Interesting UTR Match - Adult against 9 year old

Cashman

Hall of Fame


Interesting. I'm not sure what I think of these sorts of tournaments.

I'd hazard a guess that maybe they are not awesome for the child's skill development, and personally I prefer to share a beer rather than a juice box with my opponents after a match.
 
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Addxyz

Professional
Not sure if Jeb posts around here, but I liked this video, but love that UTR level is the main focus in the competition.


Just thought this could use some views and comments.
She plays amazing for a 9 year old. UTR 2 is what- NTRP 3?
 

Return_Ace

Hall of Fame
I remember coming across one of his videos when I was looking for more opinions on the Gravity Pro.

Started watching and then just got puzzled as to why this was the racket he chose, it's definitely not a racket that I would say was on my list for recommending at his level of play and literally any other racket in the Gravity range would have made for a better choice.

Girl is good though.
 

HuusHould

Professional
Not a bad game plan rushing the net. I would've gone with the drop shot then lob play a bit more though! She looked a bit suspect when pulled forward and was "vertically challenged". She was very good for her age though and a good sport, which was good to see. A wayward double fault cost her at a crucial juncture in the 2nd set buster, conversely the big fella served a bomb wide to the ad court when he needed it.
 

Chas Tennis

G.O.A.T.
She often turns her uppermost body back 90 degrees and then forward 90 degrees (roughly) and that is what is seen often in the ATP & WTA ground strokes. He is not so methodical.

Once at our club in the early Eighties, one of the better players, NTRP 4.0-4.5, played young, highly ranked WTA pro Andrea Leand, with her powerful ground strokes. I believe she was a top 10 or 20 player at the time. It was an exhibition "Pro" set to 8 games, with no add games I think. She won 8-0.

In another match, that I did not see, a 4.5 male player played a 12 year old junior girl. I think it was a 6-0 set with the girl winning. I knew this player from a winter block time group at a Hartrue (clay) indoor tennis facility that Pam Shriver once owned. Since this player was the strongest in the block time group, the other players would remind him of his getting bagelled by a 12 year old girl with glee. This doubles group had players from NTRP 3.5 to 4.5 and ages from about 30 to over 60. But the strangest feature of the group was that they made jokes whenever a player got nailed by the ball. 'I nailed so-in-so tonight' was always spoken as if it were a goal and they had scored a special point.......... ?
 
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ChaelAZ

G.O.A.T.
I find the lack of a lucky net cord acknowledgment from both players painful. No hand raised, no sorry. Is that an American approach to lucky net cords?
You have a 9 year old and a brand new 2.5 rated player. Let's not throw the lot of American players under the bus for these novices. They most likely don't know that particular odd court etiquette.
 

derick232

Rookie
I find the lack of a lucky net cord acknowledgment from both players painful. No hand raised, no sorry. Is that an American approach to lucky net cords?
I mean, I question why we still raise a hand with a fake apology after a net cord. No one means it and why should I apologize over something I don't have control over. I get that it's the classy thing to do, but you have to admit that ultimately it's a meaningless gesture held up as a sign of class for no reason. Get rid of it and move on to the next point. I say all this while still giving a fake apology after every lucky net cord.
 

giantschwinn

Semi-Pro
This is why I like UTR. In a typical junior competition, you play the same pool of players over and over ... Especially in high level junior competiton it's always those same kids. Now with UTR, kids get to play with adults outside of their parents or coach. I think is great.
I also agree that drop shots are very effective against kids. They can't cover the court that well and once they are at the net it's easy to lob over them.
 

Return_Ace

Hall of Fame
Me and my friends just say "Sorry, not sorry" for a net cord now.

Need to kick that habit when we're allowed to play with strangers again 8-B
 

Clash Ah ah

Rookie
I mean, I question why we still raise a hand with a fake apology after a net cord. No one means it and why should I apologize over something I don't have control over. I get that it's the classy thing to do, but you have to admit that ultimately it's a meaningless gesture held up as a sign of class for no reason. Get rid of it and move on to the next point. I say all this while still giving a fake apology after every lucky net cord.
I personally apologise and mean it, I also apologise for shank winners. I get no joy from lucky net cords or successful miss hits.
 

ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
There has never been a tennis player in history of tennis that was sorry for a net cord winner.

Stop he lies ... start the:

 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
I mean, I question why we still raise a hand with a fake apology after a net cord. No one means it and why should I apologize over something I don't have control over.
There has never been a tennis player in history of tennis that was sorry for a net cord winner.
It's not 'I am sorry I won the point and I wish you had won it instead' - rather 'I'm sorry, as a fellow player I know it sucks when that happens'.

It's really just an acknowledgement to your opponent that you realise you got lucky.
 
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ByeByePoly

G.O.A.T.
It's not 'I am sorry I won the point and I wish you had won it instead' - rather 'I'm sorry, as a fellow player I know it sucks when that happens'.

It's really just an acknowledgement to your opponent that you realise you got lucky.
Who doesn't know that it sucks? 8-B

I was playing doubles with three good friends ... all competive tournament players and USTA teams for years. I hit a net cord winner ... and my buddy on the other side says ... "hey ... BBP didn't even say he was sorry ... smiling while he said it". I said I wasn't a bit sorry, actually glad we won the point. Asked him if he could remember one time he was ever sorry about one of his net cord winners? Big smile ... "nope". Other two ... "nope". Good laugh ... and then continued our match like we were playing for rent money (like all of our matches).

Snowflakes :p:p:p
 

Slowtwitcher

Hall of Fame
Who doesn't know that it sucks? 8-B

I was playing doubles with three good friends ... all competive tournament players and USTA teams for years. I hit a net cord winner ... and my buddy on the other side says ... "hey ... BBP didn't even say he was sorry ... smiling while he said it". I said I wasn't a bit sorry, actually glad we won the point. Asked him if he could remember one time he was ever sorry about one of his net cord winners? Big smile ... "nope". Other two ... "nope". Good laugh ... and then continued our match like we were playing for rent money (like all of our matches).

Snowflakes :p:p:p

You think you're good kid???
 

user92626

G.O.A.T.
I apologize for winning a point off a netcord but have noticed I'm often the only person doing it.
It's not a serious apology. It shouldn't be.

After a while it's just become another gesture, like fist pump or grunting. Nobody, except poor attitude people, is concerned about its existence or absence.
 
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