Im a 4.0, and I've only ever used the same racket. Am I crazy?

megamind

Hall of Fame
Well, ok I lied, a beginner's racket for like a year and a half, and then a normal/professional Babolat racket for about a decade

I see all these other 4.0s with their big expensive bags full of rackets, some of them change their racket every year or two even.

and I'm out here with 1

I have broken my strings during a match multiple times before, but have always found someone else's racket to continue playing (guess I've been lucky), but at times a different racket does throw me off I'll admit it

so, why would I or anyone consider getting a new racket? what's the benefit?



I do change my strings every month or two (depending on how much tennis play))
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
Well, ok I lied, a beginner's racket for like a year and a half, and then a normal/professional Babolat racket for about a decade

I see all these other 4.0s with their big expensive bags full of rackets, some of them change their racket every year or two even.

and I'm out here with 1

I have broken my strings during a match multiple times before, but have always found someone else's racket to continue playing (guess I've been lucky), but at times a different racket does throw me off I'll admit it

so, why would I or anyone consider getting a new racket? what's the benefit?



I do change my strings every month or two (depending on how much tennis play))
you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.
 

FRV2

Professional
I would get another identical racket if you could afford one. Having 3 would probably be ideal, just so you could feel cool, but 2 probably suffices if you don't break the string more than once a match.
 

Legend of Borg

G.O.A.T.
you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.
is this really true?

sounds like a myth that racket companies can use to their advantage
 

TennisHound

Legend
Wow, T2PS and Fedace with back to back posts? This trolling is stronger g with these two. Kind of a weak topic anyway
 

parasailing

Hall of Fame
Some of us here on the forum are racquet holics who love to try different racquets for fun.

There is nothing wrong with sticking to the same racquet or buying tons of racquets.

Too each their own.
 

dak95_00

Hall of Fame
Never change. If you do you’ll find yourself on a lifelong quest to find the holy grail of strings and racquet.
 

kailash

Professional
Well, ok I lied, a beginner's racket for like a year and a half, and then a normal/professional Babolat racket for about a decade

I see all these other 4.0s with their big expensive bags full of rackets, some of them change their racket every year or two even.

and I'm out here with 1

I have broken my strings during a match multiple times before, but have always found someone else's racket to continue playing (guess I've been lucky), but at times a different racket does throw me off I'll admit it

so, why would I or anyone consider getting a new racket? what's the benefit?



I do change my strings every month or two (depending on how much tennis play))
Some folks on this forum change their racquets every few months! Why? Many chase something called "the holy grail" thinking that it will improve their game; the truth is that it doesn't exist in reality.

You are NOT crazy; actually you are really sane; don't believe in all the hypes and marketing.

That said, for different types of playing styles, certain type of racquets work well. For example, all court, baseline, spinny vs flat hitter etc; different specs for different styles and individual physique. If you are really interested (tempted :)), do some demos and see if any specific racket enhances your game. Then if you really like any of those new ones, get 2; having at least 2 helps in situations like the string breaking.
 

megamind

Hall of Fame
Some folks on this forum change their racquets every few months! Why? Many chase something called "the holy grail" thinking that it will improve their game; the truth is that it doesn't exist in reality.

You are NOT crazy; actually you are really sane; don't believe in all the hypes and marketing.

That said, for different types of playing styles, certain type of racquets work well. For example, all court, baseline, spinny vs flat hitter etc; different specs for different styles and individual physique. If you are really interested (tempted :)), do some demos and see if any specific racket enhances your game. Then if you really like any of those new ones, get 2; having at least 2 helps in situations like the string breaking.

Makes sense

2 rackets does seem worthwhile, amd my current racket is too old to find a similar replacement
 

megamind

Hall of Fame
you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.

Hmmmm... I tend to think improving my technique and fitness would improve my game more

But maybe you’re right, maybe I should demo some rackets
 

chrisb

Semi-Pro
you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.
no u wont u might get hawthorne effect but that wears off improve your groundies and get a good second serve will help more
 

Dartagnan64

Legend
A) Sometimes you get an arm injury from and racket and need a arm-friendlier solution
B) Tennis is a feel sport and if the ball feels good coming off the strings, then you feel good. Finding a racquet that offers nice feel on serves, groundies and volleys makes tennis fun.
C) Sometimes technology does make a difference.
 

tenapasi

Rookie
No, you don't need to change. My friends, whose around 4.5, still using the same old Aero Pro and Pure Drive. And a couple of friends who still using old Head Instinct.

I think there are two conditions you should switched.
1. Better racquet to suite your style of play.
I started tennis with old WIlson 110sq. Then, after my game (and level) progressing, i switched to RDiS 100 Mid. Felt too demanding, switched to Pure Drive Plus. At this moment, my style of play got shaped. So i switched to 360 Speed Pro. Which was a mistake. But lesson i got, now i understand what racquet spec that suited my game. Ended up with 360 Extreme Pro. Which better suited for my game.

2. Your broke your racquet.
Frame cracked, destroyed racquet, well... you get the idea. :)

you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.
You're right. I can feel the frame fatigue on my friend old Aero Pro drive. But for me, it doesn't bother me a lot. I just need to adjust a bit. And power and control still there.
As for the Head Instinct racquet, i don't feel much different if i compare it with my 360 Extreme Pro. Although he (sometimes) likes to smack his racquet to the ground if he misses volley. :laughing:
 

stephenclown

Professional
you need to go buy a new racket immediately. it will catapult you to 4.5. As so many of the pros like Kerber, Zeverev, and Federer said, after about 5-6 month, frame loses power and accuracy due to loss of intergrity of graphite. so this means for the amateurs, you need to buy a new racket about eveyru 1-2 years depending on how much you play.
So go and buy a new racket and you will play Better immediately.
Pro's use their frames for an hour before restrings and in 6 months probably go through a few dozen restrings on a racquet and are acutely aware of their equipment. They also hit the ball with pace that most people could only dream about. Given this, I doubt the average player will notice any difference between a 5 year old frame that has been strung every couple months and one that is new other than placebo. The most important thing is to know your equipment inside and out and to be able to use this to the best of your ability. I remember reading some pros specifically ask for their racquets to be strung to lower RA instead of playing with them new.

Babolat official caimed that they string their frames a hundred + times in order to get low 60's RA for their top players if they want. Federer has always played mid 60's stiffness so what he perceives as a loss of power/accuracy might not be for everyone. They just play differently to what he was used to and consequently needed to change for his specific stroke. It took him over a year to get used to his RF97 so I am confident that the change was not detrimental to the frame but only for him to play at his absolute peak - which no one on this forum will ever come close to.
 

blablavla

Professional
tennis rackets aren't indestructible. they are made of graphite matrix. over time with countless tennis hitting, they start to weaken and you lose power and control.
perhaps.
but, the pros you mention:
1. train much more hours per day / week / month as opposed to the recreational players
2. hit the ball much harder, both pace generation + spin
3. face much harder incoming balls
so, just because top pros might need to replace the racket every 6 months, it doesn't mean that my racket becomes unplayable 6 months after purchase.


Now coming back to the poster, there are more than 1 racket in the bag.
Let's say they all are being re-strung once per month on average.
That means 12 stringjobs / year.
As some say, you need approx 100 stringjobs, before the frame starts losing RA and becomes softer.
So, that means roughly 8 years.
And let's keep in mind that the poster started with a Babolat, though didn't mention which one, but probably rather stiff one.
Which means that when it starts losing stiffness, it becomes a tad more arm-friendly.
As long as the feel with current frame is there, I don't see how a new racket is going to pummel the poster into the ATP league.
 
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Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
perhaps.
but, the pros you mention:
1. train much more hours per day / week / month as opposed to the recreational players
2. hit the ball much harder, both pace generation + spin
3. face much harder incoming balls
so, just because top pros might need to replace the racket every 6 months, it doesn't mean that my racket becomes unplayable 6 months after purchase.


Now coming back to the poster, there are more than 1 racket in the bag.
Let's say they all are being re-strung once per month on average.
That means 12 stringjobs / year.
As some say, you need approx 100 stringjobs, before the frame starts losing RA and becomes softer.
So, that means roughly 8 years.
And let's keep in mind that the poster started with a Babolat, though didn't mention which one, but probably rather stiff one.
Which means that when it starts losing stiffness, it becomes a tad more arm-friendly.
As long as the feel with current frame is there, I don't see how a new racket is going to pummel the poster into the ATP league.
WRONG................ string jobs are only part of the equation. playing style and how often you play ADDS to the stress on the racket so that significantly affects frame's intergrity. more often you play more often you have to replace rackets. I string about 2 times per month and play 2 times a week. and I have to change rackets about once a year or once every other year. and throw away or sell the old racket I have.
 

blablavla

Professional
WRONG................ string jobs are only part of the equation. playing style and how often you play ADDS to the stress on the racket so that significantly affects frame's intergrity. more often you play more often you have to replace rackets. I string about 2 times per month and play 2 times a week. and I have to change rackets about once a year or once every other year. and throw away or sell the old racket I have.
you're a good customer for the racket manufacturing companies.
that's your choice.

There are plenty of people playing good to solid level with old frames.
So I am afraid that the empirical data that I see is strongly contradicting your arguments.

Remember, the bumblebees, at some point in time, were not supposed to fly according to the aerodynamic rules known to humans.
Luckily bumblebees aren't aware of this and they fly.
Till some human can explain it.
That's the power of empirical data. If it happens massively, not as an exception, then your knowledge is wrong.
 

Anton

Legend
Well, ok I lied, a beginner's racket for like a year and a half, and then a normal/professional Babolat racket for about a decade

I see all these other 4.0s with their big expensive bags full of rackets, some of them change their racket every year or two even.

and I'm out here with 1

I have broken my strings during a match multiple times before, but have always found someone else's racket to continue playing (guess I've been lucky), but at times a different racket does throw me off I'll admit it

so, why would I or anyone consider getting a new racket? what's the benefit?



I do change my strings every month or two (depending on how much tennis play))
Go on fleabay and get yourself another racket just like your first one, so when you pop the strings you have a backup.

What racket do you have BTW?
 

max

Legend
I used a Dunlop Max 200 G for about ten years, then, wanting more power on serve, switched to a Volkl C-9, which I used for about 20 years, eventually leading it up a good bit. These have faded and me, too, and I could use a bit more power, so I've opted to go Prince recently.

Yeah. It's REALLY HELPFUL to be familiar with what your racquet can do with you as its driver.
 

Anton

Legend
WRONG................ string jobs are only part of the equation. playing style and how often you play ADDS to the stress on the racket so that significantly affects frame's intergrity. more often you play more often you have to replace rackets. I string about 2 times per month and play 2 times a week. and I have to change rackets about once a year or once every other year. and throw away or sell the old racket I have.
So you re-string after 2 outtings or about 5 hours?

You must be a near tour level player.
 

blablavla

Professional
So you re-string after 2 outtings or about 6 hours?

Thats nuts.
According to Tennis Warehouse Forum keyboard warriors, if you don't brake the strings in 2 hours maximum, you can't hit. Ideally you break your strings in 15-30 minutes. Maximum 1 hour.

Another wisdom is that you absolutely can't play more than 6-10 hours with same strings.
Further restrictions apply.
It doesn't matter if you play or not, the tension loss makes the stringbed / racket totally unplayable in like 1 week? maximum 2 weeks.
If you don't feel this, you absolutely can't play tennis.
So you need to go and buy a new racket + new strings, and this will immediately proper you to the ATP Tour level.
 

Anton

Legend
According to Tennis Warehouse Forum keyboard warriors, if you don't brake the strings in 2 hours maximum, you can't hit. Ideally you break your strings in 15-30 minutes. Maximum 1 hour.

Another wisdom is that you absolutely can't play more than 6-10 hours with same strings.
Further restrictions apply.
It doesn't matter if you play or not, the tension loss makes the stringbed / racket totally unplayable in like 1 week? maximum 2 weeks.
If you don't feel this, you absolutely can't play tennis.
So you need to go and buy a new racket + new strings, and this will immediately proper you to the ATP Tour level.
I get ~15 hours out of my poly stringbeds even in something like ~350SW Pure Aero, though I do string them proportional method, which allows higher tension in the center for control and looser outsides for more comfort.

If you get the tension right by the time poly strings are badly notched the tension has fallen just low enough to still allow plenty of string snap-back, so it plays very good all the way until it pops. Also, if at some point you feel the friction is getting bad there is a quick fix - rubbing on a bit of silicone lubricant will get your strings sliding like new again.
 

blablavla

Professional
I get ~15 hours out of my poly stringbeds even in something like ~350SW Pure Aero, though I do string them proportional method, which allows higher tension in the center for control and looser outsides for more comfort.

If you get the tension right by the time poly strings are badly notched the tension has fallen just low enough to still allow plenty of string snap-back, so it plays very good all the way until it pops. Also, if at some point you feel the friction is getting bad there is a quick fix - rubbing on a bit of silicone lubricant will get your strings sliding like new again.
it was sarcasm from my side ;)
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
So you re-string after 2 outtings or about 5 hours?

You must be a near tour level player.
I restring about every 6-10 hours of play. I restring once every 2 weeks and I play about 2 times a week, sometimes more 3-4 times a week. 2 hours each, that's like 8 to 14 hours of play. These Polyester string go dead after about 6-8 hours of play and caused big time Arm problems and shoulder problems. So I don't have a choice and I love Poly too much due to my heavy reliance on Topspin.

Anyway, I change rackets about once a year to once every 2 years. If you play 3-4 times a week, your racket will lose Significant amount of graphite fiber Intergrity in about 2 years. This is known scientific fact.
 

blablavla

Professional
I restring about every 6-10 hours of play. I restring once every 2 weeks and I play about 2 times a week, sometimes more 3-4 times a week. 2 hours each, that's like 8 to 14 hours of play. These Polyester string go dead after about 6-8 hours of play and caused big time Arm problems and shoulder problems. So I don't have a choice and I love Poly too much due to my heavy reliance on Topspin.

Anyway, I change rackets about once a year to once every 2 years. If you play 3-4 times a week, your racket will lose Significant amount of graphite fiber Intergrity in about 2 years. This is known scientific fact.
I won't say "WRONG" as others do, but I wouldn't generalize.

Just like @Anton pointed out, some players play more than 8-10 hours from a poly string.
I recently had a case, when my beloved poly was still alive loooong after I expected the strings to break.
And I had both: good control + good speed.
1. @Nostradamus Shall I cut the strings simply because I pass over the 10 hours mark?

2. It is my second full year with the set of 3 frames.
And I play better than at the point in time when I purchased them.
@Nostradamus shall I throw them away because Federer and Nadal change their frames every 6 months?
 

Nostradamus

Bionic Poster
I won't say "WRONG" as others do, but I wouldn't generalize.

Just like @Anton pointed out, some players play more than 8-10 hours from a poly string.
I recently had a case, when my beloved poly was still alive loooong after I expected the strings to break.
And I had both: good control + good speed.
1. @Nostradamus Shall I cut the strings simply because I pass over the 10 hours mark?

2. It is my second full year with the set of 3 frames.
And I play better than at the point in time when I purchased them.
@Nostradamus shall I throw them away because Federer and Nadal change their frames every 6 months?
YES, I would cut them out after 10 hour mark. Yes, I understand that every poly string is different. but for me, Luxilon, Solinco, Tourna Big hitter all go dead after 10 hours of play. and for the rackets, after 2 years, if you feel like they are still good, then keep playing with them. you probably don't play as much or hit as hard, or string as often...
 

blablavla

Professional
YES, I would cut them out after 10 hour mark. Yes, I understand that every poly string is different. but for me, Luxilon, Solinco, Tourna Big hitter all go dead after 10 hours of play. and for the rackets, after 2 years, if you feel like they are still good, then keep playing with them. you probably don't play as much or hit as hard, or string as often...
Usually I don't have to ask myself if the stringbed is too old or not. As I do hit hard, and the Pure Aero pattern is fairly open, the stringbed rarely lives past 10 hours. Sometimes I'll use 3 rackets within 4 hours of training as 2 stringbeds were broken.
But I will keep the stringbed as long as it helps me with speed and control. That's why I purchased the strings. It's not about ticking the hours played.
And if it doesn't, I'll cut it even if it is a brand new stringing.

Of course as long as my racket allows me to play well, I will keep it.
 
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