I don't understand this about Shapovalov

sredna42

Hall of Fame
He has/had that "x" factor, and seemed to have a form of formidable shot making gamestyle coalescing, but then its all just fizzled away.

Just guessing but i feel its part "insular parent coaching bubble" syndrome where the player is doomed to never adapting/evolving their game as mumsie knows best, and any advice to the contrary just makes them double down on their ideas. Ala zverev.

And the media hype was too sudden and too much for him to take in his stride without bursting a head gasket.
 

DSH

Legend
He has/had that "x" factor, and seemed to have a form of formidable shot making gamestyle coalescing, but then its all just fizzled away.

Just guessing but i feel its part "insular parent coaching bubble" syndrome where the player is doomed to never adapting/evolving their game as mumsie knows best, and any advice to the contrary just makes them double down on their ideas. Ala zverev.

And the media hype was too sudden and too much for him to take in his stride without bursting a head gasket.
Who do you think would be the ideal coach so that his game reaches another dimension and can evolve competing for the great titles of the circuit?
 
R

Robert Baratheon

Guest
Rod is 88,
Give that man a break
It was about proving a point son.
Read them again.
I was merely contradicting the point that what Rod says is supposed to be true.
I have huge respect for the Odd Flavor.
Rod Laver picked him to be the next dominant player in tennis. Being the GOAT's Chosen One is hype enough.
Rod Laver about Djokodal AO final 2019:
"It will be a close tussle. I’m leaning towards Nadal – but for no reason."

Rod Laver about Djokovic's chance against Nadal at the FO 2019:
“He’s got a good chance to do it. He played so unbelievably well against Nadal in the Australian Open. I’m thinking, ‘How can anybody do that?"
 

duaneeo

Hall of Fame
Clearly the guy has a lot more to work on in his game, but he is just 20. We can appreciate that is very young, right?
The 20-21 year old slam winner has become extinct in mens tennis. Hell, the 20-21 year old slam finalist has become extinct.
 

DSH

Legend
The 20-21 year old slam winner has become extinct in mens tennis. Hell, the 20-21 year old slam finalist has become extinct.
The last great teenager was Nadal and the last great young player was Del Potro.
10 years, isn't it?
:eek:
 

augustobt

Legend
IThese days if you want to catch him, you have to catch him early
I felt like I couldn't comment on this thread because I haven't been following Shapovalov enoughly to do that. But that is exactly the reason: He's losing in first and second rounds! I mean, the chances of me getting a match from Shapovalov if it's a Monday afternoon with absolutely nothing else to do.
 

Benben245

Professional
^^This. Someone else said it above that he just knows only one speed, which is bludgeoning the ball and when he gets frustrated he just hits it harder. This concept is real. A good returner will just let him beat himself by giving the ball back to him and tiring him or forcing error. People like his style because his mechanics are flashy - but it's gotta be tiring, and inconsistent vs a compact and fluid mechanical motion like fed and others.

The mental thing is really big too. If he can't hold it together and "play the game", then he's toast. Tennis is not just baseline bashing as hard as you can.
Be wary of athletes coached by their mother. #hiMainad
 

sredna42

Hall of Fame
I don't know why your personal attack is due, but I will not respond in a bad way.
I asked you a simple question, courtesy should never be lost, dear anonymous.
:)
If this were 20000 BC, my tribe up in the mountains would roll boulders onto your tribes little potato shacks and steal your goats
















Yes I'm bored
 

Jonas78

Legend
I think some people forget how young he is, he just turned 20. Comparing him with for example Khakanov at 23 makes no sense. I also expect him to do best on HC. He reached SF at Miami Masters earlier this year.
 

papertank

Hall of Fame
He's extremely inconsistent, even for a young player. There's no doubt though that he can play at a very high level at times, and each year since he's been around he's had just enough good runs to keep him in peoples' minds. At this point with how the next gen is going, he's as worth talking about as any of the other players. It'd be different if other players were leaving him in the dust and winning slams but we haven't seen anything close to that. He's still very much in the convo, especially since he's still very young at 20.
 

ibbi

Legend
The 20-21 year old slam winner has become extinct in mens tennis. Hell, the 20-21 year old slam finalist has become extinct.
Sure, but certainly the winners at that age at least are relative rarities. In the Open Era the average age of slam winners is something like 24-25, and that was even before these 3 old dudes helped skew that number upwards.
 

ForumMember

Hall of Fame
Honestly I don't expect a lot from him. He doesn't have mentality to grind it out. Zverev fights it out million times better than him despite being just Zverev himself. He can entertain here and there with his attacking, bordering flashy, tennis but can't expect him to play at top level weeks in and out.
 

weakera

Legend
I think part of it is that he is good looking and charismatic on court, and plays an aesthetic game with the pretty 1hbh and jumping shots.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
Go back a few pages in the Shapo thread and have a laugh. Fed fans making wrong predictions.
1HBH youngsters being hyped by them as usual.
 
He is lefty and has a 1HBH, he is eye candy for all the old folk who hate seeing the cookie cutter ball bashing mini djokos being produced by academies nowadays
 

The Green Mile

Bionic Poster
We did not anticipate this sort of mental frailty and inconsistency back in 2017 :whistle: Once he started to play more matches in multiple tournaments, the problems with his game also became more apparent. I still believe though :sneaky:
 

duaneeo

Hall of Fame
Sure, but certainly the winners at that age at least are relative rarities. In the Open Era the average age of slam winners is something like 24-25, and that was even before these 3 old dudes helped skew that number upwards.
Perhaps, but every decade in the Open Era had at least three players who were 21-and-under when they won their first slam...every decade except this one, with Murray being the youngest to win his first slam at age 25.
 

Slightly D1

Professional
Shapovalov beat some big names in wins that pushed him into the up and coming spotlight. He pretty much became the new face of Canadian tennis in 2017 when he upset Nadal in a huge match at Montreal. He's still young and growing though, I wouldn't be too hard on him even though his 2019 has been tough.
 

robthai

Hall of Fame
Felix is already better than him in my opinion. Shapovalov can be great too but he seriously needs to fix his return game and develop a consistent chip return with variation on his backhand.
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru
As long as he doesn't look like an old Axel Rose, we can call Shapovalov a success.
Shapo will never be as successful as Axl. It’s not even at the tip of his fingers to come anything near being that successful.
It’s an offence towards Axl comparing those two.
Axl will not know who shapo even is.
 

Toronto11

New User
The blow must have been so hard for him that he forgot the age of the man who made a great feat in tennis feasible: winning the Grand Slam.
In September, the 50th anniversary achieved by the legendary Rod Laver will be celebrated.
:)
He’s bounced around with many different coaches over the past couple years. I expect/hope he figures this out soon. I’m guessing his Mom who appears to control the coaching may have to give up some control for him to get to the next level.
 

USO19

Rookie
People keep falsely assuming the young guys are going to step up. They keep waiting for this era of tennis to be normal. It's never going to happen.

New players start winning when the Big 3 are done. And that's still some time away.
 
D

Deleted member 77403

Guest
He is going to have a pretty decent career when he gets it all together, there is a lot of raw talent and potential in him, even Federer has picked up on this.

His game his aesthetically pleasing to watch, he has a hyrbid of both Federer and Nadal in his game, and even bits of Djokovic. The main concern is about him not mentally getting distracted which is happening with all of these young players. Work ethic and mental application still are the keys to success, I think he is still figuring all of that out.

The rallies against Federer in Miami were fun once he got going. He has that flare and charisma on court, and I think he will do just fine.

 

D-Lite

Professional
Karen Khachanov won a freakin masters finals and I don't see them talking as much about him as they talk about this guy Shapo.
Reaching a semifinals in a masters these days is no special feat I think.

Chung reached Semis of a slam and he has been GOD knows where ever since.
Tennys freakin Sandgren had a deep run.
Anybody can do it these days and still amount to nothing in the grand scheme of things.

Shapo has no consistency whatsoever.
He can play out of his ass for a few matches in a row and reach a masters semi or something and then get beaten brutally in those but winning a slam is a different thing altogether.

It's not even about whether he will be able to do it in the future or not.
It's about him showing signs of it now or not.
And he is clearly not.
Then why so much talk? Nauseating stuff.
If he does something worth talking then get on with it, I won't make threads about it but right now it just doesn't make sense.

And it's not entirely about the talk happening about a certain player either, it's about the nature of that talk.
"He is the next big thing."
Yeah sure.

It brings the collective IQ(whatever's left of it) of the forum down when we hype players who don't deserve the hype.
Chung has been plagued by injury since his AO semi in 2018. He's finally back from his latest injury which kept him out since Feb, now playing a challenger in Chengdu and grinding his way into the SF. I imagine he will play the USO but will probably need a fair few months to get anywhere near to his top form, perhaps even keep expectations low until AO.
 

Subway Tennis

Hall of Fame
He has/had that "x" factor, and seemed to have a form of formidable shot making gamestyle coalescing, but then its all just fizzled away.

Just guessing but i feel its part "insular parent coaching bubble" syndrome where the player is doomed to never adapting/evolving their game as mumsie knows best, and any advice to the contrary just makes them double down on their ideas. Ala zverev.

And the media hype was too sudden and too much for him to take in his stride without bursting a head gasket.
At the moment his game is way too inefficient. He blows through mental and physical energy even in the Bo3 format.

There is no disguise, court craft or guile in his game. He is forced to rely on spectacular shotmaking. It looks great when it works, but it's a pretty high risk way to rack up match wins in the slow Court era, where consistency and point construction is an absolute necessity.

His backhand looks great at contact but the devil is in the details..... Look how long it takes him set up the shot. He doesn't take the ball nearly early enough.

The game has changed again in the last few years. Many of the top players have adapted to taking the ball impossibly early as a new tactic to rob opponents of decision-making time and forcing errors or short balls on slow courts where point ending shotmaking from deep in the court is now less common.
 
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iceman_dl6

Semi-Pro
He doesn't have the mental stability or game to succeed. He hits the ball way too hard and collapses during important stretches of the match. He is a solid top 70 player but won't win any slams unless he makes some big changes
I surely hope he doesn’t end up like Dimitrov (or worse)
 

bjk

Hall of Fame
He needs Steckley back. He reached the Miami semis with Steckley, fired Steckley, and hasn't done jack since. Bring back Steckley!
 

prairiegirl

Hall of Fame
I see 3 possible outcomes for Shapovalov:

1. He's already peaked and this is as high as he's ever going to achieve. It's possible he'll never fully realize the extent of his talent and he'll go from coach to coach trying to figure out the problem. He'll win little titles here and there but nothing significant. He'll stay in the top 30 or possibly top 25, with one or two chances to go higher, but not consistently. Mommy will keep interfering.
2. He's just going through a bad patch and hasn't quite realized his potential. Coaching changes have caused some inconsistency, and the early over-hype created unrealistic expectations. Now, he knows the hard work is making the key changes to his game, such as improving his ROS and game tactics. This is a process and we'll see results in a year or two. Possibly he ends up top 10 or top 5.
3. Denis will likely just not know what to do with his talent, and he'll fall backwards and end up a top 50 player but go no further. Mommy will destroy his career and he just won't ever stand up to her.
 
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