How to use the starting clamp

#1
I just bought a starting clamp... But now I realize I am not sure how to use it. Is it only to start the crosses? I thought so... But I always do a two piece stringing, so I always do a starting knot for the crosses, making the use of the starting clamp redundant. It's actually being useful when starting the mains, because the first pull normally make the fixed clamp move sometimes...

Any help on how to use the starting clamp?

Cheers.
 

eelhc

Hall of Fame
#2
  1. Starting Crosses
  2. Starting Mains (Yusuki method)
  3. ATW pattern (free up machine clamp)
  4. Tying Knots
  5. Extension/Bridge

There may be more but these are the ones I can think of.

I prefer a starting clamp is preferred over the starting knot on the crosses. Don't like the bulky starting knot deforming the grommet.
 
#3
  1. Starting Crosses
  2. Starting Mains (Yusuki method)
  3. ATW pattern (free up machine clamp)
  4. Tying Knots
  5. Extension/Bridge

There may be more but these are the ones I can think of.
Good list above.

In case you don't already know what "bridging" (to your tensioner) is, here's an example:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c9kRV5HQpD4

Other uses:
Doing a 50-50 pattern for the crosses (IF you have a fixed swivel clamp machine)
Starting Mains (drakulie method)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4TpCdIJHeM

Here are the basics:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOvInAu2YsM&list=UU7UgD2HIyslGofSyX811fsQ
 
#4
The key is in the name. Staring the mains, or starting the crosses. If you're used to a starting knot that is ok and saves a little string. But starting clamp will be easier I think.

What knot do you tie off with?
 
#5
I always use a normal knot, i.e. Double Half Hitch Knot.

I started recently stringing.. and not completely clear on the difference between the several knots. Is it just a question of preference or personal style of the stringer?

The racquets that I string come out pretty good. I don't see any big difference in using just "normal" knots!
 
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#6
I always use a normal knot, i.e. Double Half Hitch Knot.

I started recently stringing.. and not completely clear on the difference between the several knots. Is it just a question of preference or personal style of the stringer?

The racquets that I string come out pretty good. I don't see any big difference in using just "normal" knots!
With a knot like the so called Parnell knot, you can easily cinch it up removing most of the slack. Back when I was taught to string in 1968 the old timer that taught me to string showed me the knot he used, and said no one else typically uses it, as that can distinguish my job from anyone else. It is what is now called the Parnell knot.
Back in that time era, a customer brought back a racquet that he said I strung where the knot came untied, that racquet had just single half hitch knots (many stringers did use half hitch knots on woodies back in the day). I told him he must have another racquet with same string type with a different knot, as I tie a different knot. Sure enough he had the racquet with the half hitch done elsewhere, as back then wooden racquets did not typically have a serial # to keep record.Now it seems like most stringers use the Parnell knot, as well as the Pro knot.
 
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#7
Got my starting clamp this morning in the mail - already strung two rackets and had to use it multiple times - starting crosses and bridging over. Best purchase ever!
 
#8
Reasons for a starting clamp: Not a necessity, but makes life easier.

They are reasonably cheap!

1.I have used it for flattening out the tip end of the string, which made cutting the tip at an angle easier, to help slide the string through a blocked hole.

2.Also used to bridge a scrap piece of string, to extend the length of string to reach tension head when string was a little short.(This saved my behind a # of times, I could have tied a string, but that is time consuming, and not reliable!)I keep a separate starting clamp with a scrap string on it when this situation happens, I am all set to bridge the string.

3.Also, there are some racquets where the cross tie off to start is listed to tie on a cross string,one example,Babolat PStorm, the cross tieoff is on the 3rd cross (not on a main). You need a starting clamp so you can weave the first several crosses , then tieoff at the 11 H.as listed. You can enlargen a grommet if you want to as long as you do this before you start, but is not what manuf. stringing pattern lists

4.You can use a starting clamp to start your crosses, so all knots are the same,and you would not be tying off on a main string and pulling tension against it, and when using thin gut or other 'fragile' multifilament strings, and especially at higher tensions, it is not uncommon to snap that first cross string right at the knot or at the two sharp turns the string makes, With using a starting clamp, you do not pull tension against these turns.

5. Some ATW patterns require the use of a starting clamp, (Or use of flying clamp, to use like a starting clamp), to hold the tension of the string on outside of the frame, until you free up a machine clamp

6. Some stringers like to use it to cinch up a knot as well, personally I just use my fingers.

7. Use a starting clamp to back up the machines clamp when starting the main strings.( Can be used as back up, or used with the Yusuki method of starting mains ) .

They are cheap! I have 3 of them. They are cheap. Yes you can do without, but like anything else when you have one its nice to have. I would not want to string without one any more. It costs more for a set of VS gut than a starting clamp.
 
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#9
Just used my Gamma starting clamp as a bridge for the first time today. I was happy to have two as the other was still holding the first cross string. The clamp earned its cost today just for the bridging option that I utilized. Saved me having to restring the crosses in order to get enough string to reach the tension head.

Don't get one, get two.
 
#10
I just bought a starting clamp... But now I realize I am not sure how to use it. Is it only to start the crosses? I thought so... But I always do a two piece stringing, so I always do a starting knot for the crosses, making the use of the starting clamp redundant. It's actually being useful when starting the mains, because the first pull normally make the fixed clamp move sometimes...

Any help on how to use the starting clamp?

Cheers.
here is a great video on how to use the starting clamp for the crosses:

 
#12
Reasons for a starting clamp: Not a necessity, but makes life easier.

They are reasonably cheap!

1.I have used it for flattening out the tip end of the string, which made cutting the tip at an angle easier, to help slide the string through a blocked hole.

2.Also used to bridge a scrap piece of string, to extend the length of string to reach tension head when string was a little short.(This saved my behind a # of times, I could have tied a string, but that is time consuming, and not reliable!)I keep a separate starting clamp with a scrap string on it when this situation happens, I am all set to bridge the string.

3.Also, there are some racquets where the cross tie off to start is listed to tie on a cross string,one example,Babolat PStorm, the cross tieoff is on the 3rd cross (not on a main). You need a starting clamp so you can weave the first several crosses , then tieoff at the 11 H.as listed. You can enlargen a grommet if you want to as long as you do this before you start, but is not what manuf. stringing pattern lists

4.You can use a starting clamp to start your crosses, so all knots are the same,and you would not be tying off on a main string and pulling tension against it, and when using thin gut or other 'fragile' multifilament strings, and especially at higher tensions, it is not uncommon to snap that first cross string right at the knot or at the two sharp turns the string makes, With using a starting clamp, you do not pull tension against these turns.

5. Some ATW patterns require the use of a starting clamp, (Or use of flying clamp, to use like a starting clamp), to hold the tension of the string on outside of the frame, until you free up a machine clamp

6. Some stringers like to use it to cinch up a knot as well, personally I just use my fingers.

7. Use a starting clamp to back up the machines clamp when starting the main strings.( Can be used as back up, or used with the Yusuki method of starting mains ) .

They are cheap! I have 3 of them. They are cheap. Yes you can do without, but like anything else when you have one its nice to have. I would not want to string without one any more. It costs more for a set of VS gut than a starting clamp.

Hi jim e,
regarding point 7 which method you prefer? Backup or Yusuki?
I'm trying to find the best method to use the starting clamp for main start.

Thanks!
 
#13
I have been using the starting clamp with the Yusuki method for a few years now. Used it ever since it was published in the USRA magazine.
Only thing different I do now is use a spacer between frame and clamp, so clamp is not on string that turns on the bend that goes through the grommets.
 
#15
I have been using the starting clamp with the Yusuki method for a few years now. Used it ever since it was published in the USRA magazine.
Only thing different I do now is use a spacer between frame and clamp, so clamp is not on string that turns on the bend that goes through the grommets.
Richard Parnell now uses a piece of leather between the clamp and frame. What does he call it? You guessed it, "a Parnell Pad!"
 
#17
Richard Parnell now uses a piece of leather between the clamp and frame. What does he call it? You guessed it, "a Parnell Pad!"
With just a piece of leather, he is using most likely to protect the frame from the clamp resting against it. I use a dense rubber spacer about an inch long with a slit through it that keeps the clamp on a section of the string that doesn't take a bend through the grommet and also protects the frame.
 

MAX PLY

Hall of Fame
#18
^^^ I use something similar. Protecting both the racquet and preserves a length of string for tying the finishing knot on the crosses (particularly useful for softer cross strings).
 
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