How's my Stringing method? New Stringer

Weevil

New User
Hi everyone, I recently was able to purchase a stringing machine and have settled on a method that I think is really solid, but wanted some feedback from some more experienced stringers. The method is as follows

Mains: Yusuki Method to start the mains, then go 3 on one side 4 on the other, next alternate two and two until you get to the last two mains. Add two pounds of tension to the last two mains, tie off using Parnell Knots.

Crosses: Use the Yonex Stringing Team Method, where the 2nd cross is woven first, then double back into the first cross, leaving enough string to reach the tensioner and securing the first cross with a starting clamp outside the racquet head. Weave the third cross next and pull tension on the second cross. After this continue down weaving one ahead each time. Add two pounds of tension to the last two crosses, then tie off using Parnell Knots

Misc. Notes: I normally tension the crosses at 2 pounds less than the mains


What are your opinions on this method?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Don’t waste your time looking for comments and suggestions. Keep doing, what you’re doing it is a solid method. As you gain more experience you may want to try different methods. I encourage you to do so, they could be better ways to string your rackets. Always keep an open mind.
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
I do the exact same method except:

Mains, I do 3 on one side, 6 on other side, then go back to finish first side then finish the second side. I don't add tension for last two mains and I use Wilson Pro Knot instead of Parnell as it's cleaner.
 

First Serve

Rookie
I use the Yusuki method as well. I have trouble cinching up the Parnell knot so I use the double half hitch. Starting knots slow me down.

I use scrap ribbons to help with blocked holes.
 
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jim e

Legend
I use the Yusuki method as well. I have trouble cinching up the Parnell knot so I use the double half hitch. Starting knots slown me down.

I use scrap ribbons to help with blocked holes.
The so called Parnell knot is one of the easiest knots to cinch up, as that's an advantage of using it. You grab the second loop and rock it back and forth to cinch , pull tail (does not take too much force once cinched) , hold tail where you want tail to point and release clamp.
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
Looking at all the prestrung rackets coming from China reminds me that stringing is a factory job brought home. Don't fret over it too much unless your equipment is giving you issues and then this forum will likely get you straightened out.
 
The so called Parnell knot is one of the easiest knots to cinch up, as that's an advantage of using it. You grab the second loop and rock it back and forth to cinch , pull tail (does not take too much force once cinched) , hold tail where you want tail to point and release clamp.
But I like to release the tension from the clamp into the first loop to cinch up the first loop- seems I cannot do that with Parnell that’s why I use double hh
 

jim e

Legend
But I like to release the tension from the clamp into the first loop to cinch up the first loop- seems I cannot do that with Parnell that’s why I use double hh
When you grab the 2nd loop, and rock it back and forth you are cinching up the 1st loop, with minimal loss of tension.
If you like the double hh then whatever works for you.
 
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Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
But I like to release the tension from the clamp into the first loop to cinch up the first loop- seems I cannot do that with Parnell that’s why I use double hh
You can do the same thing with the Parnell knot. It is nothing but an an overhand knot. Or you could consider it a DHH if you want. The difference between a Parnell and a DHH is the second half hitch of the Parnell comes up through the first half hitch’s loop so you can not tighten the first half before tying the second.
 
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