Internal Shoulder Rotation: Is Subscapularis Only Tendon Involved?

RogueFLIP

Professional
Only subscapularis is involved in ISR. Is this correct?
:unsure:

For your direct question in your subject heading the answer is NO. There are other internal rotator muscles of the shoulder (pectoralis major, teres major, latissumus dorsi)

Your picture is correct however that the subscapularis is the only muscle of the ROTATOR CUFF muscle group that performs internal rotation of the shoulder.
 

Raul_SJ

Legend
For your direct question in your subject heading the answer is NO. There are other internal rotator muscles of the shoulder (pectoralis major, teres major, latissumus dorsi)

Your picture is correct however that the subscapularis is the only muscle of the ROTATOR CUFF muscle group that performs internal rotation of the shoulder.
I have pain when performing ISR as in the pic. But MRI does not indicate any problem with subscapularis tendon.
Only mentions mild tendonititis of supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendon.
 
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Raul_SJ

Legend
The muscle/tendon that does the rotating/movement and the tendon that gets impinged do not have to be the same
MRI findings do not indicate impingement. No tears. Only "mild tendonitis" of infraspinatus and supraspinatus tendons (2 of the 4 Rotator Cuff tendons).

What are some common uses of the MRI procedure?
MRI is an excellent choice for examining the shoulder joint. MRI gives clear views of rotator cuff tears, injuries to the biceps tendon and damage to the glenoid labrum, the soft fibrous tissue rim that helps stabilize the joint.​
MR imaging of the shoulder is typically performed to diagnose or evaluate:​

  • rotator cuff disorders, including tears and impingement, which are the major cause of shoulder pain in patients older than 40 years
 
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