I think I'm ready to go back to a heavy (or at least heavier) racquet

bluetrain4

G.O.A.T.
I doubt my story is anything unusual. Grew up playing with heavier frames, which continued into adulthood. When I started playing again in 2004 after a couple years off, I used racquets like Prince Diablo Mid, Dunlop 200 series. Eventually I made my way to Babolat Pure Drive Roddick (now "Tour) - the heaviest Pure Drive - enjoyed the easy power and the frame doing a bit more for me. Used that for a long time, but for some reason moved on to the regular Pure Drive - which had positives and negatives.

Going to return to something heavier next season, but looking at the current frames, the entire weight hierarchy has changed - the heaviest racquet in a line might be only 11.6 or 11.7 oz. There are still 12+ oz offerings, but much fewer than before. Should be fun to see where this takes me.
 

bluetrain4

G.O.A.T.
Honestly I've noticed a bigger difference in going heavier from a swingweight standpoint vs overall weight.

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I'll keep that in mind. The particular regular Pure Drive I've been using is one of the lowest swingweight Pure Drive generations.
 

BBender716

Semi-Pro
why not add lead to the hoop or even an XTP butt cap to extend it 1/2 in and get the swing weight higher and have more plow! very cheap to do and keep the current racquet to boot.
Add lead at 10 and 2 and in the butt cap. That thing will plow.

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fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
I doubt my story is anything unusual. Grew up playing with heavier frames, which continued into adulthood. When I started playing again in 2004 after a couple years off, I used racquets like Prince Diablo Mid, Dunlop 200 series. Eventually I made my way to Babolat Pure Drive Roddick (now "Tour) - the heaviest Pure Drive - enjoyed the easy power and the frame doing a bit more for me. Used that for a long time, but for some reason moved on to the regular Pure Drive - which had positives and negatives.

Going to return to something heavier next season, but looking at the current frames, the entire weight hierarchy has changed - the heaviest racquet in a line might be only 11.6 or 11.7 oz. There are still 12+ oz offerings, but much fewer than before. Should be fun to see where this takes me.
Your story sounds unusually reasonable to me. I switched from hefty wood racquets to my first graphites in high school - early 80's - and I think that my tennis DNA has never really evolved away from them. I've been most comfortable using frames in the neighborhood of 12.5-12.7 oz. for many years and my trials with lighter options have not gone well at all.

Some years back I thought the Head LM Radicals were rather nifty, so I grabbed a pair and then quickly realized just how much I had been benefiting from my heavier rigs. My net game had much less authority, my serves sort of shriveled up, and I generally had to over-swing to produce decent power. Adding lead to the hoops and handles of those racquets helped me get a somewhat better fit with them, but I never really settled in so well with those Radicals.

I made the same mistake last year with a pair of the 16x19 Blade 98 (the 2015 model I think). I've had success with using lead tape on some frames in the past, but these seemed to get worse for me when I tried to tune them. After going back to their stock layout, I injured my shoulder from more of that over-swinging. I don't think that I tore anything up - it seemed to be a case of stress and strain in the back of my shoulder that was alarming for a bit, but it cooled out over several weeks. Lesson learned... finally.

If you're like me, you probably look at any current frames in the 11.5-12.0 oz. range as platforms that you'd need to tune with some lead for a better fit (currently eyeballing the Volkl V-Sense 10 Tours). While the lead tape doesn't work miracles with every frame I experiment with, I've struck on much better than expected results with a couple different racquets through recent history. I don't think that extra weight is anything to be afraid of as long as a frame also has enough head-light balance to be manageable.

Hopefully you enjoy the ride.
 

Fairhit

Professional
I've played with different models from different brands and I always try around the same weight, 300-315g unstrung, I bought a RF97A 2015 because it was obscenely cheap and thought it could be fun to hit with such a heavy frame, a couple weeks ago I practiced with it and it all went well, no pain or disconfort whatsoever so I kept playing with it until the pain or discomfort kicks in, still no sign of any.

Yesterday I started practice with the PS97 and it felt like a toy, I think I'm sold on the heavy frames idea.
 

McGradey

Professional
I turned down heavy racquet road several months ago and from what I can see it seems to be a one way.

I can’t imagine going back to a lighter frame now.
 

Crocodile

Legend
I generally don't trust light frames purely on an arm comfort point of view. What's heavy for each person is a personal thing but for me I like anything over 325g unstrung as a starting point. Don't mind a 320g but then its the extra cost of lead and leather grips.
 

NicoMK

Professional
I too grew up playing in the late 80s with a Rossignol F200 which I recall weighted 374 grams strung. I was 16 :cool: and I think I played with it till I was 21 or 22, long after it was discontinued.

I played with heavy frames for the next 20 years. Two years ago, as I turned 40, I wanted to try something more modern, which means lighter and stiffer. As much as I liked the easy power, I could never adapt to a lighter and stiffer frame.

I developed serious tendinitis from which I haven’t fully recovered yet. Of course I went back to my usual heavy frames and from now, at least till I can handle them, I won’t look back.

This is just my little and insignificant experience but what I wanted to say is that I strongly recommend heavier and flexier frames, depending on your likes of course. But I’m certain that they are better for our body.

Good luck.
 
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joohan

Guest
Leading up a platform racquet might be an option. I see you played with Dunlop 200 series - Srixon 200 Tour might be worth looking at. Good starting numbers in both static weight and swing weight. Angell racquets carry a lot of Dunlop heritage, too.

I’ve heavily customized Dunlop Biomimetic 300 Tour and it might even be the best fir for my game overall. Too bad those frames are hard to come by...
 

NicoMK

Professional
There's already a lot of threads about light VS heavy frames but to sum it up I'd say that a heavy frame is much more compact / stable at impact, which results in much less (bad) vibrations.

Control is much improved and so is comfort.

You may not have this feeling of "easy power" (which most of the time goes along with light and stiff frames) but I'm not sure it means that your ball is slower btw.
 

bluetrain4

G.O.A.T.
People have noted that a lot of old school heavier frames were also more flexible. I actually don't like "flexy" feeling frames (with a few exceptions over the years). I'm talking about the feel, not the RA rating. A low RA frame doesn't have to necessarily feel flexy. I've played with a Prince Graphite OS with a 62-63 RA and always liked it. I guess it comes down to how and where it flexes. I loved my Dunlop Hotmelt 200s and they were fairly low RA. They just felt soft not flexy. The new Clash line feels flexy and I can't stand it, like it's vibrating.
 
J

joohan

Guest
People have noted that a lot of old school heavier frames were also more flexible. I actually don't like "flexy" feeling frames (with a few exceptions over the years). I'm talking about the feel, not the RA rating. A low RA frame doesn't have to necessarily feel flexy. I've played with a Prince Graphite OS with a 62-63 RA and always liked it. I guess it comes down to how and where it flexes. I loved my Dunlop Hotmelt 200s and they were fairly low RA. They just felt soft not flexy. The new Clash line feels flexy and I can't stand it, like it's vibrating.
I’ll use your post to extend my previous one. I mentioned Angell racquet company carrying a lot of Dunlop heritage (only logical since Paul Angell engineered Dunlop products for top players including Hot Melt and Muscle Weave technology) and his custom line is exactly what your talking about - soft while not feeling any flexy hotspots. A nice, uniform flex in 62-63 strung RA range. To balance the scales I will mention I’m not playing with Angells at the moment and that they may be an acquired taste (at least the custom line) but it’s good to know something like that is out there.
 
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