I would like serve & volley better to my opponent slice backhand

Which serve is usually better to serve and volley to his slice bh?

  • Fast

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • Kicker

    Votes: 7 63.6%
  • Fast on fast surfaces kicker on high bouncing surfaces

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • It depends

    Votes: 3 27.3%
  • Other

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    11

toth

Hall of Fame
We both are righties.
He had only slice on his bh wing on return, but he has a good feel even in streching to pass me with his bh slice.
Is there a secret against slicer if i would like serve & volley better?

Thank you for your answer
Toth
 

eah123

Professional
It doesn't make sense that you are being passed with a slice backhand. A slice is slow, which is exactly the kind of return you are looking to volley on.
 
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LuckyR

Legend
Volleys off of slices tend to hit the tape, so aim just a bit higher than normal. However, slices tend to float higher than topspun shots so you likely will be making contact with your volley higher, which means: easier.
 

toth

Hall of Fame
It doesn't make sense that you are being passed with a slice backhand. A slice is slow, which is exactly the kind of return you are looking to volley on.
I think so too
I think he has a good feel on slice, but i dont do my best
Hes slices always crosses a few cm above the net
 

toth

Hall of Fame
Volleys off of slices tend to hit the tape, so aim just a bit higher than normal. However, slices tend to float higher than topspun shots so you likely will be making contact with your volley higher, which means: easier.
His slices crosses the net about a few cm, he has a good feel for it.
His slices are often short if i would stay at the baseline
However i would like to play serve and volley better
 

ppma

Professional
Kick. It's harder to make a good deep low slice from a shoulder or chest type height. Instead you will more likely get a floating ball easier to volley.
 

PRS

Professional
Obviously it can depend on how well he returns each, but my advice would be the kicker. It's slower and gives you more time to close the net, forcing your opponent to hit a better shot in order to successfully pass you since you can cover more angles.
 

ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
For me, most the time I like using kick wide for S&V plays, though I only do it a few times in a match myself. Getting it up high usually gets me a floating ball to move in on, and wide gives me the angle to approach and cut off. So the opponent either has to get out there and hit line and has s small area towards that side to hit, or REALLY get out there to hit on the far side of the ball to make it cross court, and if they usually slice that makes it even harder.
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
It doesn't make sense that you are being passed with a slice backhand. A slice is slow, which is exactly the kind of return you are looking to volley on.
Even if the slice return isn't a hard drive, some returners (not all, but several) can hit with a slice that's really tough to read - no knowing where the ball is going until after it leaves that returner's racquet. The pros will more than rarely pass each other with a slice and make it look easy. Rather the attention-getter when it happens because those guys are so dang fast and also so good at reading opponents as they hit the ball.

Certainly agree that a slow slice return is a nice ball to attack when using serve and volley just as long as it's not that low biting slice that denies the net-rusher a first volley with some authority on it. If the returner generally hits more of a slow, floating slice, that's the ideal ball to go after... and pretty much do it at will.

My general recommendation for playing a S&V style is to be unpredictable to keep a returner off balance and probably more tentative. Maybe sometimes wait to hit an approach shot off the return and then go forward instead of immediately following the serve to the net. That can leave the returner guessing in terms of placement, height, spin, and pace from one return to the next.
We both are righties.
He had only slice on his bh wing on return, but he has a good feel even in streching to pass me with his bh slice.
Is there a secret against slicer if i would like serve & volley better?

Thank you for your answer
Toth
Agree with the kick serve option against a bh slice returner. I'd also say consider swinging a slice (sidespin) serve into that opponent's forehand side at least here and there to better expose his backhand - that's in case you pick on that slice return enough to get him to cheat over to that side a bit to protect it.

The kick serve out to the backhand side can give you lots of returns into what's essentially your wheelhouse for your forehand volley when serving to the ad side, but it might be tougher to pick on returns when serving to the deuce court - that returner may have an easier time with finding your backhand volley. Many folks these days have more trouble with zipping a decent backhand volley than a forehand volley.

If the returns from the deuce side are more tricky, that's where some variety with your attack and placement should be helpful.
 

nyta2

Hall of Fame
generally i like the idea of kick to bh, then s&v, because it gives alot of folks trouble at the 4.5 level, and gives me time to close the net more..
but it depends on the qulity of my kick & and quality of the returner...
against kickers at say the mid 4.5 level, i can often chip & charge, get the ball low to the feet, and force them hit up to me (despite them being the one s&v'ing).
but against, say, high 4.5+ kickers (at some combination of spin/pace/placement/depth/etc... ) i have trouble taking it early to slice it (eg. before it gets above my shoulders) or c&c'ing, because i can't control the spin/pace and/or i'm off balance at contact

Is there a secret against slicer if i would like serve & volley better?
"secret" against any good returner is going to be placement&depth, and how much energy you can put into the ball (pace and spin), and variety.. (eg. making them guess: between body serve & bh serve, or even between slice & kick disguised by your toss location)
 

LuckyR

Legend
His slices crosses the net about a few cm, he has a good feel for it.
His slices are often short if i would stay at the baseline
However i would like to play serve and volley better
Stay at the baseline? Are you hitting approach shots from the baseline?
 

LuckyR

Legend
I am usually hitting approach shots from shorter incoming balls.
I could hit a lot of approach shots from this opponents short slices.
Okay, I think I got it. If you're hitting approaches off of short, low, skidding slices, you're probably hitting severe topspin approaches to get that low ball over the net and back down into the short court. This higher bouncing topspin approach will allow your slicer opponent to contact the ball above net level where he can knife slices into second volley position where you'll have to contact the ball below net level. Which will be a difficult volley to pull off and may pop up for a putaway. The alternative would be to either side spin your approach or even slice it to keep your approach low enough where his slice will be rising when it crosses the net. Those will be easy volleys to punish.
 

toth

Hall of Fame
Okay, I think I got it. If you're hitting approaches off of short, low, skidding slices, you're probably hitting severe topspin approaches to get that low ball over the net and back down into the short court. This higher bouncing topspin approach will allow your slicer opponent to contact the ball above net level where he can knife slices into second volley position where you'll have to contact the ball below net level. Which will be a difficult volley to pull off and may pop up for a putaway. The alternative would be to either side spin your approach or even slice it to keep your approach low enough where his slice will be rising when it crosses the net. Those will be easy volleys to punish.
Sorry, what is happaning is the opposite.
He has trouble high bouncing topserves.
He has a good feel to deel with fast serves.
If i approach from inccoming midcourt ball, i have the advantage close the net more, he rushes more and commit more error.
Definetely it would be a good tactic, stay back more after my serve and wait for a short ball, but it is not the point of this thread.
 

LuckyR

Legend
Sorry, what is happaning is the opposite.
He has trouble high bouncing topserves.
He has a good feel to deel with fast serves.
If i approach from inccoming midcourt ball, i have the advantage close the net more, he rushes more and commit more error.
Definetely it would be a good tactic, stay back more after my serve and wait for a short ball, but it is not the point of this thread.
Ah so. You know the best serve against his slice is the kicker. You just wondered if everyone else would be able to predict that was the situation. Cool.
 

toth

Hall of Fame
Ah so. You know the best serve against his slice is the kicker. You just wondered if everyone else would be able to predict that was the situation. Cool.
I was not sure at all.
I am not a very expeeienced player.
I only play 1-2 times a week and my topspin serve is often not decent enough (depends most on the toss quality)
 

RyanRF

Professional
It depends....

A sliced backhand isn't necessarily a bad backhand. Some players are really good with slice, even when the ball gets higher.
  • Against most players who really just use slice as a defensive blocked last-resort, I say give them kick serves and you're on easy street.
  • If you're against one of the rarer players (usually old-school) who can hit slice aggressively and handle high balls well, then the kick might not work out as well as you like. They might pass you or hit high-to-low slices that go to your feet. Probably better to try more of a flat jamming serve that takes away their time and forces a weaker block.
 
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