Interval training or long distance running for tennis stamina?

D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
#52
@atp2015 @TagUrIt


Note that a high-responder is AKA a super-responder while a low-responder might be called a non-responder.
(Note: last 3 links below are different sources of the same study)
  • While the majority of people can expect to see (some) improvements in their aerobic fitness (VO2MAX), about 15% can expect drastically improved results (super-responders) while about 20% of the population may not see any benefit at all (non-responders).
https://geneblueprint.com/blogs/blog/high-intensity-interval-training-hiit-response

NY Times: Is Your Workout Not Working? Maybe You’re a Non-Responder

https://cathe.com/are-you-a-high-responder-or-low-responder-to-aerobic-exercise/

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s40279-014-0197-3
ResearchGate: High Responders and Low Responders
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24807838
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95% of couch potatoes will read this and use that as the reason to continue their current couch cardio :p


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#54
best exercise i’ve ever done to lose weight are call “put downs”...

put down that donut
put down that pizza
put down that beer
put down that cake
put down that ice cream

if you do enough reps through out the day, every day... you will lose weight faster than intervals (or any exercise)


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Finding ways to creatively put down forum trolls, like GD and oserver, can be quite exhausting. Mental cardio burns calories.
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Wise one

Professional
#55
Any thoughts on what's the best long term strategy for strong tennis stamina? interval training , long distance or mix of both? What's the ideal amount and also the least one should target ? (for intense adult rec tennis).
Endurance is not all that important. Play serve and volley. Make the other son-of-a-***** do all the running.

George Patton’s last words to us before we left Africa came home with meaning: “No dumb ******* ever won a war by going out and dying for his country. He won it by making some other dumb ******* die for his country.”
 
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atp2015

Hall of Fame
#59
i hate running, i would rather play tennis 5 hours than run 2 kilometres. ****ing worst thing to do on planet.
I have heard a lot of people say that and I have said it myself. I would rather play 3 hour tennis than run for 30 minutes.
But the reality is that there is not enough time in a day for a rec player to devote 3 hours to tennis multiple times a week.
If you want to get 2 tough sets in 90 minutes, some sort of physical endurance is needed. If we are talking about old men's 3.5 doubles , it's a different story.
 
#60
i hate running, i would rather play tennis 5 hours than run 2 kilometres. ****ing worst thing to do on planet.
Running is way down on my list of things I'd choose if I wanted to improve my fitness. Previously, I hated it so much because I was so bad at it. But after having done a lot of tennis drills, I find I can now run for longer distances with no problem [if you call my pedestrian speed "running"]. So running hasn't improved my tennis but rather vice versa.
 
#61
IF you're a man, long distance running can lead to low testosterone.
How about taking in vitamin D, zinc & fenugreek before/after your long distance run? DHEA or Pregnenolone, cordyceps, tribulus terrestris & ginger may or may not might also help.

I had heard that runners who train for an ultra-marathon or run extremely long distances can experience a decrease in T levels. However, moderate endurance training is ideal for boosting the body's production of testosterone. Also, short, intense interval workouts have been found to significantly increase T levels.
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#62
Interval training without question. Long distance suits no purpose unless you just enjoy running. If you really want to push yourself do a 10-20-30 run where you jog at 50% energy expenditure for 30 seconds, 75% for 20 seconds, then almost a flat out sprint for the last 10 seconds. Walk for a 2 minute cooldown then repeat. After a few sets you’ll hate life but it really helped build my cardio and endurance while also getting my heart rate high enough to burn fat too.
 
#63
Interval training without question. Long distance suits no purpose unless you just enjoy running...
I strongly question this. Refer to post #23 in this thread.
More on this (start at page 32 on first link):

http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/USTA_Import/USTA/dps/doc_437_1373.pdf


https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6479271_Tennis_physiology_training_the_competitive_athlete

https://www.bemidjistate.edu/academ...nis-Specific-Fitness-Program-Johnson-Kara.pdf


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2653871/


"This ... requires successful tennis athletes to be highly trained both anaerobically for performance, and aerobically, to aid in recovery during and after play."
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#64
I strongly question this. Refer to post #23 in this thread.
More on this (start at page 32 on first link):

http://assets.usta.com/assets/1/USTA_Import/USTA/dps/doc_437_1373.pdf


https://www.researchgate.net/publication/6479271_Tennis_physiology_training_the_competitive_athlete

https://www.bemidjistate.edu/academ...nis-Specific-Fitness-Program-Johnson-Kara.pdf


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2653871/


"This ... requires successful tennis athletes to be highly trained both anaerobically for performance, and aerobically, to aid in recovery during and after play."
.

In terms of general fitness and strength there’s no question that interval training is more beneficial than long distance running to an athlete whether they are a tennis player or playing another sport that uses quick twitch muscles. For one, using sprint training will help a tennis player on quick bursts to explode towards the net on drop shots much better than jogging ever could.

Finally, have you ever watched the Olympics? There’s a reason sprinters are chiseled athletes while the marathoners mostly look “skinny fat”. It’s their training regimens that make them appear this way.
 
#65
In terms of general fitness and strength there’s no question that interval training is more beneficial than long distance running to an athlete whether they are a tennis player or playing another sport that uses quick twitch muscles. For one, using sprint training will help a tennis player on quick bursts to explode towards the net on drop shots much better than jogging ever could.

Finally, have you ever watched the Olympics? There’s a reason sprinters are chiseled athletes while the marathoners mostly look “skinny fat”. It’s their training regimens that make them appear this way.
BOTH are needed. Pls read my post and read the links. Chiseling is not the only/primary requisite for tennis endurance.

BTW, I have been talking about aerobic conditioning -- not necessarily long distance running.
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#66
BOTH are needed. Pls read my post and read the links. Chiseling is not the only/primary requisite for tennis endurance.

BTW, I have been talking about aerobic conditioning -- not necessarily long distance running.
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Please refer to here:
https://www.semanticscholar.org/pap...rtin/69d89b7632df646a46654e55480c351930e1d469

And here
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839711/

There are countless scholarly articles that have scientific data which proves interval training is a more time effective, and overall healthier way to build endurance, while limiting the loss of muscle mass while not destroying your joints like long distance training does. That’s the discussion in terms of the OP’s thread.

As far as aerobic conditioning for tennis endurance I am 100% convinced interval training is a far better routine to follow for tennis and overall tennis endurance and general health to build conditioning.
 
#67
@TimeToPlaySets @atp2015
Please refer to here:
https://www.semanticscholar.org/pap...rtin/69d89b7632df646a46654e55480c351930e1d469

And here
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839711/

There are countless scholarly articles that have scientific data which proves interval training is a more time effective, and overall healthier way to build endurance, while limiting the loss of muscle mass while not destroying your joints like long distance training does. That’s the discussion in terms of the OP’s thread.

As far as aerobic conditioning for tennis endurance I am 100% convinced interval training is a far better routine to follow for tennis and overall tennis endurance and general health to build conditioning.
Your links are not targeted specifically to the aerobic/anaerobic needs of competitive tennis players. Mine are tennis-specific. Your studies may or may not be apropos for tennis. Depends on the individual (& their current condition). As I explained previously, some individuals (high- or super-responders) will derive a high degree of aerobic benefit (as well as aneaerobic benefit) from some forms of interval training, such as HIIT (Tabata protocol). Many may require other types of aerobic training (not necessarily long distance running) for their tennis energy/stamina needs.
 
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#68
@TimeToPlaySets


Your links are not targeted specifically to the aerobic/anaerobic needs of competitive tennis players. Mine are. Your studies may or may not be apropos for tennis. Depends on the individual. As I explained previously, some individual (high- or super-responders) will derive a high degree aerobic benefit (as well as aneaerobic benefit) from some forms of interval training, such a HIIT (Tabata protocol). Many may require other types of aerobic training (not necessarily long distance running) for their tennis energy/stamina needs.
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You speak on the needs of “competitive tennis players”. Here’s an excerpt from an article written on Andy Roddick’s workout routine in 2009. I’d say he was a pretty decent competitive tennis player.
The link to the article is here:
https://www.askmen.com/sports/bodybuilding_250/282_training-for-tennis-the-roddick-way.html

Training for endurance

When it comes to training for endurance in tennis, you’re going to do a lot of running, both distance running and sprints — and you’ll “switch them off.” Andy Roddick, however, “will never really run six or seven miles at a time,” as he tends to “focus more on power-speed type running drills.”

In tennis, recovery as an aspect of endurance is as important (if not more so) than the ability to play for an hour or longer. As such, your training should reflect the experience on court, where you’ll only have 25 seconds to recover between sets. To achieve this, Roddick does a lot of “straight track work.” With only a minute and a half to recover between sets, Andy will run “30-, 40-, 60-meter sprints (8 to each one)” and the following day he’ll do five or six 300s (300 meters). “With me, my focus is more on how quickly I’m able to recover from something tough.”
 
#69
You speak on the needs of “competitive tennis players”. Here’s an excerpt from an article written on Andy Roddick’s workout routine in 2009. I’d say he was a pretty decent competitive tennis player.
The link to the article is here:
https://www.askmen.com/sports/bodybuilding_250/282_training-for-tennis-the-roddick-way.html

Training for endurance

When it comes to training for endurance in tennis, you’re going to do a lot of running, both distance running and sprints — and you’ll “switch them off.” Andy Roddick, however, “will never really run six or seven miles at a time,” as he tends to “focus more on power-speed type running drills.”

In tennis, recovery as an aspect of endurance is as important (if not more so) than the ability to play for an hour or longer. As such, your training should reflect the experience on court, where you’ll only have 25 seconds to recover between sets. To achieve this, Roddick does a lot of “straight track work.” With only a minute and a half to recover between sets, Andy will run “30-, 40-, 60-meter sprints (8 to each one)” and the following day he’ll do five or six 300s (300 meters). “With me, my focus is more on how quickly I’m able to recover from something tough.”
Andy Roddick played several sports competitively (basketball, tennis, baseball) prior to becoming an ATP player. In fact, along with Mardy Fish, he played varsity basketball in high school. As a result, he undoubtedly engaged in all sorts of different types of training and has been very fit for much of his life. If ARod already had a high VO2MAX, he probably did not need much further aerobic fitness training. Or, he could very well have been one of those high-responders that I referred to.

As I said, training requirements/needs depends on the individual -- but both types of endurance (aero & non-aero) are required for tennis.
 
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#73
Achilles standard calf toe raises
And the two against the wall stretch one with straight leg and one bent leg. Do them multiple times and on the third one really press the leg into the floor

After a couple of weeks of religiously doing that and you can do eccentric toe raises on the edge of a step. Under no circumstances do the eccentric ones first
 

2good4U

Professional
#74
For us guys, eating mushrooms often will help keep estrogen levels in check.
(see youtube for info on how men are being estrogenicided by our society)
 

2good4U

Professional
#75
I found that fasting seems to really go at the fat stores, really rips the fat out of where you would want it out - belly!
It also rips toxin, dead and defective cells out, and raises HGH and Testosterone.

But good luck getting your typical hedonistic American to skip a meal, the gullet-stuffing automatons!
 
#77
For us guys, eating mushrooms often will help keep estrogen levels in check.
(see youtube for info on how men are being estrogenicided by our society)
It also rips toxin, dead and defective cells out, and raises HGH and Testosterone.

But good luck getting your typical hedonistic American to skip a meal, the gullet-stuffing automatons!
I suspect you have a few bumper stickers on your windowless van.
 
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