I finally mastered the ATW one piece

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
I had thought about it and done some before but I never felt it was fast, better, etc. This time was different.

These were four racquets that all had mains ending at the throat and I wanted to do 1 piece string jobs. Three were older 18x20 Head Radicals and one was a 16x18 Wilson HPS 6.1

They were strung on a Neos 1000 with glide bars. I needed one floating clamp.

Here’s what I did. For the mains, I strung one less on each side so the 18 became 16 and the 16 became 14. I then tied off on the short side and began the crosses on the second cross instead of the first. I SKIPPED THE OUTSIDE LAST MAINS AND THE FIRST CROSS. I then finished all of the crosses like normal but didn’t tie off. Instead, I strung the last outside main up the side I ended on and used my floating clamp to hold it at the head. I then strung the first cross which I skipped earlier and clamped with the glide bar. Finally I strung the last main down the other side, clamped with the floating clamp, and tied off.

That was by far the easiest method I had ever tried.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
thks for the information!
The way I measured the string for the short side was to pull the strings through the first main length one more time than there were mains to string. If I were stringing 8 on that side for a 18 main racquet, I’d pull 9 times through that first main. It was the perfect length for a tie off.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Congrats on adding ATW to your repertoire. I used that pattern for a while, and it sure does make the process easy. But FWIW it was eventually explained to me by a pro stringer, that the patterns that leave the outside mains off until the end might not be the best choice - at least not for Tennis racquets (see quote below). I now use the Universal ATW almost exclusively.

I will always say that there is no perfect ATW pattern. There are issues with all of them. However, any pattern that leaves out 1 or both outer mains may put more stress on the frame as frames are designed to be strung with all their mains 1st. I know that on the universal ATW you will string 1 outer main before the other, but time-wise it is very short and won't affect the frame.

Also, some people will say that stringing that bottom cross is going against the 'string bottom up rule' but that rule is to do with the moving of the stress when string crosses towards the top of the frame, whereas there is only 1 cross being strung no stress is being pushed towards the tip.

Regards

Paul
 
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1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
@dak95_00
no issue with what you did,, kudos on trying stuff,
I could be a lightly wrong on this, but i believe you just did a box pattern!,,
single box pattern, but box pattern non the less,,
Their is a european box pattern that might be what you descrived.. yulittle video on this,,
other box patterns are out there that go 2x or 3x arround the racquet,,
again, kudos for trying stuff..
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
You know, I might be wrong, I could be confusing the european.atw with european.box.pattern. haaa
if im wrong, my bad..
if im not wrong, plz blame the europeans for making stuff complicated, haaaa
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I had thought about it and done some before but I never felt it was fast, better, etc. This time was different.

These were four racquets that all had mains ending at the throat and I wanted to do 1 piece string jobs. Three were older 18x20 Head Radicals and one was a 16x18 Wilson HPS 6.1

They were strung on a Neos 1000 with glide bars. I needed one floating clamp.

Here’s what I did. For the mains, I strung one less on each side so the 18 became 16 and the 16 became 14. I then tied off on the short side and began the crosses on the second cross instead of the first. I SKIPPED THE OUTSIDE LAST MAINS AND THE FIRST CROSS. I then finished all of the crosses like normal but didn’t tie off. Instead, I strung the last outside main up the side I ended on and used my floating clamp to hold it at the head. I then strung the first cross which I skipped earlier and clamped with the glide bar. Finally I strung the last main down the other side, clamped with the floating clamp, and tied off.

That was by far the easiest method I had ever tried.
Why do you feel you need a flying clamp? You could just swap the glide bar around from main to cross position while the tensioner holds the string.

EDIT: If you string much poly you will drop that pattern pretty quick because of the last three weaves (outer mains and top cross.)
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
Why do you feel you need a flying clamp? You could just swap the glide bar around from main to cross position while the tensioner holds the string.

EDIT: If you string much poly you will drop that pattern pretty quick because of the last three weaves (outer mains and top cross.)
Swinging the glide bar is such a pain. With all of the crosses in place, there's very little if any draw back.

As far as stringing poly goes, I'd likely just do the two piece. I hate weaving poly almost as much as I hate weaving Gamma Ruff.

With these MP Radicals, the mains typically require 21' of string which is a weird number. There were three different Radical models I was stringing too. I had an i.Radical, a Youtek, and a Youtek IG. I couldn't remember which one required 20 and which required 21 so it was easier to just do 1 piece and save string. I was stringing them with some ridiculously cheap stuff so I guess it didn't matter too much but the result worked and they played nicely. It was interesting to play four different models or generations of Radicals all strung the same but that would be a topic for another thread in a different section. I also had the first Graphene MP. FWIW, I liked the i.Radical and Graphene the most because they were a bit stiffer and more solid feeling. I the I.Rad gets the nod because it's 18x20 from a player standpoint but the Graphene from the stringer standpoint at 16x19 :)
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
@dak95_00 whether your racket has an even or odd number of crosses will not matter with your ATW pattern because you string from two to bottom cross. I use a different ATW and always cross over on the lowest even numbered cross. But I don’t always use an ATW.
 
I use a completely different ATW pattern, but I have a hard weave on every other cross. Yes, it is a little more difficult to weave, but I've had good luck with it, and it's the one I learned first. I learned it from the Pro Kennex customer service rep after I broke my own Composite Dominator.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
I use a completely different ATW pattern, but I have a hard weave on every other cross. Yes, it is a little more difficult to weave, but I've had good luck with it, and it's the one I learned first. I learned it from the Pro Kennex customer service rep after I broke my own Composite Dominator.
That’s the reason I cross over on an even numbered cross. That way when I string an even cross (right to left) it’s and easy weave as I weave down the racket one ahead. Then (if I pull the next cross to be tension up against the last tensioned cross) it’s also an easy weave as I’m string up the racket closer to the last tensioned cross.
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I have a hard weave as well, but don't mind it. I always pull enough string on the short side to weave the first cross so I can tie off on a cross. I hold that cross with a starting clamp, weave the bottom cross with the long side, then come up on the empty main and then weave 2nd cross down with the long side. It has served me well and ensures that everything is tied off on a cross.

To the OP - congrats on your accomplishment. The ATW is a great tool to use in stringing. There really is no right/wrong best/worst for all situations. I'd better a dollar to a doughnut in 6 months you'll be using a variation of what you're doing now even.:)
 
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