, headaches, some blurring. Nasty, nasty sport. For every guy who makes any money there are thousands and thousands who only end up with the ill effects.
 
I grew up with fighters...I've met some interesting characters for sure.

That and tennis are the toughest sports IMO.
they just shoved a needle in my back yesterday into c5/c6 area, a steroid shot, the area was inflamed and it hurt so bad ,feeling better today though think it helped some!!
 

Jonas

Semi-Pro
I hear that. We are fortunate to have the largest public red clay facility right down the road from us. 12 red clay courts!

Our kids are going to spend at least half their training time getting dirty.
Hey TennisCoach,
Where is that located in FLA?
Thanks and I am really enjoying the insight on this thread...
 
Ok, let's hear the ideas and let's work together...
Begins with the Athletic child. Find the coach who has done this before. Don't listen to someone who has not been down the path (TCF). Find sponsors who can help you fund the European matches and ITF tennis. Hard Work and lots of support from the family!
 
Begins with the Athletic child. Find the coach who has done this before. Don't listen to someone who has not been down the path (TCF). Find sponsors who can help you fund the European matches and ITF tennis. Hard Work and lots of support from the family!
Lets see, I worked for Macci for several years and studied his methods daily. He helped develop the Williams sisters, Capriati, and Roddick. Thats 4 number 1 players.

And the list of the number one players your coach has worked with includes??

Please enlighten us all to why you took your kid to France rather than work with Macci or Bollettieri or Evert or Saddlebrook. Those coaches/academies have had a hand somewhere in the development of many top players. Surely one of them could see the potential that Mr. French saw, after all they have developed many more top players than he has. Hmmm, perhaps Mr. French is a businessman who thinks he can get some free publicity using the American media....and he really is smart enough to know that you can not tell squat about a 5 year old? Geez, now that would mean he was just as smart as Lansdorp, Macci, Nick B., Evert and the others...and is just using your ego to try and gain something.
 
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Lets see, I worked for Macci for several years and studied his methods daily. He helped develop the Williams sisters, Capriati, and Roddick. Thats 4 number 1 players.

And the list of the number one players your coach has worked with includes??

Please enlighten us all to why you took your kid to France rather than work with Macci or Bollettieri or Evert or Saddlebrook. Those coaches/academies have had a hand somewhere in the development of many top players. Surely one of them could see the potential that Mr. French saw, after all they have developed many more top players than he has.
Rick Macci's janitor sweeping around the courts also worked for him for several years. Can he claim also. to have coached the Williams sisters, Capriati, and Roddick. I work for microsoft can I claim any of Bill gates accomplishments? In 35 years of coaching can you tell us just one of the kids you trained from the start to Pros? I know there are many right? Just name one. Go ahead we will wait...................Come on there must be one..........
35 years and not one? I am in shock.:shock: To quote a great man whom just past away. TCFL "You don't know DIDDILY"
 
J

Julieta

Guest
Lets see, I worked for Macci for several years and studied his methods daily. He helped develop the Williams sisters, Capriati, and Roddick. Thats 4 number 1 players.

And the list of the number one players your coach has worked with includes??

Please enlighten us all to why you took your kid to France rather than work with Macci or Bollettieri or Evert or Saddlebrook. Those coaches/academies have had a hand somewhere in the development of many top players. Surely one of them could see the potential that Mr. French saw, after all they have developed many more top players than he has. Hmmm, perhaps Mr. French is a businessman who thinks he can get some free publicity using the American media....and he really is smart enough to know that you can not tell squat about a 5 year old? Geez, now that would mean he was just as smart as Lansdorp, Macci, Nick B., Evert and the others...and is just using your ego to try and gain something.

I think one thing in the favor of France is that they really love tennis over there. The FFT is very supportive of the players. A friend of mine who isn't even a French national got severely hurt in a tournament and the FFT offered to pick up the expenses. I do like the academies in the States, I think IMG, Maaci etc. do a great job dont get me wrong and I do think there are a lot of great coaches over here that aren't affilated with any of the academies as well. But I think that the USTA could use some improvements and the fact that the sport is just not as big here makes a difference.
 
I think one thing in the favor of France is that they really love tennis over there. The FFT is very supportive of the players. A friend of mine who isn't even a French national got severely hurt in a tournament and the FFT offered to pick up the expenses. I do like the academies in the States, I think IMG, Maaci etc. do a great job dont get me wrong and I do think there are a lot of great coaches over here that aren't affilated with any of the academies as well. But I think that the USTA could use some improvements and the fact that the sport is just not as big here makes a difference.
the usta was trying to work a deal with lansthorp last year ,what happen i dont know! he didn't come on and "MY" guess is his style he's all business he works the kids hard doesn't smile to much "will" throw you off the court if you dont do it his way ""thats right the kids dont a say in the matter""and from what ive heard has a foul mouth . I dont care for the foul mouth but the rest would be a great addition to the program!! i like the guy
 
J

Julieta

Guest
the usta was trying to work a deal with lansthorp last year ,what happen i dont know! he didn't come on and "MY" guess is his style he's all business he works the kids hard doesn't smile to much "will" throw you off the court if you dont do it his way ""thats right the kids dont a say in the matter""and from what ive heard has a foul mouth . I dont care for the foul mouth but the rest would be a great addition to the program!! i like the guy
That is interesting! I did not know that. A lot of the best coaches would not win any popularity contests. They arent into the feel good factor of just praising the kids. You want to somehow develop confidence but not entitlement. It's hard!
 

GRANITECHIEF

Hall of Fame
Yeah, he basically told them that he didn't want to do paperwork, didn't want to do press conference, wasn't going to baby the kids and was going to teach his way, without coddling.

USTA wouldn't concede and neither would he, so he's still teaching at a private residence next to a fountain.
 
Yeah, he basically told them that he didn't want to do paperwork, didn't want to do press conference, wasn't going to baby the kids and was going to teach his way, without coddling.

USTA wouldn't concede and neither would he, so he's still teaching at a private residence next to a fountain.
Good for him , he knows what hes doing , and that sounds about right.
 
Yeah, he basically told them that he didn't want to do paperwork, didn't want to do press conference, wasn't going to baby the kids and was going to teach his way, without coddling.

USTA wouldn't concede and neither would he, so he's still teaching at a private residence next to a fountain.
Where is the fountain? Would love to talk to him.
 
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