I’m a mess! What else can go wrong?

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#1
I’m 46. Up until 3 years ago, I was very healthy. Since then, I’ve had four surgeries; two back microdiscechtomies, one left knee, meniscus, and a right foot plantar fascia release.

Then I’ve since found I have Morton’s Neuroma. I was just recovering from that when I tore my calf muscle which the doctor diagnosed as Tennis Leg. I’d never heard of that but it didn’t feel good. I guess it could have been worse because for a second I thought I’d torn my achilles. Luckily, no surgery needed.

I need a workout system I can follow 6 days/week to stay healthy. I figure I can devote 1 hour for each workout. I workout in the morning before work and still want to be able to play tennis or basketball in the afternoon.

Who can help? Help! Please!
 

IowaGuy

Hall of Fame
#3
I workout in the morning before work and still want to be able to play tennis or basketball in the afternoon.
Working out 6 mornings per week + tennis/basketball in the afternoon, are you sure your injuries aren't simply from overuse?

I'm in my mid-40's and don't recover physically like I used to in my 20's. I'm sure to allow a periodic rest day, and alternate low-impact activities such as yoga with high-impact activities such as tennis...
 
#4
You didn't say what you do for exercise besides playing. If I were in your shoes: Boot camp, barre, then move into cross fit. I'd lose some weight (that's me anyway) and stretch a lot. I'm convinced that joint issues are commonly caused by soft tissue injuries that are untreated. So anytime i'm having trouble with any part of my body I go to the doc, get referred to PT and work with PT on a full diagnosis and work on the weaknesses. I've done that for my elbow, shoulder, back and hips. Each time I learn a ton and pickup important exercises for specific muscles.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
#5
I’ve been doing Power 90 in the mornings. It’s the precursor to P90X. It’s no where near intense. I play tennis once a week and basketball once every two weeks. I’d like to play more but I’m constantly busy.

I’m 5’9” 163lbs. My BMI is 23. My blood pressure is 120/73. I can run repeat 8 minute miles quite easily and when in shape can lower than by 30 seconds. I can curl 35# dumbbells in each arm for 3 sets of 8 reps. I usually only bench press 145 for 3 sets of 8 reps because I never have a spotter (dumb! I know!). I don’t do heavy weights with deadlifts or squats because of my previous back problems; instead I do lighter weights and more reps. I should definitely spend more time stretching.
 

nvr2old

Professional
#9
I'd say good old low impact full body cardio (quality stationary bike, rower, etc) followed by light weights to muscle rep failure and yoga. You get cardio, weights and stretching none of which is easy. You can tailor each to do as much or little as you need. Avoid high impact/plyo type stuff as joints done't like that as we age.
 
#10
I’m 46. Up until 3 years ago, I was very healthy. Since then, I’ve had four surgeries; two back microdiscechtomies, one left knee, meniscus, and a right foot plantar fascia release.

Then I’ve since found I have Morton’s Neuroma. I was just recovering from that when I tore my calf muscle which the doctor diagnosed as Tennis Leg. I’d never heard of that but it didn’t feel good. I guess it could have been worse because for a second I thought I’d torn my achilles. Luckily, no surgery needed.
None of your problems will be helped significantly (if at all) by resistance training.

With that understood, I'd recommend gymnastic style resistance training and stretching for overall body health. You don't need to work up to full execution of any of these skills (as you will likely never be able to do a full planche for example). But doing the programs will give you good overall strength and flexibility.

https://www.gymnasticbodies.com/

Don't get too turned off by the "hipster" vibe and over marketing of this. It's fundamentally good. Just close your eyes to the slick sales stuff and concentrate on the fundamentals of what the system offers. You can likely find similar exercise videos on-line for free if you don't want to pay for the programs. But buying the canned programs might save you time and wasted effort.

I bought a few of these programs and like them well enough. My weekly exercise program is done M/Th, T/F. Rest Wednesday. Takes about 1 hour each. Like you, I do them in the morning before work.

Day 1:

-Handstand pushups on 1-foot paralletes (assisted)
-Behind the back dips (full range)
-Side Lever (assisted)
-Rope Climb (hands only; no kipping)
-Front Lever (assisted)

Day 2:

-Straddle Planche (assisted)
-Full muscle-up; no kipping (assisted)
-Pistol squats (full range; no momentum assistance)
-V Up (assisted)

By assisted, I mean that I use a counterweight. Something like this, but I do it a bit different

http://roughstrength.com/pulley-system-best-thing-happened-calisthenics/
 
#11
I’m 46. Up until 3 years ago, I was very healthy. Since then, I’ve had four surgeries; two back microdiscechtomies, one left knee, meniscus, and a right foot plantar fascia release.

Then I’ve since found I have Morton’s Neuroma. I was just recovering from that when I tore my calf muscle which the doctor diagnosed as Tennis Leg. I’d never heard of that but it didn’t feel good. I guess it could have been worse because for a second I thought I’d torn my achilles. Luckily, no surgery needed.

I need a workout system I can follow 6 days/week to stay healthy. I figure I can devote 1 hour for each workout. I workout in the morning before work and still want to be able to play tennis or basketball in the afternoon.

Who can help? Help! Please!
You need to consult a physical therapist
 
#12
I’m 46. Up until 3 years ago, I was very healthy. Since then, I’ve had four surgeries; two back microdiscechtomies, one left knee, meniscus, and a right foot plantar fascia release.
....

Who can help? Help! Please!
Don't know that I can help, but I'd suggest seriously checking your diet.

It seems to me a lot of your injuries appear to be joint and connective tissue related. I don't know if we know enough about genetics as to why some normal weight and active people seem to run into serious body breakdown around their 30s-40s while others stay active into their 80s without major joint issues, but I think diet can play a role.

I'd look into making sure your diet has enough of the building blocks of joint tissue and collagen. Strangely, this seems to be one area of diet in which eating animal skin and cartilage seems to actually help your body maintain its own skin and cartilage. I'd consider supplementing vitamin C, D, and eating things like animal based gelatin. I don't know what the research is saying about Hyaluronic acid supplements, but I'd also investigate those. I know different cultures around the world consume higher amounts of bone broth and cartilage than in the SAD diet.
 
#13
Retirement would probably help.
I did that at 43. Since then I’ve got one torn menisci smothened and a hamstring tendon reconstructed.

Before that I had two meniscis cleaned up. I eonder what shall be the next. Having acupuncture for sinus problems at the moment by the way. Previously, ehile still at work I had the sinusses carved wider to be able to breath properly...

I’d say, I have a continuous condition, but the cause is allways a surprise. And would not say retirement is the answer.


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On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
#14
Working out 6 mornings per week + tennis/basketball in the afternoon, are you sure your injuries aren't simply from overuse?

I'm in my mid-40's and don't recover physically like I used to in my 20's. I'm sure to allow a periodic rest day, and alternate low-impact activities such as yoga with high-impact activities such as tennis...
Indeed! After a leg workout in the gym, it takes about 4 to 6 days to recover from heavy excercise at 5~0.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 
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