Is it just me...

F

FRV

Guest
Probably because it is easily accessible. I would be playing baseball, basketball, and american football right now as well if I were good enough and didn't get fat.
 
Well the "good enough" part comes into play then.
I always thought that BB on that level requires much less skill than tennis, and accommodates wider array of styles as far as participation goes, but I get that some people just prefer tennis (me included).

:cool:
 
F

FRV

Guest
I always thought that BB on that level requires much less skill than tennis, and accommodates wider array of styles as far as participation goes, but I get that some people just prefer tennis (me included).

:cool:
True, but with baseball I was only good at pitching, and I think my arm maxes out at a point where I couldn't still be pitching today had I pursued baseball further. I may have not even made my high school team. Every other position requires you to be good at fielding, which I was miserable at. I wasn't good at hitting either because I became scared of the ball hitting me (I was really bad at getting out of the way). So for me, my ability really keeps me from playing some of the other sports of which I am a fan.
 
True, but with baseball I was only good at pitching, and I think my arm maxes out at a point where I couldn't still be pitching today had I pursued baseball further. I may have not even made my high school team. Every other position requires you to be good at fielding, which I was miserable at. I wasn't good at hitting either because I became scared of the ball hitting me (I was really bad at getting out of the way). So for me, my ability really keeps me from playing some of the other sports of which I am a fan.
Ahhh, talking to me about Baseball or American football is a hopeless endeavour.

:cool:

P.S. I was talking about Basketball.
 
F

FRV

Guest
Ahhh, talking to me about Baseball or American football is a hopeless endeavour.

:cool:

P.S. I was talking about Basketball.
Oh, then you have a point there. It's a little lopsided around here because everyone plays basketball while not too many play tennis, so the talent disparity I witness is huge. That said, perhaps I should have kept basketball off the list, since it's probably pretty easy to get into a pick-up game of basketball.
 

Hmgraphite1

Hall of Fame
Lot of former hockey players around here, but we are near Canada
Playing football at 55 , I would break or be broken
 

Turbo-87

Legend
Tennis is a sport that is easily accessible and you can find anyone to play with without much trouble. I'd say basketball falls in this same bucket. Baseball, football and hockey, not so much. In my experience, it is hard to find teams to play on and you have to try out to even be considered. Hockey in particular can be pretty "cliquey." Plus, those types of teams dry up as you hit the mid 30's where tennis is a lifelong deal. It's just a sport you can pick up at any time like I did at 40.

Tennis and basketball are just sports you can be a fan of and decide on a whim to start playing. I couldn't see too many people watching an NFL game and then decide that flag football is for them. Try finding enough guys for that. :)
 
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sureshs

Bionic Poster
...or is there a much higher percentage of tennis fans who actually play the sport than there is for other sports?

How many American football fans currently play the sport for instance? Or AFL/NRL in Australia?

But every second person on here or more seems to play tennis.
@Sentinel is an exception.

But he was always an exceptional guy.
 

Sentinel

Bionic Poster
Eye am surprise and disappoint that our forum expert on the tenace court and ballet stage has knot weighed inn yet inn this thread. Hee personally haz prooved won can bee phat anne olde wile still pleighing whirled cla.s.s tenace.
Our balleigh expert alone skews the percentidge of peepul who play tenace against those who just poast.
 

er4claw

Rookie
...or is there a much higher percentage of tennis fans who actually play the sport than there is for other sports?

How many American football fans currently play the sport for instance? Or AFL/NRL in Australia?

But every second person on here or more seems to play tennis.
Some of those sports require a lot of people to play. How many people do you need to get close to a genuine football game. Much more than 4. What is it 22 guys on the filed at once in football. Tennis is also much safer than the sports you mentioned. Football players are always injured and if you are an adult wage earner, not everyone is covered for that. You can play low intensity tennis if you are out of shape, if you get tackled and your old and fat you can seriously injure yourself. You can play variations like touch football, but its going to be hard with even 4 guys. What one qb, a receiver a defender... its not really football.

I hate basketball but I think most b ball fans play. Softball is popular, much safer than football.
 

er4claw

Rookie
.......or perhaps this being a tennis website.......
I don't people on the NFL forums play football regularly like people here play tennis. Most of them probably haven't played since high school or a touch football game at a big party.
 

er4claw

Rookie
(y) This is probably the reason (y)(y)(y) Tennis is the only spot activity I know of where different genders, skill levels, age groups and almost all cultures can all share the same court at a recreational level :giggle:
Its really hard to rally in tennis though. I've been causally playing tennis for 10 years and I still don't feel comfortable saying I can go out and have 7+ shot practice rallies with someone. I could probably do it if I pushed with half strokes and easy slices, but it took me a long time even to get to this level. Badminton on the other, I picked up the racquet and could have fun 20+ stroke rallies on the first day with another beginner. Not that this is relevant for competition but for causal play, tennis isn't an easy sport in my opinion.
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
Its really hard to rally in tennis though. I've been causally playing tennis for 10 years and I still don't feel comfortable saying I can go out and have 7+ shot practice rallies with someone. I could probably do it if I pushed with half strokes and easy slices, but it took me a long time even to get to this level. Badminton on the other, I picked up the racquet and could have fun 20+ stroke rallies on the first day with another beginner. Not that this is relevant for competition but for causal play, tennis isn't an easy sport in my opinion.
No doubt (y) Steep learning curve in tennis compared to recreational badminton o_Oo_Oo_O When I mentioned culture in my original post I think it would apply to badminton, America doesn’t really know or care about it :eek::eek: as far as I understand it’s seen mainly as a girl’s sport in the America’s, or something maybe done on a family picnic or barbecue :unsure::unsure::unsure:

I play badminton as a kid and past a certain level it is every bit as challenging as tennis, not sure why they look down on it in USA :cautious::cautious::cautious:
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
Cycling, pétanque, board games, dancing, golf are all such sports.

:cool:
True they are activities that can be shared across genders, ages, skill levels but for one reason or another these too just are not as wide spread as tennis over the planet. Maybe golf, but socio-economically I think perhaps it stays exclusive only for certain classes :unsure::unsure::unsure:
 

er4claw

Rookie
No doubt (y) Steep learning curve in tennis compared to recreational badminton o_Oo_Oo_O When I mentioned culture in my original post I think it would apply to badminton, America doesn’t really know or care about it :eek::eek: as far as I understand it’s seen mainly as a girl’s sport in the America’s, or something maybe done on a family picnic or barbecue :unsure::unsure::unsure:

I play badminton as a kid and past a certain level it is every bit as challenging as tennis, not sure why they look down on it in USA :cautious::cautious::cautious:
The only place I ever experienced badminton was gym class in high school, never played it since. Its definitely considered a girls sport where I'm from and I'm not a girl...
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
The only place I ever experienced badminton was gym class in high school, never played it since. Its definitely considered a girls sport where I'm from and I'm not a girl...
Yeah, I remember suggesting badminton to my family living in Houston, there was a park right across the street and my nephews there refused to even try it, like it would give them some disease or something :laughing::-D:laughing::-D Though they were horrible at tennis they preferred that :p:p

Maybe young boys just want to whack things and see a result :unsure::unsure::unsure:
 
True they are activities that can be shared across genders, ages, skill levels but for one reason or another these too just are not as wide spread as tennis over the planet. Maybe golf, but socio-economically I think perhaps it stays exclusive only for certain classes :unsure::unsure::unsure:
You can add to those skiing, mountaineering, swimming etc.

The list is pretty long, and tennis is one of the most inaccessible sports compared to most of those, as it requires specially constructed facilities, and pretty expensive equipment too.

:cool:
 
C

Chadalina

Guest
You can add to those skiing, mountaineering, swimming etc.

The list is pretty long, and tennis is one of the most inaccessible sports compared to most of those, as it requires specially constructed facilities, and pretty expensive equipment too.

:cool:
That makes no sense. A pool costs more than a court, building a mountain to ski on isnt cheap...
 
That makes no sense. A pool costs more than a court, building a mountain to ski on isnt cheap...
Next thing you will tell me is that digging a river or an ocean is even more expensive.

Lucky that apparently some people can afford that, seeing how many people can afford to swim in those.

:)
 
C

Chadalina

Guest
Next thing you will tell me is that digging a river or an ocean is even more expensive.

Lucky that apparently some people can afford that, seeing how many people can afford to swim in those.

:)
Ahh, i forgot everyone lives on the beach and has a river in the backyard
 
Ahh, i forgot everyone lives on the beach and has a river in the backyard
They surely live at least by the roadside. Or the trail. In which case there is walking, running, cycling right in front of them.

Even in the wildest outback.

There are no "natural" tennis courts, so the argument you are trying to make is pretty much cooked.

:cool:
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
I don’t find tennis a friendly sport to learn and master.
It has a high dropout rate in my opinion, because people get frustrated thinking it’s easier than it looks.
It normally requires to take classes to start playing it decently.
 
Googled pétanque, and it’s somewhat similar to “bochas”, which is played in Argentina mostly by elder people.
Petanque can be played basically everywhere where there is a levelled place covered with earth/sandy soil, and even grass (but is unusual). You don't need a special court for it. It is also played by all sorts of people, but yes, mostly older generations. It is still a good way to do some exercise while doing picnic or similar.

:cool:
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
That makes no sense. A pool costs more than a court, building a mountain to ski on isnt cheap...
Agree, what a strange comment :oops::oops: How can you even compare tennis to skiing :oops::oops::oops: What about people in Miami? Or New York? Or Nairobi ???????? Or Caribbean? South America? China? India?

You can add to those skiing, mountaineering, swimming etc.

The list is pretty long, and tennis is one of the most inaccessible sports compared to most of those, as it requires specially constructed facilities, and pretty expensive equipment too.

:cool:
You got it wrong :giggle: Tennis is one of the least expensive sports, go to any public court and see the equipment needed :laughing::laughing: Sure many people want those fancy country clubs or wear branded ND, RN, RF clothing, but doesn’t need to be like that at all :laughing:

The first thing I tell rec students is forget all that stuff you see at pro level. Rec tennis 3.5~4.0 level, which is the biggest category of players, can be played with a sub $100 racquet and very affordable synthetic gut. That racquet will last for years (y) You don’t even need much coaching to get there, just put in repetition.

Cycling, skis and mountain equipment cheaper than tennis :laughing::-D:laughing::-D:laughing::-D
 
C

Chadalina

Guest
They surely live at least by the roadside. Or the trail. In which case there is walking, running, cycling right in front of them.

Even in the wildest outback.

There are no "natural" tennis courts, so the argument you are trying to make is pretty much cooked.

:cool:
wow, lmao
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
I don’t find tennis a friendly sport to learn and master.
It has a high dropout rate in my opinion, because people get frustrated thinking it’s easier than it looks.
It normally requires to take classes to start playing it decently.
What I find is rec players imagine copying the pros which is hugely complicated. All that stuff about pat the dog, wrist flips and extreme pronating not for the casual tennis player. If you just want to put in 2-3 hours per week to learn tennis then better to learn simple style consistent rallying. And that’s what people can play well into their 70’s (y)(y)
 
C

Chadalina

Guest
I don’t find tennis a friendly sport to learn and master.
It has a high dropout rate in my opinion, because people get frustrated thinking it’s easier than it looks.
It normally requires to take classes to start playing it decently.
People get burnt out because 2 ball ralleys arent fun. Picking up as many balls as they hit. Once you can hit almost all your shots in, the real game of tennis begins.
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
People get burnt out because 2 ball ralleys arent fun. Picking up as many balls as they hit. Once you can hit almost all your shots in, the real game of tennis begins.
(y)(y)(y)

I bought a ball machine very recently from Sibaosi [after reading a review here in TW] this gives 2-3 line feeding :giggle: If the ambition of the student is no more than 4.0 level, they just need to learn how to read the ball - it virtually costs nothing to both the student and coach to give them enough repetition to develop that.

If want to go higher than 4.0, sure, need more detailed coaching and that will cost. But I am sure this will be any major sport, in fact I feel us tennis coaches make little compared to the ones in football and basketball :(:(:(

I find the issue is most people think tennis is easy so they think in few hours or weeks will hit like Federer :laughing: And actually also, many parents expecting that also, the ones that don’t know anything about tennis and haven’t played it :rolleyes::rolleyes:
 
Agree, what a strange comment :oops::oops: How can you even compare tennis to skiing :oops::oops::oops: What about people in Miami? Or New York? Or Nairobi ???????? Or Caribbean? South America? China? India?
If you looked past the particular sport, you will see that the argument addresses this statement:

Tennis is the only spot activity I know of where different genders, skill levels, age groups and almost all cultures can all share the same court at a recreational level
Now I don't know where you live, but I can tell you that tennis is probably one of the most difficult sports to gather people from different genders, skill levels, and age groups (can't tell about cultural matches, but I can imagine that that is not particularly correct too).

Almost all (if not all) sports I mentioned are better suited for that.



You got it wrong :giggle: Tennis is one of the least expensive sports, go to any public court and see the equipment needed :laughing::laughing: Sure many people want those fancy country clubs or wear branded ND, RN, RF clothing, but doesn’t need to be like that at all :laughing:

The first thing I tell rec students is forget all that stuff you see at pro level. Rec tennis 3.5~4.0 level, which is the biggest category of players, can be played with a sub $100 racquet and very affordable synthetic gut. That racquet will last for years (y) You don’t even need much coaching to get there, just put in repetition.

Cycling, skis and mountain equipment cheaper than tennis :laughing::-D:laughing::-D:laughing::-D
You need the court, first, so you need to have a public court, which in itself puts it in disadvantage compared to a number of other sports that I mentioned. The priority of building public courts is not very high in most places on Earth, so that is one problem.

Next problem would be the cost of equipment, and that is pretty much in the top 10 percentile of expensive sports out of the ones I mentioned: To go running you need good shoes, just like in tennis. That is it. To go swimming you need something on your *** and at most a rubber cap and swimming glasses. Most of the others are also pretty cheap compared to tennis.

If we get into the whole coaching thing the costs for tennis skyrocket.

I can make a pretty good analysis on the cost of all the sports you mentioned while laughing. I am not sure whether you will be laughing when I finish with it. BTW, you make the mistake to associate skiing only with ski resorts with downhill slopes, when the vast majority of skiing is done as either touring, ski running or free ride, for which you don't need resorts.

:cool:
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
If you looked past the particular sport, you will see that the argument addresses this statement:



Now I don't know where you live, but I can tell you that tennis is probably one of the most difficult sports to gather people from different genders, skill levels, and age groups (can't tell about cultural matches, but I can imagine that that is not particularly correct too).

Almost all (if not all) sports I mentioned are better suited for that.





You need the court, first, so you need to have a public court, which in itself puts it in disadvantage compared to a number of other sports that I mentioned. The priority of building public courts is not very high in most places on Earth, so that is one problem.

Next problem would be the cost of equipment, and that is pretty much in the top 10 percentile of expensive sports out of the ones I mentioned: To go running you need good shoes, just like in tennis. That is it. To go swimming you need something on your *** and at most a rubber cap and swimming glasses. Most of the others are also pretty cheap compared to tennis.

If we get into the whole coaching thing the costs for tennis skyrocket.

I can make a pretty good analysis on the cost of all the sports you mentioned while laughing. I am not sure whether you will be laughing when I finish with it. BTW, you make the mistake to associate skiing only with ski resorts with downhill slopes, when the vast majority of skiing is done as either touring, ski running or free ride, for which you don't need resorts.

:cool:
Nothing to say here. If it’s cheaper and easier for you and your friends to ski and climb mountains go for it (y)(y)(y)
 
Nothing to say here. If it’s cheaper and easier for you and your friends to ski and climb mountains go for it (y)(y)(y)
I don't ski anymore, because my knees are not in safe enough state for it ...... from tennis.

As for the rest, I do almost all of the above, so, I think I know what I am talking about. I don't mind that you have your opinion, but I haven't seen anything with which you defended your statement that you made in post #28 to which I responded. I saw the smileys, but not many arguments.

BTW, you said that you teach. How much do you charge per hour, and how many hours on average does a student need to take to take it say to a very decent level, where something resembling a normal game (not only getting the ball over the net 4 times) can be played?

:cool:
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
I don't ski anymore, because my knees are not in safe enough state for it ...... from tennis.

As for the rest, I do almost all of the above, so, I think I know what I am talking about. I don't mind that you have your opinion, but I haven't seen anything with which you defended your statement that you made in post #28 to which I responded. I saw the smileys, but not many arguments.

BTW, you said that you teach. How much do you charge per hour, and how many hours on average does a student need to take to take it say to a very decent level, where something resembling a normal game (not only getting the ball over the net 4 times) can be played?

:cool:
To be honest I’ve seen these boards since I been here and don’t really like to get into arguments on the internet, so maybe that why I don’t follow conversations too far :giggle: Also, yes, it’s true, maybe everyone just has a different local dynamic and what’s true in yours is different to mine, I can’t disagree with that notion (y)

Let’s see :unsure: I got tired and frustrated of hearing tennis coaching is expensive and it’s an difficult sport.

It’s expensive if want to play it well, the same as football and basketball and others. But most kids if spending only 2-3 hours per week fall into the category of 3.5~4.0 level and I consider it my privilege and joy to be part of that journey.

To get to a stage they can rally consistently 5+ times the player needs to first learn control, and that means spin. No ball bashing :censored: So mini tennis (y) For kids that’s possible in as little as 2 weeks with red beginner ball. For adults mini tennis more challenging, generally are tighter and want to whack it, maybe 3/4 court tennis - again about 2 weeks to get to consistent controlled rallies with orange novice ball (y)

Now to the cost. On my own I can maybe handle at most about 4 people at once. But really it’s not that effective. And I need to make a living so my charge is about $20-50/hour depending on group size.

With the ball machine however, 3 line feeding, I’m able to handle 10-12 and give everyone enough repetition without everyone collecting balls.

So I now charge $5-10/hour, make more return, they pay less, and getting to 5+ rallies in the same 2 weeks.

I first ask all students what are their expectations and what kind of commitment they want to make to tennis.

If only want 1-2 hours per week above is easy. No need to buy some fancy racquet or strings from Wilson or Babolat ;) Go to Decathlon and get a €50 racquet and just wear sensible court shoes.

With this basic foundation can enjoy tennis for a lifetime.

Most important is to enjoy tennis :giggle:
 
To be honest I’ve seen these boards since I been here and don’t really like to get into arguments on the internet, so maybe that why I don’t follow conversations too far :giggle: Also, yes, it’s true, maybe everyone just has a different local dynamic and what’s true in yours is different to mine, I can’t disagree with that notion (y)

Let’s see :unsure: I got tired and frustrated of hearing tennis coaching is expensive and it’s an difficult sport.

It’s expensive if want to play it well, the same as football and basketball and others. But most kids if spending only 2-3 hours per week fall into the category of 3.5~4.0 level and I consider it my privilege and joy to be part of that journey.

To get to a stage they can rally consistently 5+ times the player needs to first learn control, and that means spin. No ball bashing :censored: So mini tennis (y) For kids that’s possible in as little as 2 weeks with red beginner ball. For adults mini tennis more challenging, generally are tighter and want to whack it, maybe 3/4 court tennis - again about 2 weeks to get to consistent controlled rallies with orange novice ball (y)

Now to the cost. On my own I can maybe handle at most about 4 people at once. But really it’s not that effective. And I need to make a living so my charge is about $20-50/hour depending on group size.

With the ball machine however, 3 line feeding, I’m able to handle 10-12 and give everyone enough repetition without everyone collecting balls.

So I now charge $5-10/hour, make more return, they pay less, and getting to 5+ rallies in the same 2 weeks.

I first ask all students what are their expectations and what kind of commitment they want to make to tennis.

If only want 1-2 hours per week above is easy. No need to buy some fancy racquet or strings from Wilson or Babolat ;) Go to Decathlon and get a €50 racquet and just wear sensible court shoes.

With this basic foundation can enjoy tennis for a lifetime.

Most important is to enjoy tennis :giggle:
$20-50 is a huge difference, and I can't form an opinion on what the costs might be (if I was presented with a financial plan like that from a coach that will teach my granddaughter ..... he will not get the job).

How many hours do you have to work with an average student (not too gifted, but also not too bad) to get him to a 4.0 level. Say it is a woman that is 25. Average intensity per week (so less than 5 times, but more than 1-2 hours per week). In a group of 4 students.

:cool:
 

Pandora Mikado

Semi-Pro
$20-50 is a huge difference, and I can't form an opinion on what the costs might be (if I was presented with a financial plan like that from a coach that will teach my granddaughter ..... he will not get the job).

How many hours do you have to work with an average student (not too gifted, but also not too bad) to get him to a 4.0 level. Say it is a woman that is 25. Average intensity per week (so less than 5 times, but more than 1-2 hours per week). In a group of 4 students.

:cool:
English my fourth language, please be patient ;) $50 for private, $20 for group each person, this without the ball machine :giggle:

Your second question more difficult, each person is different and has different athletic background :cautious: I can only say after seeing the person the time it takes, some especially need more attention but almost everyone in my experience can get to 3.5-4.0 match level in 6-12 months, with moderate commitment (y)
 

Sudacafan

Talk Tennis Guru
In South America tennis is a middle to high class sport.
You would only see lower classes practising it when some young people working in the clubs surge after being spotted as very talented. That only to begin to talk.
Compared to football, it's a no brainer.
Playing competitive tennis requires intensive private financial support mostly from family. Equipment, strings, money for travel and food if competition is intended.
As there is almost no support from governmental institutions, it's very unlikely to see many South Americans high in the rankings now.
 
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