Is over 10 year out of date too old for a racket??

Mc2222

New User
I was wondering if pro’s will use dated rackets with a paint job?
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MP (Hewitt/Nalbandian era) it is clearly very out of date but I’m yet to find a racket I enjoy hitting as much as it. Think I got it around 2006?! I was wondering if I’m missing out on new technology or if the technology hasn’t changed too much over time?

Also.. any new models that closely resemble RDS 001??
 

TennisD

Professional
No, older racquet won't hamper you.
If you like it, play with it.
Pros typically play with what they used as teens. Painted to resamble newer models.

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This is the only answer - realistically racquets haven't changed much since the 80s so unless you're showing up with wooden frames not much is 'out of date'. If it feels good and you like it you're set! As for your question about pros: the majority of them do indeed use older models painted like current frames due to comfort/confidence/not having a reason to switch.
 

Mc2222

New User
Thanks for the reply! Sounds good! Will stick with the RDS001. Don’t seem a need to change, feel like strings are what’s evolving the most!
Was tempted by the DR98 even though it’s a little old now I’ve heard great reviews!
 

Mc2222

New User
Thanks for the reply! Sounds good! Will stick with the RDS001. Don’t seem a need to change, feel like strings are what’s evolving the most!
Was tempted by the DR98 even though it’s a little old now I’ve heard great reviews!
To need a change*
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
If the grommets and frame are intact, I see nothing wrong with using an older racquet. My only suggestion is NOT to demo any new Yonex frames. The temptation to switch could be overwhelming.
:p
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
Racquets do fatigue over time as the carbon fibers breakdown from play and stringing. The racquet will lose some of its power and feel softer. Federer will go through about 60 racquets a year to keep his racquets fresh (12 each season). I'm sure many others do the same. For lesser mortals (us), its no big deal and you usually just get accustomed to it over time (probably not noticing the change). On occasion, someone will really like that soft feel and have a hard time finding a new racquet because you're so used to it. I believe James Blake had that problem towards the end of his career. Myself, I like the crisp feel of new racquets and I restring frequently so I like to refresh often.

edit: thank you posters below for pointing out carbon fibers do not break down
 
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Subway Tennis

Hall of Fame
I think just keep using it. You can always demo other racquets to see "what's out there" while still enjoying the main frame that you feel most confident with.

You are going to save a lot of money and time in the long run!
 

BlueB

Legend
Racquets do fatigue over time as the carbon fibers breakdown from play and stringing. The racquet will lose some of its power and feel softer. Federer will go through about 60 racquets a year to keep his racquets fresh (12 each season). I'm sure many others do the same. For lesser mortals (us), its no big deal and you usually just get accustomed to it over time (probably not noticing the change). On occasion, someone will really like that soft feel and have a hard time finding a new racquet because you're so used to it. I believe James Blake had that problem towards the end of his career. Myself, I like the crisp feel of new racquets and I restring frequently so I like to refresh often.
Carbon fibres can not brake down from use. If they did, the racquet is broken. Bond between fibres (resin matrix) can loosen to some extent.

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kkm

Professional
Carbon fibres can not brake down from use. If they did, the racquet is broken. Bond between fibres (resin matrix) can loosen to some extent.

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Yeah, I’m amused by a couple things. One is that people see carbon fiber weave cosmetics applied to tennis racquets and even stringing machines and stuff, but most people don’t realize that the carbon fiber used for tennis racquets is unidirectional and doesn’t look like woven because each layer of unidirectional has fibers running in only one direction. The other thing is that commercial airplanes made using significant parts made of carbon fiber can withstand significant forces repeatedly over long periods and with huge “mileage” put on them, but carbon fiber tennis racquets somehow can’t survive more than between a dozen and couple dozen stringings without breaking down?
 

dr325i

Legend
Racquets do fatigue over time as the carbon fibers breakdown from play and stringing. The racquet will lose some of its power and feel softer. Federer will go through about 60 racquets a year to keep his racquets fresh (12 each season). I'm sure many others do the same. For lesser mortals (us), its no big deal and you usually just get accustomed to it over time (probably not noticing the change). On occasion, someone will really like that soft feel and have a hard time finding a new racquet because you're so used to it. I believe James Blake had that problem towards the end of his career. Myself, I like the crisp feel of new racquets and I restring frequently so I like to refresh often.
Yikes!
Better fly those Dreamliners now, because when they become "softer" (s the carbon fibers breakdown), crazy things may happen...
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
Carbon fibres can not brake down from use. If they did, the racquet is broken. Bond between fibres (resin matrix) can loosen to some extent.

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Yeah, I’m amused by a couple things. One is that people see carbon fiber weave cosmetics applied to tennis racquets and even stringing machines and stuff, but most people don’t realize that the carbon fiber used for tennis racquets is unidirectional and doesn’t look like woven because each layer of unidirectional has fibers running in only one direction. The other thing is that commercial airplanes made using significant parts made of carbon fiber can withstand significant forces repeatedly over long periods and with huge “mileage” put on them, but carbon fiber tennis racquets somehow can’t survive more than between a dozen and couple dozen stringings without breaking down?
Yikes!
Better fly those Dreamliners now, because when they become "softer" (s the carbon fibers breakdown), crazy things may happen...
Point taken. I admit I didn't know the actual mechanism so thank you for the correction.
 
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kkm

Professional
I'd love to see RA data of a racquet to back up the claim that it fatigues in a noticeable way with repeated stringing. I'd love for someone to take RA data starting with a new unstrung racquet, string it, play with it until it needs restringing, cut out the strings, check the unstrung RA, string it, play with it until it needs restringing again, on and on until it's been strung in the neighborhood of a couple dozen times, with unstrung RA data over time for comparison.
 

steveq81

Rookie
I was wondering if pro’s will use dated rackets with a paint job?
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MP (Hewitt/Nalbandian era) it is clearly very out of date but I’m yet to find a racket I enjoy hitting as much as it. Think I got it around 2006?! I was wondering if I’m missing out on new technology or if the technology hasn’t changed too much over time?

Also.. any new models that closely resemble RDS 001??
If it still gets the job done, then no real reason to change. If you have only one, maybe start looking for another in nice shape rather than looking for something "new and improved" and rotate them so they last even longer.

I still use the Prince CTS Synergy DB 24 midplus. Came out in 1992 and have yet to find anything that works better for me since I found some of these back in 2005 or so.

I also have five or six spare grommet/bumperguard kits. If you plan on keeping yours for a while I would suggest looking for grommet kits and grab a couple if you can find any.
 
I'd love to see RA data of a racquet to back up the claim that it fatigues in a noticeable way with repeated stringing. I'd love for someone to take RA data starting with a new unstrung racquet, string it, play with it until it needs restringing, cut out the strings, check the unstrung RA, string it, play with it until it needs restringing again, on and on until it's been strung in the neighborhood of a couple dozen times, with unstrung RA data over time for comparison.
-----
All I can tell you is that I have several performance players where two patients tell me the same thing.
Since I have been accompanying them for years with racket tuning, I also have the data of the older racquets in the archive.
With the RDC I can detect very small differences in measurement. Mostly the RA is stable over the years. I also have Calibration Racquets to check if my RDC still measures the same as years ago.
Apparently it is a head thing - I cannot imagine that a carbon frame loses stiffness - this would have to be accompanied by fine cracks or similar on the paint.
Have meticulously examined such rackets and found nothing in this direction.

Many people spend a lot of money to buy soft racquet frames - mostly the professional Racquets are softer.
So I can't do anything with the thesis that the racquet becomes softer by playing a lot.
Therefore I usually suggest that we do a "general service" - change the grommets, clean everything and mount a new basic. This helps in most cases.

While we are on the subject of professionals - I have an original Racquet from Thomas Muster from the years 1991 - 93 at my home.
Namely the Prestige 600 Classic Beam in green/grey.
Can therefore confirm that the "played" Racquet still has 65 RA - it has been strung for a good 30 years now.
According to the sticker, the Racquet was measured with 67 RA when unstrung.
And these are no faked data.
 

rommil

Legend
I was wondering if pro’s will use dated rackets with a paint job?
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MP (Hewitt/Nalbandian era) it is clearly very out of date but I’m yet to find a racket I enjoy hitting as much as it. Think I got it around 2006?! I was wondering if I’m missing out on new technology or if the technology hasn’t changed too much over time?

Also.. any new models that closely resemble RDS 001??
These are the bumblebee yellow with the gray on the sides? I loved those and they look sweet in action although I preferred the RDX 500 mids. Stick with them if you’re still loving them .
Yes I have been using the more forgiving Exone DR 98 but I miss swinging those older Yonex frames:)
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
That's enlightening. Hard to argue with objective data. I will note that RA is an arbitrary measure of overall flex, perhaps even a bias towards flex at the midpoint. I'm totally spit-balling here: perhaps resin breakdown (if it's the agent of racquet fatigue) does not register much on RA. Or the wearing down of the grommet and headguard plastic create a dampening effect. It could all be mental, but with a lot of players reporting perceptions of racquet fatigue, myself included, I imagine there is probably some mechanism to it. Or it could be in my head too I suppose.
 

kkm

Professional
That's enlightening. Hard to argue with objective data. I will note that RA is an arbitrary measure of overall flex, perhaps even a bias towards flex at the midpoint. I'm totally spit-balling here: perhaps resin breakdown (if it's the agent of racquet fatigue) does not register much on RA. Or the wearing down of the grommet and headguard plastic create a dampening effect. It could all be mental, but with a lot of players reporting perceptions of racquet fatigue, myself included, I imagine there is probably some mechanism to it. Or it could be in my head too I suppose.
I get the impression that even for many touring pros it’s mental.
 

kkm

Professional
Anyone who thinks that carbon fiber just breaks down easily should make or test stuff from it. Panels, maybe an i beam. And test all kinds of stuff, not just stuff made from composite materials, to see stress, strain and what not.
Depending what kind of stuff you’re making with carbon fiber and what the setup needs to be, you might be interested to see the stuff involved - breather, bleeder, and so on.
 

BlueB

Legend
Anyone who thinks that carbon fiber just breaks down easily should make or test stuff from it. Panels, maybe an i beam. And test all kinds of stuff, not just stuff made from composite materials, to see stress, strain and what not.
Depending what kind of stuff you’re making with carbon fiber and what the setup needs to be, you might be interested to see the stuff involved - breather, bleeder, and so on.
You are asking too much of average TT gearheads, now [emoji23]

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kkm

Professional
You are asking too much of average TT gearheads, now [emoji23]

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;)

I gotta say it worries me how much the spread of misinformation is continued by people working for the major brands, and even by so-called top tour stringers/technicians.
When people talk about things being “in their heads,” it makes me think back to Ivan Ljubicic saying that the tension being slightly off is what makes the difference between a ball being in, or a meter out. I’m not saying it makes zero difference, but timing, imagine being late on a shot, and strokes, overall will normally contribute more to a shot being in or out. Easy to blame the equipment/the stringer. I’ll see if I can find the video.

Edit: here’s the video, with the relevant Ljubicic soundbite from 1:50-1:59



This is interesting too:
 
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TennisHound

Legend
I was wondering if pro’s will use dated rackets with a paint job?
I have a Yonex RDS 001 MP (Hewitt/Nalbandian era) it is clearly very out of date but I’m yet to find a racket I enjoy hitting as much as it. Think I got it around 2006?! I was wondering if I’m missing out on new technology or if the technology hasn’t changed too much over time?

Also.. any new models that closely resemble RDS 001??
Theres no new technology that makes a difference.
 

brownbearfalling

Hall of Fame
If comparing similar spec’d frames (same headsize, weight, frame construction, etc) you might not even notice a difference. The players body changes more than racquet technology. Often times a player will seek out a different frame to accommodate for change in physicality.
 

NLBwell

Legend
are you saying that gut strings last longer?
why I don't believe you?
Gut or nylon, small head sizes with tight string patterns, and flat hitting.
Many people would break them more often, but many people wouldn't.
That's why they tried to publicize stringing as many times in a year as you play in a week - to get people to restring more often. People would wait until the strings broke before restringing, which would often be over a year.
I'd often have my wood rackets fatigue crack before the strings broke.
 
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