Is it legal for your opponent to wave his racket/arms while you're hitting?

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
In my league match one of my doubles opponents would start waving his arms when you would go to hit a ball. . It was kind of like was Keifer did against Grosjean when he thought the point was over.

The first time he did this he was at the net and I was hitting a low forehand on the same side of the court and I thought he had put his racket up to call a let. Then I realized he just did it to try and distract you and he did this throughout the match. It was especially annoying when I'd go to hit a volley and there is he is waving his arms around.

During the match I didn't say anything, but in case something like that happens again what are the rules about whether the other player's actions are a hindrance?
 

WhiteOut

Semi-Pro
absolutely not legal. and stupid to boot. ive done it once, as a joke on a softball that was easy put away for the opponent, and we were all friends so it got a good laugh. would never do this against an unknown opponent. just begs to get drilled in the hoo ha...
 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
absolutely not legal. and stupid to boot. ive done it once, as a joke on a softball that was easy put away for the opponent, and we were all friends so it got a good laugh. would never do this against an unknown opponent. just begs to get drilled in the hoo ha...
Obviously it was extremely annoying, but is there a rule I can point to that this violates? If something like this happens do you stop the point and tell him that his arm waving is a hindrance and to stop? Is there any penalty if he keeps doing it?

Another one of my doubles matches one of the opponents kept squeaking his shoes just before you'd hit. My partner went up to him during the change over and told him he knows he's doing that to distract us and to knock it off. I'd rather have something specific to say to know how to handle it if it happens on an important point.

99% of the guys I've played on the leagues are very fair and good guys. These were the only 2 that have been problems.
 

WhiteOut

Semi-Pro
from USTA https://www.usta.com/content/dam/usta/pdfs/2015_Code.pdf

Under Hindrance rules:
33. Claiming a hindrance. A player who claims a hindrance must stop play as soon as possible.

And

35. Body movement. A player may feint with the body while a ball is in play. A player may change
position at any time, including while the server is tossing a ball. Any other movement or any
sound that is made solely to distract an opponent, including, but not limited to, waving arms or
racket or stamping feet, is not allowed.
 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
from USTA https://www.usta.com/content/dam/usta/pdfs/2015_Code.pdf

Under Hindrance rules:
33. Claiming a hindrance. A player who claims a hindrance must stop play as soon as possible.

And

35. Body movement. A player may feint with the body while a ball is in play. A player may change
position at any time, including while the server is tossing a ball. Any other movement or any
sound that is made solely to distract an opponent, including, but not limited to, waving arms or
racket or stamping feet, is not allowed.
Thanks! Hopefully this kind of thing won't happen again, but if it does I know what the rule is and to stop play.
 
Thanks! Hopefully this kind of thing won't happen again, but if it does I know what the rule is and to stop play.
Seems like it would work against him since waving one's arms means he's probably a bit off-balance and not in a good ready position. There's a reason why you see very little of that at higher levels: because it's a negative. You could call the hindrance rule.

You could also use it as an opportunity to toughen up mentally: if you can overcome that, you can overcome a lot of distractions, many of which won't be deliberate opponent gamesmanship tactics: leaf blowers, car alarms, screaming kids, screaming adults, barking dogs, adjacent BBQs, bagpipe ceremonies, escaped wildebeests, etc.
 
Obviously it was extremely annoying, but is there a rule I can point to that this violates? If something like this happens do you stop the point and tell him that his arm waving is a hindrance and to stop? Is there any penalty if he keeps doing it?

Another one of my doubles matches one of the opponents kept squeaking his shoes just before you'd hit. My partner went up to him during the change over and told him he knows he's doing that to distract us and to knock it off. I'd rather have something specific to say to know how to handle it if it happens on an important point.

99% of the guys I've played on the leagues are very fair and good guys. These were the only 2 that have been problems.
Squeaking shoes would be a tougher sell as a hindrance. There's no tennis reason to wave one's arms as an opponent is hitting, other than distraction. Squeaking shoes, on the other hand, could just be a result of split stepping, which you should do just as your opponent is hitting. Maybe he is doing it to be distracting, or maybe he just has proper footwork and squeaky shoes.
 

OnTheLine

Hall of Fame
Seems like it would work against him since waving one's arms means he's probably a bit off-balance and not in a good ready position. There's a reason why you see very little of that at higher levels: because it's a negative. You could call the hindrance rule.

You could also use it as an opportunity to toughen up mentally: if you can overcome that, you can overcome a lot of distractions, many of which won't be deliberate opponent gamesmanship tactics: leaf blowers, car alarms, screaming kids, screaming adults, barking dogs, adjacent BBQs, bagpipe ceremonies, escaped wildebeests, etc.
Escaped wildebeests (how does that word not have an "a" in beast?) playing bagpipes: when that happens I cannot serve to save my life!


Squeaking shoes .... my footwork and my shoes create a lot of squeaks .... never considered that perhaps an opponent might find it bothersome ...
 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
Seems like it would work against him since waving one's arms means he's probably a bit off-balance and not in a good ready position. There's a reason why you see very little of that at higher levels: because it's a negative. You could call the hindrance rule.

You could also use it as an opportunity to toughen up mentally: if you can overcome that, you can overcome a lot of distractions, many of which won't be deliberate opponent gamesmanship tactics: leaf blowers, car alarms, screaming kids, screaming adults, barking dogs, adjacent BBQs, bagpipe ceremonies, escaped wildebeests, etc.
Maybe he knew I wasn't going at him since he did it when he was close to the net and I was trying to hit over or around him to the baseline player. You're right that it would be hard to recover and hit a volley from there. Although if it happens again I'm going to call a hindrance.
 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
Squeaking shoes would be a tougher sell as a hindrance. There's no tennis reason to wave one's arms as an opponent is hitting, other than distraction. Squeaking shoes, on the other hand, could just be a result of split stepping, which you should do just as your opponent is hitting. Maybe he is doing it to be distracting, or maybe he just has proper footwork and squeaky shoes.
Maybe that's why my partner didn't call a hindrance and just talked to the guy. If I recall correctly he never squeaked his shoes when his partner was hitting. It was only when my partner or I would go to hit. Especially with something like an overhead or high volley.
 

zaskar1

Rookie
In my league match one of my doubles opponents would start waving his arms when you would go to hit a ball. . It was kind of like was Keifer did against Grosjean when he thought the point was over.

The first time he did this he was at the net and I was hitting a low forehand on the same side of the court and I thought he had put his racket up to call a let. Then I realized he just did it to try and distract you and he did this throughout the match. It was especially annoying when I'd go to hit a volley and there is he is waving his arms around.

During the match I didn't say anything, but in case something like that happens again what are the rules about whether the other player's actions are a hindrance?
eb
its a deliberate hindrance, claim the point
check the rules of tennis regarding a deliberate hindran

z
 

esgee48

Legend
If the guy is waving his racquet right in front of me as I set up, I would hit him in the chest with the ball. I did this 3 times to a guy that would not back off the net. Hit him 3 times. My partner knocked his racquet out of his hands. Said "Sorry" after each tag.

We knew what he was doing and since he did not back off, we hit him. You could claim the points based on hindrance, but it was more satisfying to tag him. If the player was a novice (very unlikely at our level), we would stop the point and explain what they were doing was a hindrance.
 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
If the guy is waving his racquet right in front of me as I set up, I would hit him in the chest with the ball. I did this 3 times to a guy that would not back off the net. Hit him 3 times. My partner knocked his racquet out of his hands. Said "Sorry" after each tag.

We knew what he was doing and since he did not back off, we hit him. You could claim the points based on hindrance, but it was more satisfying to tag him. If the player was a novice (very unlikely at our level), we would stop the point and explain what they were doing was a hindrance.
It just kind of goes against my nature to hit someone with the ball, but if there was anyone I was going to do it to it was this guy. I got pretty annoyed with it but always try to be civil in these matches. So calling a hindrance and claiming the point is more my style, but tagging him over and over is sure tempting.
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
I often move at the net right before my opponent is about to hit. Perfectly legal. My shoes squeak because I take step towards the strap and move back. Perfectly legal. I don't wave my arms only or wave my racquet only. Whatever arm or racquet movement is purely from my body moving positions.

But the sole purpose of the fake is to create a thought in the hitter's brain. So it's like legal distraction imho.
 
I often move at the net right before my opponent is about to hit. Perfectly legal. My shoes squeak because I take step towards the strap and move back. Perfectly legal. I don't wave my arms only or wave my racquet only. Whatever arm or racquet movement is purely from my body moving positions.

But the sole purpose of the fake is to create a thought in the hitter's brain. So it's like legal distraction imho.
Exactly. For example, look at Bob Bryan at net at 4:22:

 

chatt_town

Hall of Fame
In my league match one of my doubles opponents would start waving his arms when you would go to hit a ball. . It was kind of like was Keifer did against Grosjean when he thought the point was over.

The first time he did this he was at the net and I was hitting a low forehand on the same side of the court and I thought he had put his racket up to call a let. Then I realized he just did it to try and distract you and he did this throughout the match. It was especially annoying when I'd go to hit a volley and there is he is waving his arms around.

During the match I didn't say anything, but in case something like that happens again what are the rules about whether the other player's actions are a hindrance?

I've hit a woman and a guy for doing silly $h*t like that. The woman got hit in the chest if I remember with an overhead. I asked her not to scrub her feet in the court when she was not making a point to get to a different position on the court...not even running in place...just scrubbing her foot on the ground....of course after I hit her she was appauled but I simply told her I heard her feet and thought she had left the spot and my eyes were on the ball coming out of the air....the guy same thing...scrubbing feet in the court. He got nailed in the shoulder. So I ask them not to do it at first. Most will stop. Both of them stopped after being nailed. More than likely there is no one to enforce anything so nailing them is best option after asking them to stop and they don't. :)
 

chatt_town

Hall of Fame
Seems like it would work against him since waving one's arms means he's probably a bit off-balance and not in a good ready position. There's a reason why you see very little of that at higher levels: because it's a negative. You could call the hindrance rule.

You could also use it as an opportunity to toughen up mentally: if you can overcome that, you can overcome a lot of distractions, many of which won't be deliberate opponent gamesmanship tactics: leaf blowers, car alarms, screaming kids, screaming adults, barking dogs, adjacent BBQs, bagpipe ceremonies, escaped wildebeests, etc.
Bagpipe ceremonies? Man you are cracking me up...lol
 

Traffic

Hall of Fame
I've hit a woman and a guy for doing silly $h*t like that. The woman got hit in the chest if I remember with an overhead. I asked her not to scrub her feet in the court when she was not making a point to get to a different position on the court...not even running in place...just scrubbing her foot on the ground....of course after I hit her she was appauled but I simply told her I heard her feet and thought she had left the spot and my eyes were on the ball coming out of the air....the guy same thing...scrubbing feet in the court. He got nailed in the shoulder. So I ask them not to do it at first. Most will stop. Both of them stopped after being nailed. More than likely there is no one to enforce anything so nailing them is best option after asking them to stop and they don't. :)
Scrubbing feet? Like split-stepping? :unsure:
 

chatt_town

Hall of Fame
It just kind of goes against my nature to hit someone with the ball, but if there was anyone I was going to do it to it was this guy. I got pretty annoyed with it but always try to be civil in these matches. So calling a hindrance and claiming the point is more my style, but tagging him over and over is sure tempting.
You run into enough @$$holes you will start nailing them and not losing a drop sleep over it. My wife and I have actually lost matches for trying to to avoid nailing people that didn't know how to get off the net or back up with overheads....and I'm cool with that, but someone being an @$$...will probably get it first chance that comes up. Good luck on getting a hindrance call and claiming a point in a match with no referee.
Scrubbing feet? Like split-stepping? :unsure:
No,...litterally taking one of their feet and just putting in front and dragging it back...just to cause a distraction...split stepping doesn't bother me.
 

jm1980

G.O.A.T.
Escaped wildebeests (how does that word not have an "a" in beast?) playing bagpipes: when that happens I cannot serve to save my life!
The word comes from South African Dutch (the animal is native to Southern Africa) and in Dutch it's spelled that way. It just means "wild beast"

 

EddieBrock

Semi-Pro
You run into enough @$$holes you will start nailing them and not losing a drop sleep over it. My wife and I have actually lost matches for trying to to avoid nailing people that didn't know how to get off the net or back up with overheads....and I'm cool with that, but someone being an @$$...will probably get it first chance that comes up. Good luck on getting a hindrance call and claiming a point in a match with no referee.

No,...litterally taking one of their feet and just putting in front and dragging it back...just to cause a distraction...split stepping doesn't bother me.
So you can't just stop play and call a hindrance? If it happens again I'd tell my partner about it to make sure he backs me up. If both of us agree with the hindrance call then what? Do you think "Wavy Arms" and his partner will say it's not? If the guy's doing something like that he's got to know exactly what he's doing.
 

FedLIKEnot

Professional
As others have said it’s a hinderence. But like with gamesmanship as the opponent you have to weigh pros and cons of blowing up the spot. I’ve had people make noise and not a grunt but like legit distracting noises on my overheads or volleys and I thought about saying something even off hand. Than you realize it isn’t even really worth the fight and that is why people do it.
 

stapletonj

Professional
If it's obvious what they are doing, stop play and claim the point. If you are halfway through your swing when you are distracted, you better call out somehitng before you hit and the ball doesnt go back in play or they will accuse you fo trying to get a "two chances" and try to deny the hindrance.
 
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