Humidity, Tension Loss, and Natural Gut

#1
The consensus from posts that I've read here is that modern natural gut has a coating that makes it less likely to swell in high humidity environments and that it is also the most tension-loss resistant of the various strings (except perhaps poly).

For whatever reason, a recently strung gut that I'm using played very well on a low-humidity day. The wind shifted three days later, and I had so much trouble keeping the ball in the court that I switched racquets. Did I just convince myself that the humidity was responsible and was spraying balls because of bad technique (though I was fine when I switched racquets and played with multi), or is it possible that even today's modern natural gut is humidity sensitive (or loses tension at an alarming rate)?
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
#2
The consensus from posts that I've read here is that modern natural gut has a coating that makes it less likely to swell in high humidity environments and that it is also the most tension-loss resistant of the various strings (except perhaps poly).

For whatever reason, a recently strung gut that I'm using played very well on a low-humidity day. The wind shifted three days later, and I had so much trouble keeping the ball in the court that I switched racquets. Did I just convince myself that the humidity was responsible and was spraying balls because of bad technique (though I was fine when I switched racquets and played with multi), or is it possible that even today's modern natural gut is humidity sensitive (or loses tension at an alarming rate)?
I use RaquetTune to monitor the tension loss of my natural gut strings. Then you aren't playing a guessing game...
 
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