If you're going to call a foot fault...

norcal

Legend
...make sure you call it AFTER they hit the serve.

Was watching Mahut/Hebert dubs at the Oz Open and a line judge called a foot fault on their opponent, but the server caught the ball when he heard the line judge call the fault. So the umpire gave him a first serve (hinderance by the line judge I guess).

Mahut couldn't understand how you could get called for a footfault but be awarded a first serve anyways.

There were no commentators so I was trying to hear the conversation to see what was happening. Never saw anything like that. I'm guessing a lot of line judges just watch the foot and call it when the foot touches the line, before the serve is struck...

Anyway, I think I interpreted what happened correctly. It was interesting.
 

kabob

Hall of Fame
It's not a foot fault until the serve motion into the ball starts just like you can't call a ball out until it actually lands out. I've seen pro players start off in foot fault territory and move back to legal during their service motion. Marat Safin, for one, usually had his heel over the center mark on the deuce side but shuffled his back foot forward during his service motion.

EDIT: Clarified first sentence.
 
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Nashvegas

Guest
It's not a foot fault until the serve is struck just like you can't call a ball out until it actually lands out. I've seen pro players start off in foot fault territory and move back to legal during their service motion. Marat Safin, for one, usually had his heel over the center mark on the deuce side but shuffled his back foot forward during his service motion.
I thought you had to start the motion in a non-foot fault position and maintain it. Not true?
 

J D

Semi-Pro
ITF Rules
18. FOOT FAULT
During the service motion, the server shall not:
  1. Change position by walking or running, although slight movements of the feet are permitted; or
  2. Touch the baseline or the court with either foot; or
  3. Touch the area outside the imaginary extension of the sideline with either foot; or
  4. Touch the imaginary extension of the centre mark with either foot.

    If the server breaks this rule it is a “Foot Fault
So, the server's feet are not allowed to touch the line, court, or go over the center line or sideline from the time the service motion starts until the ball is struck. However, it's not a fault unless there is a serve, so ideally linespeople should not call foot fault until after the server swings at the ball.
 
I call foot faults on my opponent in the parking lot. You're telling me that's too early? Guess I'll have to start calling them on him when I serve. I like calling foot faults, they create easy points.
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
It's not a foot fault until the serve is struck just like you can't call a ball out until it actually lands out. I've seen pro players start off in foot fault territory and move back to legal during their service motion. Marat Safin, for one, usually had his heel over the center mark on the deuce side but shuffled his back foot forward during his service motion.
Wrong. Kyrgios just got called on a foot fault (twice actually) for doing just that right now at the AO. If the back foot starts over the center line when you start the motion - even if you move it before you hit the serve (which Nick did) it's a foot fault. And I remember Safin getting called on it too as well as other players. Once you begin the service motion if any foot is in the wrong place at any point it's a foot fault.
 
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kabob

Hall of Fame
Wrong. Kyrgios just got called on a foot fault (twice actually) for doing just that right now at the AO. If the back foot starts over the center line when you start the motion - even if you move it before you hit the serve (which Nick did) it's a foot fault. And I remember Safin getting called on it too as well as other players. Once you begin the service motion if any foot is in the wrong place at any point it's a foot fault.
Not wrong, Until a server starts swinging his racket toward the ball, it's not considered the start of the service motion. If that weren't so, you couldn't catch a ball from an errant toss. As long as a player isn't materially shifting his position from original, you can move your foot some. Kyrgios shifts his positioning sometimes and gets called on it. Try knowing the rules properly next time before bluntly calling someone wrong. See J D's post, he's spot on.
 

kevrol

Hall of Fame
Until a server starts swinging his racket toward the ball, it's not considered the start of the service motion.
Not true as evidenced by the following portion of The Code:

30. Delays during service. When the server’s second service motion is interrupted by a ball coming onto the court, the server is entitled to two serves.

All of the rulings I've seen indicate that even during the toss you are entitled to a first serve in this situation.
 

kabob

Hall of Fame
What does that have anything to do with what I said. If your toss is interrupted, you’re not granted a first serve. That’s not considered the beginning of the service motion.
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
Not wrong, Until a server starts swinging his racket toward the ball, it's not considered the start of the service motion. If that weren't so, you couldn't catch a ball from an errant toss. As long as a player isn't materially shifting his position from original, you can move your foot some. Kyrgios shifts his positioning sometimes and gets called on it. Try knowing the rules properly next time before bluntly calling someone wrong. See J D's post, he's spot on.
Nope. You are 100% wrong. If any part of the foot is over any of the lines - like the center line - at the beginning of the motion even if it's moved by the time the the serve is hit - then it's a foot fault.

The catching of the errant toss isn't a fault because the ball is never struck. So if you are saying that you can start out with your feet in foot fault position and then catch the toss - then yes - it's not a foot fault cause the ball wasn't struck. The foot fault isn't called until the ball is hit - then it's foot fault. But it's not limited to "when the server starts swinging the racket" - It's about the start of the entire service motion. And JD's post says this exactly if you actually read it and understand the words and the order they are in:

"So, the server's feet are not allowed to touch the line, court, or go over the center line or sideline from the time the service motion starts until the ball is struck. However, it's not a fault unless there is a serve, so ideally linespeople should not call foot fault until after the server swings at the ball."

This is exactly what happened to Kyrgios twice. His back foot started over the extension of the center line and he moved it before he started swinging the racket and then he hit the serve - and then he was called on it. Many others have had that happen too.

So you yourself might want to KNOW THE RULES and work on your reading comprehension before you try calling me out.
 
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kabob

Hall of Fame
My god. I'd originally said that it was when it was struck but that's not true because if the server swings and misses the ball, it's still considered a fault. The start of the service motion isn't when the ball is struck, it's when the server starts swinging into the ball. We all know that foot faults are called arbitrarily at the professional level so I wouldn't put any weight on those two instances as being definitive. While you're at it stop being a troll. Aggressive posters like you make this site unpleasant to say the least.
 

kabob

Hall of Fame
From this thread: https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/index.php?threads/foot-fault-clarification.431826/

ITF Rules (date unknown) with USTA Comments

Some USTA Comments on the ITF rules:

Unfortunately the date of these particular ITF rules was not included in the link

http://tennisclub.gsfc.nasa.gov/ITFrules.pdf

Some USTA clarification comments. Pages 14 & 15 0n the serve.

USTA Comment 8.1: What does the rule mean when it says that
the Server may “not change his position by walking or running”? One
key to understanding this rule is to realize that the Server’s feet must be
at rest immediately before beginning to serve. The delivery of the service
then begins with any arm or racket motion and ends when the racket
contacts the ball (or misses the ball in attempt to strike it).

To define walking or running with precision is difficult. This rule is
intended to prevent the Server from taking advantage of the Receiver by
serving while “on the move” and requiring the Receiver to guess the
position from which the serve will be launched, and the rule should be
enforced with that intent in mind.
A Server who takes more than one step with either foot after the
“feet at rest” position described above is at risk for being called
for a foot fault.
The serve becomes a foot fault when, in the
judgment of an experienced official, the Server has materially
changed position before or during any racket or arm motion.

• A Server whose footwork changes significantly from one serve
to the next is at risk for being called for a foot fault.
• Serves that look like the running volleyball serve violate the
rule. Serves in which the Server runs or walks from a point
well behind the baseline to the baseline are also illegal, as are
serves in which the Server walks or runs along the baseline before
choosing a spot from which to deliver the serve.
USTA Comment 8.2: When does a foot fault occur? A player commits
a foot fault if after the player’s feet are at rest but before the player
strikes the ball, either foot touches:
• the Court, including the baseline;
• any part of the imaginary extension of the center mark; or
• beyond the imaginary extension of the outside of the singles
sideline in singles or the doubles sideline in doubles.
USTA Comment 8.3: Is it a foot fault if the Server’s foot touches
the baseline and then the Server catches the tossed ball instead of attempting
to strike it? This is not a foot fault as long as the Server makes
no attempt to strike the ball.

USTA Comment 8.4: May a player ask an official how he foot faulted?
Yes. The official should then give a brief answer.
USTA Comment 8.5: When may the Receiver or the Receiver’s
partner call foot faults? In a non-officiated match, the Receiver or the
Receiver’s partner may call foot faults after all efforts (appeal to the
Server’s request for an official) have failed and the foot faulting is flagrant
as to clearly perceptible from the Receiver’s side.

All is all, the ITF rule could be more precisely stated. Being stationary before the service motion begins then requires a definition of what the 'beginning of the service motion' is. For example, stand stationary 10 steps back from the baseline and then 'begin the service motion' by running up to the baseline.....?

A point of interest - in the 1960s or 1970s the rule for serving was changed to allow jumping off the ground while impacting the ball. Before that one or both feet had to be in contact with the ground.
 

DNShade

Hall of Fame
My god. I'd originally said that it was when it was struck but that's not true because if the server swings and misses the ball, it's still considered a fault. The start of the service motion isn't when the ball is struck, it's when the server starts swinging into the ball. We all know that foot faults are called arbitrarily at the professional level so I wouldn't put any weight on those two instances as being definitive. While you're at it stop being a troll. Aggressive posters like you make this site unpleasant to say the least.
I'm trolling? I'm an aggressive poster? Are you kidding me? Do you read what some people post out here? Ha ha

I've was giving information that is correct. I'm not being aggressive at all. I was just kinda responding to you and your "aggressive" post where you said to me and I quote:

"Try knowing the rules properly next time before bluntly calling someone wrong."

I do know the rules. Very, very well. Have been around at the top level of ATP/WTA for decades and coached at top acadmies and know what I'm talking about. Those two instances as you call them - are just the most recent of many that I have witnessed first hand many, many times.

You say foot faults are called arbitrarily at the professional level Ah, no. Quite the opposite. It is just rare that a professional player - especially the ones you see on TV - actually foot faults, not that officials don't call them. Try playing a professional tournament with professional officials and linesmen and and see how many foot faults you can get away with and see how arbitrary it seems then. I'm guessing you haven't done that. I have.

And what are you trying to say with the bolded part?

The delivery of the service then begins with any arm or racket motion and ends when the racket
contacts the ball (or misses the ball in attempt to strike it).

Exactly. The motion begins not when the racket is swung at the ball - but when the server starts to move period. The take back or beginning of the motion at all is considered the delivery of the service. And if any part of the foot is over the line (centerline as well) even if it is moved back into a non foot fault position during the motion before the stick is swung to hit the ball it is still considered a foot fault. And called as soon as the ball is struck.

Now to the OP original circumstance where the foot fault is called before the ball is struck - and if the toss is caught before the racket is actually swung up to hit the ball then it isn't a foot fault and yes he would get a first serve if he was hitting a first when the premature call was made.

I wasn't arguing anything about that - I was just responding to your post where you said -

"Marat Safin, for one, usually had his heel over the center mark on the deuce side but shuffled his back foot forward during his service motion."

That as described would be a foot fault and I've seen Marat called on it in person and he wasn't a fan believe me - but the call was correct.

I was just trying to clarify the rules so actual information gets posted out here.

So just chill - all good. I just hate seeing incorrect information floating around.
 

kabob

Hall of Fame
At one point, you said the start is when the server makes contact with the ball. That's the end of the service motion. Anyways, it's all good. Thanks for making it right. You're right, I'm just used to so many a-hole posters on this board and can get my back up quicker than I should.
 

woodrow1029

Hall of Fame
...make sure you call it AFTER they hit the serve.

Was watching Mahut/Hebert dubs at the Oz Open and a line judge called a foot fault on their opponent, but the server caught the ball when he heard the line judge call the fault. So the umpire gave him a first serve (hinderance by the line judge I guess).

Mahut couldn't understand how you could get called for a footfault but be awarded a first serve anyways.

There were no commentators so I was trying to hear the conversation to see what was happening. Never saw anything like that. I'm guessing a lot of line judges just watch the foot and call it when the foot touches the line, before the serve is struck...

Anyway, I think I interpreted what happened correctly. It was interesting.
Yes that is what the call was. It doesn’t happen often. But it does happen.

I was a chair umpire at an ATP challenger in New York once. James Blake was playing someone. Blake was complaining several times that the other guy was foot faulting on the center serve mark. Tough call from the chair, and the line umpire calling the center line was calling on the receivers side, so it’s a long way calling through the net.

After Blake complained several times, the line umpire did actually call one late in the second set, but he called it before the player hit the hall. So it became a first serve. Blake laughed it off because he was winning pretty easily.
 

Max G.

Legend
Heh. That seems pretty normal for a rec foot fault unfortunately. I think like half of the 4.0-4.5 players I play with footfault that bad... I hope I'm not one of them but I don't really know since I'm not looking at my feet while I serve.
 

S&V-not_dead_yet

Talk Tennis Guru
Heh. That seems pretty normal for a rec foot fault unfortunately. I think like half of the 4.0-4.5 players I play with footfault that bad... I hope I'm not one of them but I don't really know since I'm not looking at my feet while I serve.
One word: video.
 

Bluefan75

Professional
I wonder if anyone foot faults like the guy in white shorts in this match? He is a supposed 5.0. Would you call him on it?

I think the problem is, can you tell from the other end? how do you know it's a half a foot vs a toe. If I could go to the video you're darn right I call it. I'm trying to keep my serve in while respecting the rules, you're darn straight it will be expected in return.

But just being the guy on the other side of the net, there's a lot you have to "risk" (for lack of a better word) to make that call. It's not like one guy I saw who was taking two steps in before serving. He was insane, but I wasn't playing against him.

If I'm playing buddies, I will tell them on a changeover, especially the crossing of the center line.
 

norcal

Legend
Yeah I would never notice unless someone watching told me. If it were a USTA match I would tell him he's foot faulting on every serve (because I know I don't foot fault).

No big deal, he just kind of shuffles onto the line, just start a little back. The bad ones take a big momentum step into the court (often in dubs for s&v). And they get pissed when called on it.
 

kylebarendrick

Professional
Most people step onto the line or turn their foot onto it during their motion. On some of those serves he starts with his foot on the line. There's no excuse for that. He either does it on purpose or just doesn't care. If I noticed I'd tell him to knock it off.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
I'd never notice that degree of foot faulting from the opposite side. In doubles as the receivers partner I'd likely notice it and mention it in changeover. if he got all pissy about it, I'd start calling him on it.
 

OrangePower

Legend
I'd never notice that degree of foot faulting from the opposite side. In doubles as the receivers partner I'd likely notice it and mention it in changeover. if he got all pissy about it, I'd start calling him on it.
I don't think I'd notice it as receivers partner either. Even if I did, I wouldn't mention it unless it's a teammate, in which case I'd point out that in officiated play (eg Districts) it would get called.
 

Bobs tennis

Semi-Pro
I played at a facility where everyone seemed to footfault. I had been invited to play someone that I only knew casually. While watching a match that was finishing up I mentioned it to someone standing next to me and was told it's no big thing. As we started to play I noticed clearly that my opponent was moving his left foot almost a foot forward during his motion. I brought it to his attention on the change over but got no response. It continued and we were at 4-4 with my serve so I stepped up to the service line and served. He immediately asked what I was doing. I asked how far over the line can I start my serve. The group watching chuckled, the foot faults stopped, but I never got a call to play there again.
 

tegg96

Semi-Pro
One thing about foot fault that I find strange is, the rule is setup obviously so as you cannot gain a serve advantage by being closer in the court while serving. The slightest touch of the baseline or imaginary centerline extension is deemed a foot fault. But the thing is if your a younger athletic player or pro you can break this rule by initiating a massive forward jump. Often pros feet are a foot or even half a meter inside the baseline when the ball is struck. There feet are in mid air at impact but really I think this is bending the rules.

I think the rule should be the baseline should also have an imaginary vertical line that cannot be crossed even with feet in the air at ball impact.
 
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Nashvegas

Guest
One thing about foot fault that I find strange is, the rule is setup obviously so as you cannot gain a serve advantage by being closer in the court while serving. The slightest touch of the baseline or imaginary centerline extension is deemed a foot fault. But the thing is if your a younger athletic player or pro you can break this rule by initiating a massive forward jump. Often pros feet are a foot or even half a meter inside the baseline when the ball is struck. There feet are in mid air at impact but really I think this is bending the rules.

I think the rule should be the baseline should also have an imaginary vertical line that cannot be crossed even with feet in the air at ball impact.
Long ago you couldn’t jump on the serve.

It would be very difficult for the linesperson to enforce the rule you describe.

In a match with no linesperson you’ll be the one following the rule while your opponent dives into the court on his serve. How would you be able to call him on it?
 

Bluefan75

Professional
One thing about foot fault that I find strange is, the rule is setup obviously so as you cannot gain a serve advantage by being closer in the court while serving. The slightest touch of the baseline or imaginary centerline extension is deemed a foot fault. But the thing is if your a younger athletic player or pro you can break this rule by initiating a massive forward jump. Often pros feet are a foot or even half a meter inside the baseline when the ball is struck. There feet are in mid air at impact but really I think this is bending the rules.

I think the rule should be the baseline should also have an imaginary vertical line that cannot be crossed even with feet in the air at ball impact.
I'm not so sure about that. I know for me, staying more vertical has really improved my serve. You have to make some real adjustments to pull it off successfully. Pros can, sure, but they also have serious time to work on stuff like that.

Not to mention, everything is based on where the ground is touched. You could hover a leg over the imaginary center line and it would not be a fault. No different than hoops saving the ball out of bounds. If you're airborne the whole time, you're still established inbounds.
 

nastynick

New User
I hate it when guys make foot faults. When calling them, I often get the answer: "we’re not professionals". To which I reply that I expect my shots to be called in if they are out by a few cm, as this is negligible and as we aren’t pros!

Upon an opponent stepping onto the line by 10 cm complaining about my foot fault calls (I usually watch closely the service motion before the start of a match to get an idea), I ended up serving with my foot well on the line.

Believe it or not, the guy still wasn’t happy because, he claimed to "at least starting his movement outside and only faulting when hitting the ball".
 

Bluefan75

Professional
I hate it when guys make foot faults. When calling them, I often get the answer: "we’re not professionals". To which I reply that I expect my shots to be called in if they are out by a few cm, as this is negligible and as we aren’t pros!

Upon an opponent stepping onto the line by 10 cm complaining about my foot fault calls (I usually watch closely the service motion before the start of a match to get an idea), I ended up serving with my foot well on the line.

Believe it or not, the guy still wasn’t happy because, he claimed to "at least starting his movement outside and only faulting when hitting the ball".
If you can recall the AFLAC commercial with Yogi Berra, my reaction to the guy's claims is very similar to the duck in the commercial.
 

NTRPolice

Hall of Fame
The difficulty in calling a FF is that it doesnt need to be called once they strike, or have struck the ball.

It's technically called the instant they make an attempt to hit the ball, which isnt necessarily the same thing as "tossing" or even coiling of the body even though those things are in the "service motion".

The call is supposed to be made right before impact, so there's no taking it back. The timing is tricky.
 

r2473

G.O.A.T.
I wonder if anyone foot faults like the guy in white shorts in this match?

That is exactly how I footfault.

When I’ve been called on it in a tournament, I just move back a foot behind the line to start my serve. Can’t ever recall anyone saying anything. I’m sure everyone knows I footfault.

It wouldn’t bother me in the slightest to see my opponent doing that.
 

WhiteOut

Semi-Pro
That is exactly how I footfault.

When I’ve been called on it in a tournament, I just move back a foot behind the line to start my serve. Can’t ever recall anyone saying anything. I’m sure everyone knows I footfault.

It wouldn’t bother me in the slightest to see my opponent doing that.
But this is what i just don't understand (and I'm genuinely curious -- not trying to start a flame thing): if a player *knows* he has a tendency to consistently FF, and he knows it's a rule not to, why not just play the game without doing it in the first place? Why not just start the few inches behind the line in the first place to avoid the whole thing altogether? It makes absolutely no sense to me all this dialogue on the board along the lines of, 'yeah I know I do it, I just keep doing it till someone says something.'

To me the rule is also in place as a matter of courtesy to both players, and I do think it can give the the server an advantage, albeit a psychological one. Consider this: When I'm playing a match, I'm trying to create an atmosphere where both me and my opponent are able to test our skills against one another in a way that is 'comfortable' and without any outside drama. Obviously a minor disagreement may happen 1-2 times thru the course of a match, and we deal with it like friends or don't even bring it up at all if it appears it's just a matter of seeing it differently (like a close line call 1-2 times per match). People are trying to just play, but also stay within the rules. So the problem is, when folks take advantage of a situation like this, knowingly or unknowingly, it makes *me* the nit-picky tight-ass if I say something, even to be helpful to the other player. To even put me, the person following the rule, in that situation in the first place, seems unfair to me. Now *I'm* spending half a match wondering if I should say something or not, or if I should just start being selective with other rules, since, you see, they don't really seem to matter...Does that make sense?

For the record, the FF itself doesn't bother me, and I rarely say something during a match, unless the opp is being a jerk in other ways. In the 10 years I've been playing, I've mentioned something only 2-3 times after a match, just as a matter of trying to help, and only once during a match to the server's partner quietly during a change over (that one was really bad -- like a full step about 2 ft into the court before striking the ball).

It's the internal conversation that I'm now having, even for a game or two, that is a distraction, and to me, *that* is the unfair part -- if I'm knowingly FF'ing and putting my opp in this position, I am taking advantage of their kindness of not saying anything ... does this make sense?

I had this situation happen a few weeks back: I was not playing, but watching one of my team's courts (and i'm very friendly with the other team's cap). opp player ff easily 1/2-full foot inside the court (our team won that court but lost the team match). after the match, was chatting with the other cap (they are in contention to advance): "hey btw, your guy on court 2 is massively ff'ing on every serve, especially on the deuce side. just letting you know since you'll likely advance. those roaming umps will call it, and of course it'll be at a critical time in the match." he thanked me for the tip, but his guy walks up as i'm finishing my sentence -- "yeah you're just saying that bc you guys lost'...wft - whatever dude...just trying to help the guy out...

I look at it is as one less rule to think about. The alternative is, player A FF all he wants, as far or as little into the court as he wants, and in retaliation, player B gets to call balls out that are in by about the same amount. Because, you know, it doesn't really give anyone an advantage until someone says something anyway...i'm pretty sure no one would go for that, and would make for a really unpleasant match imo...

everyone seems to think it's not big deal, because no one wants to be seen as a bad-guy for calling it. Yet here we are 37 posts deep into a thread about it...so it clearly *is* an issue...So I say, let's play within the rules, don't FF, call it if you see it like anything else, or at least give a friendly warning. If enough people did this, I don't think there would be so much ambiguity and discussion about FF'ing. it would be just like any other line call...
 

pcs

New User
I've had this discussion many times with my tennis buddies. Some people get pretty worked up, whether it's because their opponent foot faults, someone has told them that they do or they have been called for it.

I'm confident I don't foot fault, so no worry there for me. But as for my opponent, my position is and always has been this: I ignore it. Not only do I ignore it, I don't even look to see if they doing it. Frankly, I don't care and don't want to know anyhow. I'm not going to call it on anyone (it will just open up the possibility of retaliatory obscure rule calls against me) and they're simply not getting enough of an advantage doing it to bother putting a stop to it anyway. If I know about it and start thinking about whether to call it or not or the fight that will come up if I do, then I'm thinking about all of that and not on playing tennis. I need to be thinking about playing tennis. Beat ém anyway, I say.
 

ShaunS

Semi-Pro
That is exactly how I footfault.

When I’ve been called on it in a tournament, I just move back a foot behind the line to start my serve. Can’t ever recall anyone saying anything. I’m sure everyone knows I footfault.

It wouldn’t bother me in the slightest to see my opponent doing that.
I'm sorry to go off-topic, but I'm confused by this video. These guys seem like mid-level 4.0 singles, but I admittedly haven't watched a lot of Youtube tennis videos. Am I off-base?

The older guy in white shorts isn't getting any real benefit from the foot fault, so it wouldn't be a problem for me. In normal league play it's not something I'm going to hardly ever call for a few reasons, but I'd probably mention it to them afterward to see if they know they're doing it. Not in a snarky way, but genuinely curious, because I find most people are aware and really don't care enough to stop.

As for the reasons... I don't think most people who are foot faulting are actually benefiting. They're often doing weird things that keep them from generating proper lift or getting any torque, so why stop them? That said, I've seen some male players who got both feet into the court before contact, and at that point we've devolved into anarchy.
 

r2473

G.O.A.T.
But this is what i just don't understand (and I'm genuinely curious -- not trying to start a flame thing): if a player *knows* he has a tendency to consistently FF, and he knows it's a rule not to, why not just play the game without doing it in the first place? Why not just start the few inches behind the line in the first place to avoid the whole thing altogether? It makes absolutely no sense to me all this dialogue on the board along the lines of, 'yeah I know I do it, I just keep doing it till someone says something.'
It's just habit to use the line to lineup with for the serve. Nothing more. I guess I should form a new habit. But it never comes up, except in a few tournaments.
 

kylebarendrick

Professional
I played a guy recently that served from outside the doubles alley. This helped him hit angled serves that were challenging to reach. In this case, while I didn't call a FF, I did point out that he isn't allowed to serve from there. His serving position was definitely giving him an advantage and I was done putting up with it. Turns out lots of people don't know that rule.
 

CdnUmp

New User
I played a guy recently that served from outside the doubles alley. This helped him hit angled serves that were challenging to reach. In this case, while I didn't call a FF, I did point out that he isn't allowed to serve from there. His serving position was definitely giving him an advantage and I was done putting up with it. Turns out lots of people don't know that rule.
Yep. Foot faults on the baseline are pretty intuitive; however, foot faults on the sidelines or centre service line are a little more nuanced. The rule states that a serve must go to the opposite court. This means that a player may stap on the imaginary extension of the sideline (singles line in singles or doubles line in doubles), but may not touch the imaginary extension of the centre service line, since the centre service line is considered to be part of both courts, and the serve would no longer be going into the opposite court. Centre serve foot faults are rarely called in pro matches unless there are 9 line umpires, since the umpire calling the centre service line must call the foot fault throught he net and their vision is obstructed by the strap and they're focusing on the line and the incoming serve. I have seen it while roving on a few occasions with younger juniors and older seniors who need a reminder of the rules.
 
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