Is my frame damaged after stringing?

#1
Not sure if this is the right section to post but here it goes: I just picked up my racket from a tennis club who strung it for the first time, and have noticed some cracking in the paint of the frame on one side. I'm concerned this means the frame underneath has been compromised and that it is due to the string job. Any ideas? I've had the racket for years (APD GT) and have been stringing a full bed of ALU Power Rough @ 55lbs for approx. 8 years using a Babolat electric stringer in another shop. This is the first hybrid on this racket, Solico Hyper G mains @ 51lbs, Solinco X-Natural crosses @ 58lbs.

I'm also concerned about the wear showing on some of the crosses. Haven't hit with it yet and wondering if this is due to the person who strung it not moving the cross string as it's pulled through to avoid friction burns, or just that this string is super sensitive and this is a normal thing that happens with multis?

I believe the machine used to string this was a Gamma 6900 ELS.





 
#2
I'll keep an eye on this thread to see what our pals may have to offer. I have NO idea what would do that to a racquet, but there's definitely something happening with that chipping right next to the grommets. While I can also see that scuffing on the edge of the frame from where it probably scraped against the court, this chipping looks like something different. I haven't seen this before with anything I've worked on when stringing at home.

Your strings look like maybe the clamps weren't set tight enough and the strings got a little "grated" when they slipped through them. If the clamps were too tight, they'd probably leave little contact areas that are less shiny than the rest of the string and those contact areas might even look like they are squashed a little flatter than the rest of the string would still look rather round. But these spots on the black string look scuffed and slightly frayed, which is typical when some strings slip in the clams.

Edit: clamps, not clams. Clams only hold onto the strings when they feel like it - probably whey they're happy - and they can make a smelly mess of a string job. Carry on...
 
Last edited:
#3
It's an older racquet that has been restrung dozens of times. I'm pretty sure that the stringer is not at fault here, especially considering it's on the outside of the frame. Even if the frame mounts were shoddy, it wouldn't be on the inline of the grommet because the arms don't touch that part of the frame anyway. I think it just might be some flex in the head from the tensioner and the paint cracked under that movement.

As for the multi, it happens especially with a shaped string like hyper g. It could have been a lazy stringer but it's not really going to affect the performance.
 
#4
Your crosses are 58 and the mains are 51. Squashing will do that. Hyper G is shaped, so your crosses got scuffed when they were pulled against the mains. May have pulled too fast. No comment on selected tensions except I would have tried to talk you out of it.
 
#5
Your crosses are 58 and the mains are 51. Squashing will do that. Hyper G is shaped, so your crosses got scuffed when they were pulled against the mains. May have pulled too fast. No comment on selected tensions except I would have tried to talk you out of it.
This is exactly what I was thinking esgee48, significantly higher cross tension relative to main tension causing the frame to squash. Here's my logic for the tensions though, would love your thoughts:

I'm a 5.0 player, been playing with a full bed of ALU Power Rough on this racket @ 55lbs for as long as I can remember. I reached a point earlier in the year when I was playing 8+ hours/week playing hard, heavy tennis with some very strong players. Ended up with elbow pain for the first time in 30 years of playing. Played through it like a fool until I couldn't use my arm for anything so had to take the last 7+ months off. Back in action now and thinking I'm not as young as I used to be so need to explore softer options. So this is me experimenting now. A friend advised a set up where I drop the poly tension 10% and increase the multi to compensate. I tried a full bed of Hyper G (@53lbs) before my elbow gave out and LOVED IT! Had the ball on a string from anywhere in the court - flat shots, heavy spin, soft touches at net, so trying to replicate that with a softer combo. I tried the Volkl Psycho hybrid in my other racket last week at slightly different tensions but similar concept, however couldn't control the ball much hence the higher cross tension this time. Looking at this setup now I'm thinking I should have had the tensions a little closer together, but this experimenting is new to me so any feedback/advice will be gratefully received. I just bought a stringer too so well and truly on my way down the rabbit hole!!
 
#6
I'll keep an eye on this thread to see what our pals may have to offer. I have NO idea what would do that to a racquet, but there's definitely something happening with that chipping right next to the grommets. While I can also see that scuffing on the edge of the frame from where it probably scraped against the court, this chipping looks like something different. I haven't seen this before with anything I've worked on when stringing at home.

Your strings look like maybe the clamps weren't set tight enough and the strings got a little "grated" when they slipped through them. If the clamps were too tight, they'd probably leave little contact areas that are less shiny than the rest of the string and those contact areas might even look like they are squashed a little flatter than the rest of the string would still look rather round. But these spots on the black string look scuffed and slightly frayed, which is typical when some strings slip in the clams.

Edit: clamps, not clams. Clams only hold onto the strings when they feel like it - probably whey they're happy - and they can make a smelly mess of a string job. Carry on...
Thanks for clarifying Fuzz, though I will give them a sniff when I get home just to be sure. I think the scuffs are likely clamp related too as it's a soft string and the tension was relatively high so slippage more likely to occur. The string is also black so any mark will be highly visible vs a natural colored string...
 
#7
Just my observation on the string with what limited information we have. The string scuffing is not from the clamps or it would be right next to a grommet. Most likely from the tension head and nothing to worry about.
 
#9
Well, you asked. Probably 80% of the string bed's feel is from the mains. I have no issue with your 51, but why not 53 since that was your tension full bed? Now you can string your crosses ± 2-3# of your mains.You should also consider using thicker mains than crosses.
 
#10
Well, you asked. Probably 80% of the string bed's feel is from the mains. I have no issue with your 51, but why not 53 since that was your tension full bed? Now you can string your crosses ± 2-3# of your mains.You should also consider using thicker mains than crosses.
In a word: control. I haven’t played with a multi in so long that I’m concerned with the combined additional power of lowering the poly tension and throwing in the multi st the same time which I understand is a higher power string type to polys, hence the much higher tension to compensate for both factors. What’s the benefit of a higher gauge cross?
 
#11
I string on a Gamma Prog. II ELS, which has a tensioner that's similar to their 6900 ELS. I don't remember my machine's tensioner marking a softer string quite like what's in the pictures here. It's pretty much that dulling of the surface luster on the string from being pressed and not what looks like an actual abrasion. But when my clamps have slipped, a soft string sometimes looks a lot like that.

The ultra close-ups of the scuffs on your strings give a good look at those marks, but it's tough to see where they're at in your string bed - maybe not right near the edge of the string bed? But your very first picture gives us a look at the outside edge of the frame and the paint chipping right next to the grommet strip. That picture also shows some of that abrasion on a black string just inside the edge of the frame. Looks to me like that's where it would have been clamped. So I'm still thinking the clamps weren't used quite right here.
 
#12
In a word: control. I haven’t played with a multi in so long that I’m concerned with the combined additional power of lowering the poly tension and throwing in the multi st the same time which I understand is a higher power string type to polys, hence the much higher tension to compensate for both factors. What’s the benefit of a higher gauge cross?
Then do 53 # mains and +3 # for the crosses. Or do 55 # mains and 53 # cross.

A higher gauge cross means thinner. It will automatically string up tighter at the same ref tension because its cross section is less. This automatically provide the tightness you may want and the mains to slide easier for spin.
 
#13
That paint chipping could be from frame flexing while stringing, but it was probably already compromised. Very hard to tell from the closeup pics and not seeing the frame before it happened. It's also a frame that's been used quite a bit as there is scuffing near those chips. Some frames don't have great paint. I don't particularly care for the aero throat on some babolat frames so I don't have any particular experience with those, but I recently sold some Babolat PSLs that had been just hanging around in my bag for a while. I knew of a few small chips from court impacts a few times, but when I took them out of my bag I saw how much the paint had chipped and scuffed just from being carried next to each other in the bag. I'm not rough with my bag either. I ended up reducing my sale price because of it, and now I keep head covers on at least every other frame in the bag to prevent a recurrence. I don't think the chipping is by itself any sign of a problem with the frame.
 
#14
Then do 53 # mains and +3 # for the crosses. Or do 55 # mains and 53 # cross.

A higher gauge cross means thinner. It will automatically string up tighter at the same ref tension because its cross section is less. This automatically provide the tightness you may want and the mains to slide easier for spin.
Got it. Thinner cross sounds like something to try, but Increasing the mains to 53-55 means potentially aggravating my recent elbow issues again which is my reason for dropping it to 51. In your experience is merely adding the multi as a cross enough to remove risk of elbow issues and no need to drop main tension too much? I suppose it’s a matter of trial and error, trying to retain the same control/feel I had with the full poly bed with a hybrid setup...
 
Top