Is it the right choice from Nadal?

Is Nadal doing the correct schedule?

  • Yes

    Votes: 14 73.7%
  • No

    Votes: 5 26.3%

  • Total voters
    19
#1
Since 2016 he has not played at Rio, but instead at Acapulco in February.

Now I am not sure why, because believe it or not, Nadal is better on Clay.

But what do this forum think, is it the right choice, does he do it to give the next gen a chance on Clay, or is it simply that he doesn't want to play Hard, Clay, Hard, Clay (thinking of sunshine doubles).
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
#3
Since 2016 he has not played at Rio, but instead at Acapulco in February.

Now I am not sure why, because believe it or not, Nadal is better on Clay.

But what do this forum think, is it the right choice, does he do it to give the next gen a chance on Clay, or is it simply that he doesn't want to play Hard, Clay, Hard, Clay (thinking of sunshine doubles).
Probably trying to hone his hardcourt skills in prepration for the big hardcourt events coming up. His clay skills will always speak for themselves.
 
#6
Rafa suffers when playing in high humidity - he loves heat but the humidity makes him ill, probably because he sweats so much. The conditions in February in Rio are too harsh for him. He has said that he loves Rio and would be happy to play there at a different time of year.
 
#7
Rafa suffers when playing in high humidity - he loves heat but the humidity makes him ill, probably because he sweats so much. The conditions in February in Rio are too harsh for him. He has said that he loves Rio and would be happy to play there at a different time of year.
Acapulco is not much better, with an average high of 30.4 C (87 F) and 73% average humidity in February

Anyway, you just don't know with Nadal and tournaments not played on clay. He was scheduled to play in Acapulco last year but withdrew in the last minute
 

Tennis_Hands

Talk Tennis Guru
#8
Rafa suffers when playing in high humidity - he loves heat but the humidity makes him ill, probably because he sweats so much. The conditions in February in Rio are too harsh for him. He has said that he loves Rio and would be happy to play there at a different time of year.
I love these explanations that have no connection to reality, but pretend to illustrate intimate knowledge about Nadal.

The probable reasons are:

1) money - his appearance fee is higher
2) less travel
3) he has businesses nearby, so it is easier to just be there and make a seamless transition
4) possibly the security situation in Rio is more problematic

:cool:
 
#9
Acapulco is not much better, with an average high of 30.4 C (87 F) and 73% average humidity in February

Anyway, you just don't know with Nadal and tournaments not played on clay. He was scheduled to play in Acapulco last year but withdrew in the last minute
It might not be a lot better but Rafa has played in both places and obviously prefers Acapulco. I've seen all the matches he's played in Rio and the humidity really affects him there - he's drenched before the match even starts and the humidity doesn't go down. He's played til 3:30 in the morning there and the humidity was still in the high 90s. Anyway, he's said in numerous interviews that he loves playing in S America but it's too hard on his body to play in those conditions.

He withdrew from Acapulco last year because of his hip problem. He also had to pull out of his favourite tournament of the year at Indian Wells and you know (or should know) that the hip injury had to be serious for him to miss it.
 
#10
I love these explanations that have no connection to reality, but pretend to illustrate intimate knowledge about Nadal.

The probable reasons are:

1) money - his appearance fee is higher
2) less travel
3) he has businesses nearby, so it is easier to just be there and make a seamless transition
4) possibly the security situation in Rio is more problematic

:cool:
So your wild guesses are more probable than what Rafa has said himself numerous times and from what his fans have seen with their own eyes. Okey dokey. :rolleyes:
 

ADuck

Hall of Fame
#13
I love these explanations that have no connection to reality, but pretend to illustrate intimate knowledge about Nadal.
Yes.

Learn from that.

:cool:
You'd sound more believable if you were as critical of opinions of the opposite fanbase. There is, in fact, a connection to reality when people say Nadal suffers more in the humidity. It is known that the body's means for expelling heat by sweating is far less effective in humidity because the sweat cannot evaporate as fast. If you were well-informed you would also know that Nadal has mentioned before that he struggles especially in humid conditions. I also specifically remember Nadal citing the humidity as explanation for his loss in Miami in 2016. Before you or others want to harp on Nadal for yet another "humbalito peak injured rusty bull, 100% moral W/L record," I'd remind you that Federer offered the same explanation for his loss to Millman at last year's US Open. Whether or not this has to do with his preference to play Acapulco over Rio is still not enough to elicit such a dumbfounded response.
 
#14
You'd sound more believable if you were as critical of opinions of the opposite fanbase. There is, in fact, a connection to reality when people say Nadal suffers more in the humidity. It is known that the body's means for expelling heat by sweating is far less effective in humidity because the sweat cannot evaporate as fast. If you were well-informed you would also know that Nadal has mentioned before that he struggles especially in humid conditions. I also specifically remember Nadal citing the humidity as explanation for his loss in Miami in 2016. Before you or others want to harp on Nadal for yet another "humbalito peak injured rusty bull, 100% moral W/L record," I'd remind you that Federer offered the same explanation for his loss to Millman at last year's US Open. Whether or not this has to do with his preference to play Acapulco over Rio is still not enough to elicit such a dumbfounded response.
Some people are not terribly affected by high humidity, so if you don't feel it, you don't understand it. We have zero tolerance for cold in South Florida, but compared to most people I am an ice man. I go out to run when everyone else is wearing sweaters or light jackets wearing a short sleeve teen and shorts. But I feel miserable when it is hot and very humid, and that's been a problem for me all my life. It is the biggest reason why I stopped playing tennis. I loather our climate during the day for about 6 months a year.

If you've never been in this area when the humidity at night goes up close to 100%, you just don't understand how miserable it is.
 

Hitman

Bionic Poster
#15
Rafa has an academy now in Mexico, so it makes sense to play there also. Kills two birds with one stone, he gets to spend time in his academy and doesn't have to travel extensively to play the one 500 he plays in February. Also, he has IW straight after, on same surface and not so far to travel.
 

ibbi

Hall of Fame
#17
He's playing it to prepare for Indian Wells. Playing a clay court event to accomplish that wouldn't make much sense. I kind of wish he'd ditch all the 500s except the grass one at this point, but he seems to like playing Acapulco, and going by his comments after the Australian Open has it prioritized over even Miami, so... Whatever makes him happy, I guess.
 
#22
Since 2016 he has not played at Rio, but instead at Acapulco in February.

Now I am not sure why, because believe it or not, Nadal is better on Clay.

But what do this forum think, is it the right choice, does he do it to give the next gen a chance on Clay, or is it simply that he doesn't want to play Hard, Clay, Hard, Clay (thinking of sunshine doubles).
So Nadal should play Río on clay, and then practice and adapt again to hard to play Indian Wells and Miami, and then adapt again to clay...

Personally, I think he is doing fine. Acapulco is better in my opinion to adapt to hard courts before IW and Miami.
 

Fedeonic

Hall of Fame
#27
So Nadal should play Río on clay, and then practice and adapt again to hard to play Indian Wells and Miami, and then adapt again to clay...

Personally, I think he is doing fine. Acapulco is better in my opinion to adapt to hard courts before IW and Miami.
That's basically the only answer to this question. Acapulco has attracted quite a lot of top players since changing the surface to HC, just Federer is missing. Also, the monetary investment has been pretty high and it's paying dividends in that now Dubai, traditionally the best ATP 500, has been relegated to an average 500.

I had a Fedfan friend going to Acapulco in HC and she loved the facilities.
 
#28
Rafa has an academy now in Mexico, so it makes sense to play there also. Kills two birds with one stone, he gets to spend time in his academy and doesn't have to travel extensively to play the one 500 he plays in February. Also, he has IW straight after, on same surface and not so far to travel.
Yep, I thought this was common knowledge. He just officially opened it , which was all arranged as hes in the country for the tournament.
 
#34
That's basically the only answer to this question. Acapulco has attracted quite a lot of top players since changing the surface to HC, just Federer is missing. Also, the monetary investment has been pretty high and it's paying dividends in that now Dubai, traditionally the best ATP 500, has been relegated to an average 500.

I had a Fedfan friend going to Acapulco in HC and she loved the facilities.
Yes. Acapulco is now a high standing Masters 500 just like Dubai. Both are among the greatest Masters 500 on the tour along with Barcelona, Queens and Beijing.
 
#36
I don’t think Nadal should play either of those tournaments. At his age there’s no need to exert himself in a 500 tournament a week before two back to back Masters 1000s.
 
#38
Since 2016 he has not played at Rio, but instead at Acapulco in February.

Now I am not sure why, because believe it or not, Nadal is better on Clay.

But what do this forum think, is it the right choice, does he do it to give the next gen a chance on Clay, or is it simply that he doesn't want to play Hard, Clay, Hard, Clay (thinking of sunshine doubles).
I wonder why are you creating imaginary stories? :rolleyes:
 
#39
Acapulco is not much better, with an average high of 30.4 C (87 F) and 73% average humidity in February

Anyway, you just don't know with Nadal and tournaments not played on clay. He was scheduled to play in Acapulco last year but withdrew in the last minute
Hmm. It has been explained a zillion times why he withdrew from Acapulco last year.
 
#41
I love these explanations that have no connection to reality, but pretend to illustrate intimate knowledge about Nadal.

The probable reasons are:

1) money - his appearance fee is higher
2) less travel
3) he has businesses nearby, so it is easier to just be there and make a seamless transition
4) possibly the security situation in Rio is more problematic

:cool:
Fed devotee, you have always created fake stories about Rafa that have no connection to reality.
 
#46
Rafa has an academy now in Mexico, so it makes sense to play there also. Kills two birds with one stone, he gets to spend time in his academy and doesn't have to travel extensively to play the one 500 he plays in February. Also, he has IW straight after, on same surface and not so far to travel.
Rafa doesn't need his new tennis centre (it's not an academy) he inaugurated on Monday to "spend his time" in Mexico. He has partially owned two resorts in the Mexican island of Cozumel since 2013. The resorts are adjacent to each other and have tennis courts, including a hard court. He has spent his holidays and practiced there many times. His new tennis centre is about 30 minutes drive away from the city of Cancun (located on Mexico's Caribbean coast), and the flight distance from Cancun to Cozumel is about 75 km/ 47 miles.

Sunscape Sabor Cozumel & Secrets Aura Cozumel resorts he partially owns (the hard court was resurfaced after Rafa became a co-owner of the resorts):


Francisco Roig and Rafa in Cozumel before the 2016 Indian Wells Masters:



Rafa is currently in Cozumel (since Tuesday).
 
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#47
Nadal almost always has clay covered anyway. 2 Slams are on hardcourts and he's been putting himself consistently in position to win them (AO 2017 USO 2017 AO 2019). Might as well keep sharpening that HC game before the "Sunshine Double", no?
 
#50
Yep, I thought this was common knowledge. He just officially opened it , which was all arranged as hes in the country for the tournament.
The new resort complex on the Mexican Caribbean coast where Rafa's tennis centre is located opened its doors in November last year. They had a 3-month soft opening period before the Grand Opening that took place this Monday. You are correct that the inauguration of Rafa's tennis centre & the Grand Opening of the resort complex were scheduled for February because Rafa confirmed (in October) his participation in the 2019 Acapulco tournament.

Rafa and Carlos Moya visited the construction site last February, before the 2018 Acapulco tournament:

http://www.tennisnow.com/Blogs/NET-...)/Nadal-Launches-Tennis-Centre-in-Mexico.aspx


 
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