How to visualise the lag and whipping motion on the forehand and 2 handed backhand.

a12345

Semi-Pro
Some people have a hard time getting that lag and snap/liquid whip motion on their strokes.

And the reason why in my opinion is that they are continuing through their strokes in the classic , smooth, WTA forehand style manner.

The key to feeling and getting the liquid whip happening is understanding that you need to stop turning , and you need to do it abruptly.

If you imagine sitting on a spinning disc rotating quickly and then I stop that disc, you go flying off it. Or imagine flicking a whip, the whippy effect comes from when you stop your hand and the whip follows through.

So in order to visualise how to get a liquid whip motion you need to turn your hips and body from facing the fence, to facing forwards, but then stop abruptly. Your arm will then be flung forwards as it catches up, and then finally the racket head will snap forwards from lag position to contact point. It should feel like the racket is doing quick bounce like an elastic band motion.

Now the same also applies to the 2 handed backhand. As you turn your hips and body quickly your arms and racket should almost feel "trapped" behind you, but as you stop turning abruptly at about 45 degrees facing forwards, your arms will catch up and the racket will snap forwards. Now the backhand will feel different from the forehand as youve got 2 hands on the racket but you should still feel that slingshot effect.

So the key to getting the whippy motion on both sides is to visualise not just how quickly you accelerate the turn of your body, but just as important how quickly you stop turning, in order to allow the lag and whip motion to take over.

If you follow through your body turn or do it in one smooth motion you will never get that lag snap effect, it has to be an abrupt turn and an abrupt stop to allow your arm and the racket to sling through like stopping the spinning disc.
 
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a12345

Semi-Pro
A good example of it is this video of Nadal where you see rapid body and shoulder turn but its important to focus on the rapid stop of his shoulders when hes facing straight forwards. The effect is his arm is flung forwards as it catches up. Any shoulder turn after this is just the momentum of his arm carrying through.

 

undecided

Rookie
Interesting. Do we have any additional backing to support this? I mean, it sounds perfectly reasonable and it may explain why sometime I have lag and sometimes I don't, I may not be consistent enough with body control.
 

nvr2old

Professional
personally think light grip and loose arm is key to kinetic chain as well as when and where ball is contacted in stroke specifically out in front of body for ground strokes. In golf they teach that in the the downswing the shoulders and arms initially are not forced into accelerating and that during a practice swing the Swoosh sound the club makes should be at ball contact area and beyond but not before this. Same with tennis. Swoosh of racquet should be in well front of body with max whip and acceleration there during practice swings.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
You are correct, it’s important element of good techniques, and Nadal does this great. Related to this is the need to use efficient link at shoulder. Some other techniques use arm forward swing more or less simultaneous with torso turn, which forces a player to use slower torso rotation (as chest muscles should be able to overcome arm and racquet inertia). Modern FH uses strong link via externally rotated shoulder, which makes arm being “carried” on fully stretched big muscles - consistent, reliable link. And then goes your chest stop and arm propelling forward with all the momentum passed.
 

undecided

Rookie
In the Nadal video, I do see the legs and hips really not rotating at all through the ball until after the torso has rotated . But, I think that is an illusion. The huge leg muscles must have transferred energy to the torso, forced to rotate and the arm went along. I do see that at the moment of impact his shoulder are wide open basically parallel to the baseline. It seems that the shoulders begin their opening up way before impact.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Another genious thread from the TTW armchair experts

Where is this abrupt and forced stop in the best forehands in the world then apart from rare ocassions?



 

FiReFTW

Legend
The OP is completely wrong as people here usually are when they open up these threads with silly mechanical theories on how some stroke should be hit to get the most out of it.

His theory has no solid base, as most ATP players rotate their upper body and shoulders through the contact on alot of their shots, which is what you want to do if you want to put your whole kinetic chain and body behind the ball and hit a heavy shot.

Nadal does not usually go for heavy powerful shots but he tends to exaggerate topspin and go for MAX topspin, because his aim is to add the most topspin possible and has alot of vertical component in his swing where the momentum goes in another direction it is giving this effect of "abrupt stop of the body" which is not really a stop but just change of momentum of the path of acceleration of the racquet.

Thats why you see everyone in the videos above extending their upper body and shoulder through contact on most shots, because they are hitting hard with alot of topspin still but they are not going for extreme topspin, when they want to hit alot more topspin they have alot more vertical component or the racquet gets pulled more sideways which makes the effect that OP is describing, this is very evident in the Federer video in the end where he hits alot of topspin and buggy whip also and his body does not rotate and go through the contact like before.

There are situations where you do this (extreme topspin, on the run and can't rotate fully, late on contact) but on most you want to get your shoulders into the ball not stopping them and certainly not by force.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
Another genious thread from the TTW armchair experts

Where is this abrupt and forced stop in the best forehands in the world then apart from rare ocassions?



It's maybe not a freeze as the word "abrupt" implies, but the torso rotation between the following two frames is noticeably slower than before and after:

Some players do less of this, some more, sometimes there's variety.
 

Kevo

Legend
Well, whether or not you can completely transfer momentum from one part of the kinetic chain to another is probably going to depend on a variety of factors and be very situational, but I think the logic is sound and should be experimented with if you are looking to upgrade your strokes.

In my mind the best transfer is going to come from a motion where the stop in one link in the chain is not forced but naturally transferred into the next motion. For example, on serve, if you are able to execute the upward swing of the shoulders and arm so the arm fully extends and has no where left to go, all that momentum can be transferred into the rotation of the arm into the ball. Doing this smoothly and precisely on a first serve produces a lot of easy power.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
The OP is completely wrong as people here usually are when they open up these threads with silly mechanical theories on how some stroke should be hit to get the most out of it.

His theory has no solid base, as most ATP players rotate their upper body and shoulders through the contact on alot of their shots, which is what you want to do if you want to put your whole kinetic chain and body behind the ball and hit a heavy shot.

Nadal does not usually go for heavy powerful shots but he tends to exaggerate topspin and go for MAX topspin, because his aim is to add the most topspin possible and has alot of vertical component in his swing where the momentum goes in another direction it is giving this effect of "abrupt stop of the body" which is not really a stop but just change of momentum of the path of acceleration of the racquet.

Thats why you see everyone in the videos above extending their upper body and shoulder through contact on most shots, because they are hitting hard with alot of topspin still but they are not going for extreme topspin, when they want to hit alot more topspin they have alot more vertical component or the racquet gets pulled more sideways which makes the effect that OP is describing, this is very evident in the Federer video in the end where he hits alot of topspin and buggy whip also and his body does not rotate and go through the contact like before.

There are situations where you do this (extreme topspin, on the run and can't rotate fully, late on contact) but on most you want to get your shoulders into the ball not stopping them and certainly not by force.
The body stops turning at contact point, this is obvious, and it reaches its position slightly before the arm and racket get to contact point. At this point the arm catches up as does the racket which is what creates that snap. The body turns and stops at where it needs to be at contact point, and the arm and racket get there 2nd and 3rd.

Peak power generated by the kinetic chain is released at the contact point, everything after is simply the momentum carrying through, in particular the follow through of the arm doing the windshield wiper motion.

The key to making it work is that you must stop, and not carry through like you are suggesting - thats not the whippy action, thats just dragging the racket through the ball like WTA players do.
 
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a12345

Semi-Pro
The verdasco video you provided is a perfect example in slow motion.

This one below of Murray is another good example.


Body turns, body stops, arm catches up and continues to fling forward towards contact point, the momentum of the arm then takes the body round, Murray is not turning his body anymore at this point, his arms momentum is simply taking him round.

If you want that lag and snap you need to stop turning and let the arm and racket catch up. The body stops turning at about 10.5 seconds, and the snap happens at 11 seconds.
 
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a12345

Semi-Pro
Heres Federer doing it:


After the body and shoulders stop turning the racket catches up and gets flung at the ball, he is not rotating though the ball at contact.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
@a12345 you are simply wrong and you post videos that prove your wrong which makes me think you are also blind.
At no point in the forehand stroke do you abruptly or forcefully stop any part of your body.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
If it was like you claim the arm would be dead still at the back position till the body "stops" then be flung forward.

In reality the arm is moving forward when the shoulders move forward.

The arm just speeds beyond when the body transfers its energy.
Its suppose to be a flowing kinetic chain where every part adds to the next and when the arm gets the energy the body gradually slows.
Theres no forceful stop its just a smooth transfer of energy from one part to the next and the funny thing is its as clear as day in every video here.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
If it was like you claim the arm would be dead still at the back position till the body "stops" then be flung forward.

In reality the arm is moving forward when the shoulders move forward.

The arm just speeds beyond when the body transfers its energy.
Its suppose to be a flowing kinetic chain where every part adds to the next and when the arm gets the energy the body gradually slows.
Theres no forceful stop its just a smooth transfer of energy from one part to the next and the funny thing is its as clear as day in every video here.
The active driving of the Kinetic chain for the body and shoulders has to end at some point and transfer it to the arm, and it ends when its roughly facing forwards. More specifically, where it should be at contact point. After rapid acceleration its rapid deceleration. The arm is relatively passive in all of this, at least for this whippy shot, and gets thrown at the ball.

Visualising this end point allows you to understand how the racket lags and "catches up"

The body and shoulders turn quickly and then "waits" for the arm and racket to catch up.

Youve got 2 options really. Once you begin turning your body and shoulders, you can either:

Stop at contact point when youve basically turned 90 degrees.
You can keep rotating your body past contact point until you go from facing the right fence to the left fence.

If you stop turning after 90 degrees, which is what you should be doing, you want to uncoil, and then stop, which by its nature should be abrupt.

If you drive through the ball there will be no whip to it, youre just pushing through the ball, which is a different shot.
 
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FiReFTW

Legend
.
If you stop turning after 90 degrees, which is what you should be doing, you want to uncoil, and then stop, which by its nature should be abrupt.
Only 5% of forehands in all videos above do this.

The rest always every upper body continues to rotate without stoping completely.

You have to admit ur wrong because theres a ton of proof in this thread proving you wrong.
If you cant see well then i guess ur going to have to go frame by frame in order to see that the shoulders keep moving non stop.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
Only 5% of forehands in all videos above do this.

The rest always every upper body continues to rotate without stoping completely.

You have to admit ur wrong because theres a ton of proof in this thread proving you wrong.
If you cant see well then i guess ur going to have to go frame by frame in order to see that the shoulders keep moving non stop.
The upper body stops at contact point. It then turns again only because the momentum of the arm carries it through. Now the arm and racket is dragging the body.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
The upper body stops at contact point. It then turns again only because the momentum of the arm carries it through. Now the arm and racket is dragging the body.
No it doesnt, slow down your slow motion videos of murray and others and you will see it does not STOP.
Why are you so blindly convinced that something has to stop in order to pass the momentum to another part? Its simply n9t true, compare where the shoulders are before contact at contact and after contact, they are in movement, they dont stop.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
By abruptly stoping you stop the transfer of energy that is flowing and break the kinetic chain.
It doesnt work like that.
Its gradual and smooth not jerky and abrupt.

Its like if a car would have a weight on a rope and drove very fast and then curve a tiny bit to the side and stop.
When it curves (forward momentum slows) it starts transfering it to the weight, but as it stops instantly the tramsfer instantly stops and the weight gets flung only with the build up of energy it had before the stop.

Now if instead instantly stoping the car simply curves and keeps curving and the speed is gradualy slowed then it keeps transfering the build up force and energy into the weight till it gets released naturally.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
By abruptly stoping you stop the transfer of energy that is flowing and break the kinetic chain.
It doesnt work like that.
Its gradual and smooth not jerky and abrupt.

Its like if a car would have a weight on a rope and drove very fast and then curve a tiny bit to the side and stop.
When it curves (forward momentum slows) it starts transfering it to the weight, but as it stops instantly the tramsfer instantly stops and the weight gets flung only with the build up of energy it had before the stop.

Now if instead instantly stoping the car simply curves and keeps curving and the speed is gradualy slowed then it keeps transfering the build up force and energy into the weight till it gets released naturally.
Driving through the ball is not the same as the whippy lag shot. They are different shots.

A classic forehand would do exactly as you are suggesting, building up the speed and pull the racket through to hitting the ball. There is no lag and snap here. The whippy ATP style forehand is much more segmented and does not work that way.

Now of course ATP players will drive through the ball sometimes depending on the shot. High balls for example if they want to hit flat.

But were talking about a specific shot here.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
Driving through the ball is not the same as the whippy lag shot. They are different shots.

A classic forehand would do exactly as you are suggesting, building up the speed and pull the racket through to hitting the ball. There is no lag and snap here. The whippy ATP style forehand is much more segmented and does not work that way.

Now of course ATP players will drive through the ball sometimes depending on the shot. High balls for example if they want to hit flat.

But were talking about a specific shot here.
Oh boy, no its not.





Upper body is clearly rotating PRIOR, ON and AFTER contact. There is no forced abrupt stop, there simply IS NOT. Sometimes the players do it, but its situational, but on most forehands your driving your body mass around.
The lag and snap does not happen because you stop your upper body for godness sakes, the lag happens because your wrist is relaxed, the racquet gets dragged and has weight on the tip, and the release happens because the arm with racquet in hand reaches the maximum point infront and starts curving inside like a car draging a weight on a rope, so it gets flung forward, not because the body stops.

Im done arguing its pointless, I suggest you watch the videos above in super slow motion by slowing them down further to 0.25x, if you still don't see the body rotating through contact then I guess in your mind it just doesn't.
 

spun_out

Semi-Pro
the difference between arm chair coach and a real player is simple. if you have an idea, go out and try it. if it makes your forehand and backhand better (in this case), then great. if not, then stop doing it. don't go directly from videos to instruction. see if the idea you gained from watching videos actually work in real life before posting it as universal truth here. and whether the above idea is true or not is not that relevant to its value as instruction. there are plenty of instruction that are not factually true. but they have value because they work to make the player (not all players) better.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
the difference between arm chair coach and a real player is simple. if you have an idea, go out and try it. if it makes your forehand and backhand better (in this case), then great. if not, then stop doing it. don't go directly from videos to instruction. see if the idea you gained from watching videos actually work in real life before posting it as universal truth here. and whether the above idea is true or not is not that relevant to its value as instruction. there are plenty of instruction that are not factually true. but they have value because they work to make the player (not all players) better.
What if I tell you I tried this exact idea, and it makes the difference just straight forward?
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
i don't understand what you mean by "it makes the difference just straight forward."
Hitting with continuous torso rotation against hitting with slowed down torso rotation and arm+racquet release is different, executed differently, perceived differently and produces different kind of ball.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
produces different kind of ball.
Thats the first thing I agree with in this whole thread.

But I never said same speed torso rotation is the right way to hit, I said theres a release and theres a kinetic chain and theres a transfer of the kinetic chain from segment to segment, what I said is that its not an abrupt and forced stop, but gradual and smooth.

There are situations where you do forcefully stop the torso, but most forehands are not like that, most forehands are a kinetic chain of smooth and fluid transfers, just like the service motion is.
 

spun_out

Semi-Pro
Hitting with continuous torso rotation against hitting with slowed down torso rotation and arm+racquet release is different, executed differently, perceived differently and produces different kind of ball.
which did you like better? which method was more effective in more situations (i.e. more versatile)? was the transition from one way of hitting to the other easy enough that you can pick and choose depending on the situation or was it something that you need to choose one or the other? i would decide based on the answers to these questions.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
Thats the first thing I agree with in this whole thread.

But I never said same speed torso rotation is the right way to hit, I said theres a release and theres a kinetic chain and theres a transfer of the kinetic chain from segment to segment, what I said is that its not an abrupt and forced stop, but gradual and smooth.

There are situations where you do forcefully stop the torso, but most forehands are not like that, most forehands are a kinetic chain of smooth and fluid transfers, just like the service motion is.
The only reason it's not abrupt is because you cannot do it abrupt, practically. And if you pursue abrupt stop, well, that may result in slower initial rotation to make an abrupt stop possible... dunno who may ever actually do it this way.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
which did you like better? which method was more effective in more situations (i.e. more versatile)? was the transition from one way of hitting to the other easy enough that you can pick and choose depending on the situation or was it something that you need to choose one or the other? i would decide based on the answers to these questions.
The good way is slowing down torso rotation before ball contact. Transition is easy in terms of consciously controlling what you do with practice ball, but better be ingrained to actually use consistently. However, sometimes need to pay attention when shots not working. Inside-out FHs are particularly exposed to over-rotation.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
The only reason it's not abrupt is because you cannot do it abrupt, practically. And if you pursue abrupt stop, well, that may result in slower initial rotation to make an abrupt stop possible... dunno who may ever actually do it this way.

1st forehand and some later ones like im talking about.

2nd forehand and a few ones after the 2nd abrupt stop like I said in certain situations (like when your late as roger was here)
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
Oh boy, no its not.





Upper body is clearly rotating PRIOR, ON and AFTER contact. There is no forced abrupt stop, there simply IS NOT. Sometimes the players do it, but its situational, but on most forehands your driving your body mass around.
The lag and snap does not happen because you stop your upper body for godness sakes, the lag happens because your wrist is relaxed, the racquet gets dragged and has weight on the tip, and the release happens because the arm with racquet in hand reaches the maximum point infront and starts curving inside like a car draging a weight on a rope, so it gets flung forward, not because the body stops.

Im done arguing its pointless, I suggest you watch the videos above in super slow motion by slowing them down further to 0.25x, if you still don't see the body rotating through contact then I guess in your mind it just doesn't.
Hes gone from 90 degree facing side on to facing forwards, and are you suggesting the extra few degrees hes continuing rotating shows he is rotating his body after the shot?

Is your evidence that hes rotating based on the fact thats he doesnt get a perfect 90 degrees stop, or that he hasnt stopped like hes just hit a brick wall?

He has stopped rotating, or at least he is trying to stop, and he must stop rotating at contact point. Anything after should just be momentum carrying him through.
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame

1st forehand and some later ones like im talking about.

2nd forehand and a few ones after the 2nd abrupt stop like I said in certain situations (like when your late as roger was here)
As I told before, I believe the torso rotatio speed between these two frames is significantly slower than earlier in the swing, which allows for the arm to get forward and racquet head to flip around into contact. He's not exactly flat to target with his chest, which is a variety. Looks like some "fading" to hit to the BH corner.

The 2nd and 3rd hits are not a good example. Nadal is in his full-power through the ball (not buggy-whip) hitting.

Add: Fed shots at 1:35 and 1:47 have noticeable torso rotation slowdown for contact. Once again, not relevant that he's a bit past square to the target for those shots. The key thing is torso acceleration played out, speed "passed" to the arm.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
Thats the first thing I agree with in this whole thread.

But I never said same speed torso rotation is the right way to hit, I said theres a release and theres a kinetic chain and theres a transfer of the kinetic chain from segment to segment, what I said is that its not an abrupt and forced stop, but gradual and smooth.

There are situations where you do forcefully stop the torso, but most forehands are not like that, most forehands are a kinetic chain of smooth and fluid transfers, just like the service motion is.
The whippy ATP forehand is like that, fast drive of the kinetic chain, fast stop. Its explosive. The explosive jerky nature throws the arm out like a whip.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
As I told before, I believe the torso rotatio speed between these two frames is significantly slower than earlier in the swing, which allows for the arm to get forward and racquet head to flip around into contact. He's not exactly flat to target with his chest, which is a variety. Looks like some "fading" to hit to the BH corner.
And what is it that I said before? Do you read my comments throughouly?
 

Dragy

Hall of Fame
And what is it that I said before? Do you read my comments throughouly?
This one?
Another genious thread from the TTW armchair experts
Or this one?
The OP is completely wrong as people here usually are when they open up these threads with silly mechanical theories on how some stroke should be hit to get the most out of it.
Or maybe this?
Im done arguing its pointless
So why are you still here?

By the way, all rope analogies are very far from what happens and display only part of the complex model. Thus misleading.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro

Mind telling us where you see any jerky movements?
I mean thats in super slow mo but in general the way its segmented, relative to the classic forehand.

And if you turn fast and stop vs the slower winding up of the kinetic chain, its much more jerky in comparison.

This would be a smoother all in one wind up of the body:

 

FiReFTW

Legend
I mean thats in super slow mo but in general the way its segmented, relative to the classic forehand.

And if you turn fast and stop vs the slower winding up of the kinetic chain, its much more jerky in comparison.

This would be a smoother all in one wind up of the body:

Its not as continious build up as a classic one but you really cant say its jerky, its quite a fluid and flowing motion without a true stop or jerk with a nice smooth loop and swing, but it does have more slow downs and accelerations as a classic one that just picks up speed slowly and continously
 

JohnYandell

Hall of Fame
The mythical quest for lag and snap! In my view one of the worst, most inaccurate, and destructive teaching phrases ever created! Lag happens virtually automatically. Snap does not happen at all.

Unless your hitting arm is literally rigid as concrete, the wrist will naturally lay back at some point before or during the start of the forward swing. From there you will usually see (in high level players at least) some forward flex of the wrist on the way to contact. The exception being full western grips where there is no wrist lay back.

Is that a "snap?" Nope. The brilliant biomechanical researcher Brian Gordon measured what actually happens. Elite players are actually inhibiting the forward flex to create the right contact point and control the shot line. If the forearm muscles controlling the wrist were totally relaxed the racket head would come all the way around to neutral or even further due to the forces in the swing.

But hundreds and hundreds of high speed video examples from match play show the wrist is still laid back before, during and after contact. In fact sometimes more laid back after.
 

FiReFTW

Legend
The mythical quest for lag and snap! In my view one of the worst, most inaccurate, and destructive teaching phrases ever created! Lag happens virtually automatically. Snap does not happen at all.

Unless your hitting arm is literally rigid as concrete, the wrist will naturally lay back at some point before or during the start of the forward swing. From there you will usually see (in high level players at least) some forward flex of the wrist on the way to contact. The exception being full western grips where there is no wrist lay back.

Is that a "snap?" Nope. The brilliant biomechanical researcher Brian Gordon measured what actually happens. Elite players are actually inhibiting the forward flex to create the right contact point and control the shot line. If the forearm muscles controlling the wrist were totally relaxed the racket head would come all the way around to neutral or even further due to the forces in the swing.

But hundreds and hundreds of high speed video examples from match play show the wrist is still laid back before, during and after contact. In fact sometimes more laid back after.
I think by snap most people refer to forearm pronation.
 

JohnYandell

Hall of Fame
Fire,
But the forearm doesn't pronate. The hand arm and racket rotate as a unit from the shoulder. That's an independent variable.
 

a12345

Semi-Pro
The mythical quest for lag and snap! In my view one of the worst, most inaccurate, and destructive teaching phrases ever created! Lag happens virtually automatically. Snap does not happen at all.

Unless your hitting arm is literally rigid as concrete, the wrist will naturally lay back at some point before or during the start of the forward swing. From there you will usually see (in high level players at least) some forward flex of the wrist on the way to contact. The exception being full western grips where there is no wrist lay back.

Is that a "snap?" Nope. The brilliant biomechanical researcher Brian Gordon measured what actually happens. Elite players are actually inhibiting the forward flex to create the right contact point and control the shot line. If the forearm muscles controlling the wrist were totally relaxed the racket head would come all the way around to neutral or even further due to the forces in the swing.

But hundreds and hundreds of high speed video examples from match play show the wrist is still laid back before, during and after contact. In fact sometimes more laid back after.
Depends on how you define snap. There is no active pushing of the wrist. However if your wrist is loose it will release from a fully cocked back position during the swing to a slightly more forward position at contact point. And it will do this simply because the forward motion has stopped and the arm and racket is catching up.

If the wrist remained fully cocked back at contact point you would need your arm almost straight in front of your chest in order to get the racket head facing forwards.

If you hold your racket at contact point, your wrist is back but its not as far back as it was during the swing.

So the wrist starts to release just before contact point and it carries on releasing until it gets to a neutral position during your windshield wiper motion.

That moment between your wrist being fully cocked back due your body/torso turn and then being released just slightly before you reach contact point is what id define as the snap or that little trampoline effect. Its not active, its just the racket catching up and being released onto the ball.
 
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TnsGuru

Professional
I think this is the best video I have found on this subject. Try not to be too active about the wrist, it is a more passive movement so be loose and not think about or obsesse about it.
 

JohnYandell

Hall of Fame
There is a larger point here. From what I read a lot of players on this Forum torture themselves with issues like this when they are consequences of more important underlying fundamentals. If your coiling is good and you have a reasonably compact backswing and you learn to swing to the forward extension point, issues about the wrist etc will tend to disappear.
 

pencilcheck

Semi-Pro
I see a lot of YouTube links of various pros hitting the shots in different situations.

It is a good hypothesis, why don’t you try it out yourself and post a video of you doing the abrupt stop?
 
I watch Dimitrov in slo-mo [the video itself slows down so you don't have to single-step through it] and see no abrupt stopping of the rotation.

Start around 0:40; there are various other times in this video where the slowdown occurs.

 
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