is there tennis after knee replacement?

robsanz

New User
I received some very bad news from my knee surgeon -- I have to have total knee replacement. This is no surprise to me because I have known for quite awhile that the arthritic damage in my knee was going to lead to this. In 1992 I had ACL reconstruction but the damage to the cartilage caused a constant deterioration that couldn't be stopped.

I'm a top 4.0 player, and now wonder if I will ever be able to play at that level again after knee replacement. Actually I'm wondering if I'll be able to play again. The information I have seen on the web has been contradictory and not helpful.

Today I talked to my tennis teacher from several years ago and asked him if he has seen anyone play tennis after total knee replacement. Mind you, he is one of those guys that gives lessons and plays every day so he has seen lots of tennis players at all ability levels. He said he hasn't hit with anyone with a knee replacement but has hit with some people with hip replacements that did good.

All of this is leading me to the question -- is singles tennis over after knee replacement? Are there some of you that can shed light on this question?

Don't get me wrong because I have no choice. I just want to know if I should consider taking up bowling and forget tennis. For me doubles just isn't an option I want to consider.
 

Nuke

Hall of Fame
Don't put too much stock in medical advice you get here -- ask your knee surgeon!
 

chair ump

Semi-Pro
Words of encouragement

Hi Robsanz,

Just because you will have a knee replacement doesn't preclude any more competitive tennis singles/doubles in your future...There are some new TKR technologies that allow the surgeon to perform the surgery using a minimally invasive approach to the knee. This will preserve more muscle and tissue goups, leading to a faster recovery and a more active post TKR lifestyle.

Of course, it is up to your surgeon's discretion to determine whether or not you are a candidate for such a thing. Being a strong 4.0 tennis player and living an active lifestyle pre TKR definitely helps the odds for a strong result after your surgery. I'm pullin' for ya man!

Best of luck,

-Ump
 

Geezer Guy

Hall of Fame
I agree with Nuke above, but I had a guy that worked for me get a total knee replacement, and he said his Dr. told him he would never be able to run again. Now, the guy was seriously overweight - it's not like he was running before. But, he said his Dr. told him that a knee replacement was a last-ditch effort to get your life back to pain-free.

You may not be able to play tennis, but you should be able to get around normally.

I have arthritic knee's myself, and asked my Dr about knee replacement and playing tennis. He said I should play tennis as long as I possibly can before considering the knee replacement. (Implying that I won't be playing after.)
 

ollinger

G.O.A.T.
The issue with knee replacement is not preservation of the muscle groups, so the less invasive technique is irrelevant to this discussion. The issue is trauma to the bone and replacement hardware. Every sensible surgeon I know feels tennis after either a knee or hip replacement is not a good idea. Two people I know who tried it (one with a hip, one with a knee) wound up needing revision surgery within two years -- and subsequently could barely walk without a cane.
 

chair ump

Semi-Pro
Yes, it's true to say that after TKR tennis is not the same as before...what I meant by my earlier post, is that I hope that it would be possible to enjoy playing after the surgery in 'some' capacity...perhaps I'm being too optimistic.
 

robsanz

New User
The issue with knee replacement is not preservation of the muscle groups, so the less invasive technique is irrelevant to this discussion. The issue is trauma to the bone and replacement hardware. Every sensible surgeon I know feels tennis after either a knee or hip replacement is not a good idea. Two people I know who tried it (one with a hip, one with a knee) wound up needing revision surgery within two years -- and subsequently could barely walk without a cane.
I went to a one hour knee seminar and they said almost the same thing -- in fact they said the less invasive technique is overrated and in some cases does more harm than good. Unfortunately when I asked about sports their answers were vague and inconclusive.
 

robsanz

New User
Don't put too much stock in medical advice you get here -- ask your knee surgeon!

That sounds reasonable, but so far I haven't received good answers from the two surgeons I have talked to. I think their attitude is "let's do the surgery and then wonder about the consequences afterwards".

I have spent a lot of time on the web researching this but can't find much that is objective -- it's mostly just web sites that hype the different brands of knees.

Has anybody in these forums had a TKR and went back to tennis? So far I haven't heard success stories but surely there must be.
 

robsanz

New User
Don't put too much stock in medical advice you get here -- ask your knee surgeon!
Almost all surgeon websites put singles tennis on the "do not do list". Perhaps it's that simple -- have a TKR and you shouldn't play tennis. That sort of sucks if true.
 

Loco4Tennis

Hall of Fame
i dislocated my left knee back in 1998, no surgenry was needed for me, but i had to have a brace for a while,
even to this day, the knee issue presents itself, my tendons are tight after heavy practise and or game, i am always consious of it even though i wear knee braces, their is lots of impact put on your knees in tennis
i know this is more bad news but its not impossible,
i do have to agree with the comment of not playing singles, i do like playing doubles alot, and its because of the knee factor
 

montx

Professional
I would suggest you get a 2nd and a 3rd opinion.

The most important thing is you get what help science can give you and what help faith can give you.

The first priority should be your health and if you can restore that, you might be able to continue tennis.

Definitely communicate with the doc and tell him your hopes.

Best of Luck
 

Fedace

Banned
I received some very bad news from my knee surgeon -- I have to have total knee replacement. This is no surprise to me because I have known for quite awhile that the arthritic damage in my knee was going to lead to this. In 1992 I had ACL reconstruction but the damage to the cartilage caused a constant deterioration that couldn't be stopped.

I'm a top 4.0 player, and now wonder if I will ever be able to play at that level again after knee replacement. Actually I'm wondering if I'll be able to play again. The information I have seen on the web has been contradictory and not helpful.

Today I talked to my tennis teacher from several years ago and asked him if he has seen anyone play tennis after total knee replacement. Mind you, he is one of those guys that gives lessons and plays every day so he has seen lots of tennis players at all ability levels. He said he hasn't hit with anyone with a knee replacement but has hit with some people with hip replacements that did good.

All of this is leading me to the question -- is singles tennis over after knee replacement? Are there some of you that can shed light on this question?

Don't get me wrong because I have no choice. I just want to know if I should consider taking up bowling and forget tennis. For me doubles just isn't an option I want to consider.
Your Surgeon will be able to tell you if you can play singles or not. you have to tell him how often you play and how many hours and so on. It would be best Not to go against your surgeon's advice on this. Also 2nd opinion from the sports medicine Physician specialist would be a very good idea. I know a physician who works for Chicago Bulls and he had told me in situation like yours, it is best to seek out sports medicine specialist opinion. it is the right thing to do. and if all fails, Doubles isn't so bad, really, after i screwed up knee, i just play doubles now, i have lots of fun. You will find that doubles is just as fun as singles.
 

couch

Hall of Fame
I received some very bad news from my knee surgeon -- I have to have total knee replacement. This is no surprise to me because I have known for quite awhile that the arthritic damage in my knee was going to lead to this. In 1992 I had ACL reconstruction but the damage to the cartilage caused a constant deterioration that couldn't be stopped.

I'm a top 4.0 player, and now wonder if I will ever be able to play at that level again after knee replacement. Actually I'm wondering if I'll be able to play again. The information I have seen on the web has been contradictory and not helpful.

Today I talked to my tennis teacher from several years ago and asked him if he has seen anyone play tennis after total knee replacement. Mind you, he is one of those guys that gives lessons and plays every day so he has seen lots of tennis players at all ability levels. He said he hasn't hit with anyone with a knee replacement but has hit with some people with hip replacements that did good.

All of this is leading me to the question -- is singles tennis over after knee replacement? Are there some of you that can shed light on this question?

Don't get me wrong because I have no choice. I just want to know if I should consider taking up bowling and forget tennis. For me doubles just isn't an option I want to consider.
Well, if it's any consolation my doubles partners' dad had both knees replaced at the same time and after the surgery he was moving a lot better than he did before. He actually gained an inch in height too because he was so bowl legged before the surgery. LOL He said the big thing after his surgery was that he was pain free and tennis was fun again.

This guy was always a good athlete but his knees (and hips) just deteriorated over time and he has now had both knees and both hips (just recently had his other hip replaced) replaced. I haven't seen him since he had his last hip replaced so I don't know how he's doing (on the court).

So I wouldn't say your tennis has to end but it all depends on your individual situation. Good luck.
 

robsanz

New User
Well, if it's any consolation my doubles partners' dad had both knees replaced at the same time and after the surgery he was moving a lot better than he did before. He actually gained an inch in height too because he was so bowl legged before the surgery. LOL He said the big thing after his surgery was that he was pain free and tennis was fun again.
How long did it take him to get back into tennis after his TKR? Did he ever consider playing singles, or just doubles?
 

JDIXONJR

New User
knee replacement

I had it four years ago and played in a 3.5 super seniors [on rubbico] and my team finished runner up in the Southern Section. I was subsequently elevated to 4.0.
If you have too much arthritis, they can't do the minimal invasion. I had too much.
I don't attempt to play on hard courts - I am 68, 73" tall and weigh 200 lbs. I play only on soft courts and only doubles.
The knee replacement does a good job of telling you when to slow down for a bit [not play every day hard]. You have to get used to the clicking and to being massaged at the airport security.
All in all, it greatly improved the quality of my life. I kayak, bike, play doubles and generally have a good old time for a relic. Before, I didn't want to do anything where I had to stand on hard surfaces. It was very painful. I wore an 'unloader' [Darth Vader] brace, which helped when I was active.
If life has become a burden with it, go for it. Ride a bike 15 miles a day for three weeks before the surgery and then let them [the PT's] give you full range of motion afterwards, even though it hurts like heck. You will get real tired of seeing the 'protractor' the physical therapist pulls out every day to give you 5 % more range of motion - let him or her do it and hit them later - it is what you need to do to return to being a normal jock.
Good luck and God bless.
 

him88002

Rookie
Only Time will tell about your replacement

I had ACL reconstruction with Meniscus repair and knee cap alignment in the same surgery, then had a staph infection. In the hospital for several months and my doctor told me I would be lucky to be able to do light jogging.
Fast Forward a year and a half and I feel great. I can move just as good if not better than before and experience no soreness.

The key for me was to take your rehab very seriously and really work your ass off on physical therapy. I did 4 hours of physical therapy a day for the first 5 months
 
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couch

Hall of Fame
How long did it take him to get back into tennis after his TKR? Did he ever consider playing singles, or just doubles?
Hey robsanz, I can't remember how long it took him to get back on the court. I do remember the doctor telling him he was just slightly behind schedule regarding his rehab so he was a little disappointed. Little did he know the doctor was talking about if he only had one knee replaced. LOL Remember he had both knees replaced at the same time. Again, can't remember how long it took but he got back relatively quickly for having both replaced at the same time.

Oh yeah, he pretty much plays doubles exclusively. He's probably in his mid-to-late 50's and with all his joint replacements he sticks to doubles.
 

Trainer

Semi-Pro
Learn to hit aces and return winners and you won't need a good knee...

Seriously, I think it would be possible to play at a lower level and just not run after a shot. Hit your shots, and if they can hit one that's out of your reach, they win.
 

robsanz

New User
Learn to hit aces and return winners and you won't need a good knee...

Seriously, I think it would be possible to play at a lower level and just not run after a shot. Hit your shots, and if they can hit one that's out of your reach, they win.
Should I tell my opponent that he loses the point if I have to run for a ball?
 

robsanz

New User
Don't put too much stock in medical advice you get here -- ask your knee surgeon!
That's not very realistic. Like most surgeons, he only tells me what I want to hear -- in ten seconds or less. I was hoping to hear from people in this forum that have had real experience with TKR.

I recently went to my the former tennis pro who I have great respect for and I used to take lessons from. He said he has seen some good results from hip replacements, but has never hit with anybody that had a knee replacement. This guy gets around so what he is saying doesn't sound encouraging. Out of the hundreds of people he hits with, none of them have had TKR.

Is there anybody out there with some real life experience with total knee replacement and tennis? Please, I want to hear from you whether the reality is good, bad, or otherwise!
 

couch

Hall of Fame
hey robsanz. I think it's all about trade-offs. I haven't had TKR but as I mentioned earlier my doubles partner's dad has and he seems to be doing really well with his. He's actually had both knees and hips replaced. He was in quite a bit of pain before his TKR and since he doesn't experience any pain in his knees.

It's hard to say if he's playing at the level he was before TKR, probably not, but he's playing and playing pain free so he's been very happy with his results.

And if your surgeon is only going to tell you what you want to hear then I would suggest seeing someone else that's going to shoot you straight.

Good luck-
 

robsanz

New User
hey robsanz. I think it's all about trade-offs. I haven't had TKR but as I mentioned earlier my doubles partner's dad has and he seems to be doing really well with his. He's actually had both knees and hips replaced. He was in quite a bit of pain before his TKR and since he doesn't experience any pain in his knees.

It's hard to say if he's playing at the level he was before TKR, probably not, but he's playing and playing pain free so he's been very happy with his results.

And if your surgeon is only going to tell you what you want to hear then I would suggest seeing someone else that's going to shoot you straight.

Good luck-
So far, the only success stories I have heard are older men that play recreational doubles. I assume that in their case success means playing at any level without pain, which is worthwhile but not exactly the answer I'm looking for.

I'm still trying to hear from those of you that have had total knee replacement, and were able to return to playing 4.0 level or above singles. Is this just a fantasy, or has anybody pulled it off?
 

Phil

Hall of Fame
Maybe the reason you haven't heard from anyone that has had TKR and returned to playing at their pre-op NTRP is BECASUE THERe ISN'T ANYONE LIKE THAT???

I haven't had TKR, but common sense says that a TKR recipient can NEVER return to his former level of play (if 4.0 or above). It's a tough pill to swallow, I'm sure...but rather than trying to squeeze out the answers you want to hear, you probably need to consider the possibility that what the doctors and the literature say is...true, and accept it.

Being able to play doubles is better than not being able to play at all...
 

robsanz

New User
Maybe the reason you haven't heard from anyone that has had TKR and returned to playing at their pre-op NTRP is BECASUE THERe ISN'T ANYONE LIKE THAT???

I haven't had TKR, but common sense says that a TKR recipient can NEVER return to his former level of play (if 4.0 or above). It's a tough pill to swallow, I'm sure...but rather than trying to squeeze out the answers you want to hear, you probably need to consider the possibility that what the doctors and the literature say is...true, and accept it.

Being able to play doubles is better than not being able to play at all...
So far my efforts to find someone with TKR have failed. Perhaps it just can't be done, bt if so I would like to know about it and why, and I would like to hear from real people.

For me, I would probably prefer to bowl over playing doubles. In the Phoenix area doubles has deteriorated to the point it's just not worth bothering with. In the Phoenix, AZ area those that do play singles.
 

couch

Hall of Fame
So far my efforts to find someone with TKR have failed. Perhaps it just can't be done, bt if so I would like to know about it and why, and I would like to hear from real people.

For me, I would probably prefer to bowl over playing doubles. In the Phoenix area doubles has deteriorated to the point it's just not worth bothering with. In the Phoenix, AZ area those that do play singles.
If I were you I would try to find TKR forums and ask your questions there. Might have better luck there.
 

Phil

Hall of Fame
So far my efforts to find someone with TKR have failed. Perhaps it just can't be done, bt if so I would like to know about it and why, and I would like to hear from real people.

For me, I would probably prefer to bowl over playing doubles. In the Phoenix area doubles has deteriorated to the point it's just not worth bothering with. In the Phoenix, AZ area those that do play singles.
Okay, good luck with that.

But...it's hard to believe that there're no good doubles in a hot weather city like Phoenix. You're a 4.0-which is good, but we're not talking about you having to find professional players to match your own skills. 4.0's are out there, everywhere. If you would rather bowl than play doubs, then you're just not all that serious about the game (of tennis that is).
 

robsanz

New User
I agree with Nuke above, but I had a guy that worked for me get a total knee replacement, and he said his Dr. told him he would never be able to run again. Now, the guy was seriously overweight - it's not like he was running before. But, he said his Dr. told him that a knee replacement was a last-ditch effort to get your life back to pain-free.

You may not be able to play tennis, but you should be able to get around normally.

I have arthritic knee's myself, and asked my Dr about knee replacement and playing tennis. He said I should play tennis as long as I possibly can before considering the knee replacement. (Implying that I won't be playing after.)
Well so far that's about what I'm hearing. Once you have TKR, tennis just isn't much of an option. Of course now I can't play anyway, so perhaps knee replacement will make me no worse off.
 

robsanz

New User
Okay, good luck with that.

But...it's hard to believe that there're no good doubles in a hot weather city like Phoenix. You're a 4.0-which is good, but we're not talking about you having to find professional players to match your own skills. 4.0's are out there, everywhere. If you would rather bowl than play doubs, then you're just not all that serious about the game (of tennis that is).
This is off topic -- but actually tennis has dwindled for all types of tennis in Phoenix. Doubles has suffered the worst. You would be very surprised how difficult it is to play tennis in the Phoenix area. Most of the year we have the weather, but we don't have the interest.

Times have changed here in Arizona, and not for the better when it comes to tennis.
 

robsanz

New User
I don't attempt to play on hard courts - I am 68, 73" tall and weigh 200 lbs. I play only on soft courts and only doubles.
The knee replacement does a good job of telling you when to slow down for a bit [not play every day hard]. You have to get used to the clicking and to being massaged at the airport security.
QUOTE]

Could you describe the source of your pain? I figured since the joint was replaced there wouldn't be pain.

I think hard courts are the source of many of the health problems us club players are suffering. Unfortunately all we have in Phoenix is hard courts so playing on softer surfaces just isn't going to happen.

I know many people who stopped playing and most of the time it was due to knee, back, hip, or elbow problems. All of those problems except elbow are probably because we play nothing but hard courts.
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
I don't know anyone that has had TKR, but I do have a friend that is a 4.0 playing on my 4.5 team, that had hip replacement. While he certainly did lose his movement, and doesn't play singles anymore, he still plays doubles at a high 4.0-4.5 level. While he may not be able to rely on his speed as a weapon, I think he concentrates more on strategy, placement, positioning and anticipation.

I am someone who depends on my speed to play. When I was recovering from ACL, the first 6 mos I was playing (after initial 4-5mos of just PT), I lost that weapon, and needed to concentrate on other parts of my game because I knew I wasn't going be running down any balls (or even try). I naturally started playing alot of doubles during this time (less running!), and focused on serving, volleying (particularly mid court half-volleys) and lobbing.

If you got to the 4.0 level because you're a retriever (ie. you depended on running to get balls back to frustrate your opp), it might be harder for you to continue to play at that 4.0 level, until you're able to rely on different weapons. While my comments are not based on any TKR experiences, I'd like to think that if TKR allowed me to at least walk swiftly (vs. run), then I'd still be able to play competitive 4.0 doubles.

good luck
 
D

Deleted member 23235

Guest
For me, I would probably prefer to bowl over playing doubles. In the Phoenix area doubles has deteriorated to the point it's just not worth bothering with. In the Phoenix, AZ area those that do play singles.
Oops, missed this post about doubles (my last post talks about reverting to doubles from singles)... that's too bad that you're not interested in doubles.

When I was a 3.5-4.0 I used to be very anti-doubles... but after I discovered how to play doubles the right way (ie. I used to play a singles game on the doubles court because I had no clue how to volley), it opened a new dimension of the game to me, and in the end it really helped my singles game as well... but overall it's just given me a greater appreciation for tennis (singles and doubles).
 

drak

Hall of Fame
Okay Robsanz I know SEVERAL tennis players whi have had TKR's in the last 3-5 yrs, they are 3.5's - 4.5's. Most are playing BETTER than before because they were os limited by their conditions. A couple (out of 8-10) are struggling a bit, IMO due more to to their overall poor physical condition than the knee replacement. Interestingly the two 4.5 guys I play against who had it done has some of the best success - why? Because IMO they were in better shape going in and took the rehab very seriously. Oner plays very competively in the Nat 55 mens - so there ya go!

BS on all the other crap.
 

Salavanti

New User
That's not very realistic. Like most surgeons, he only tells me what I want to hear -- in ten seconds or less. I was hoping to hear from people in this forum that have had real experience with TKR.

I recently went to my the former tennis pro who I have great respect for and I used to take lessons from. He said he has seen some good results from hip replacements, but has never hit with anybody that had a knee replacement. This guy gets around so what he is saying doesn't sound encouraging. Out of the hundreds of people he hits with, none of them have had TKR.

Is there anybody out there with some real life experience with total knee replacement and tennis? Please, I want to hear from you whether the reality is good, bad, or otherwise!
I had my left knee replaced on Nov. 10. I was hitting balls 5 weeks after surgery ....not moving too well laterally but doing ok. I am 65.

I have a friend who had both knees replaced at the same time. He was in his mid fifties. He was back playing after 4 months. He now plays singles twice a week and doubles twice a week.
 

Salavanti

New User
I had my left knee replaced on Nov. 10. I was hitting balls 5 weeks after surgery ....not moving too well laterally but doing ok. I am 65.

I have a friend who had both knees replaced at the same time. He was in his mid fifties. He was back playing after 4 months. He now plays singles twice a week and doubles twice a week.
I forgot to mention... I was a 4.5 before my knee ingury.... didn't play for a while and my rating went to a 4.0



. My friend is a 4.5

Sal
 

basil J

Hall of Fame
My father inlaw who is now 79 had his knee replaced 10 years ago. He got himself lean and strong before surgery and really worked at rehab. He was back on the court 6 months later with a slight limp, but still ran down every shot as best as a 69 year old could. He play s doubles 3 times a week only on clay and tennis keeps him sane. His movement really coincides with his body weight and overall fitness.
I'll be trhilled if I am still alive and playing at 79, singles or double.!!
 

jrod

Hall of Fame
From what I've heard about TKR, doctors try and delay doing this as long as possible. From what I understand, the installed hardware and repair only last's about 10 years with normal wear and tear. Doing a 2nd TKR is quite difficult and not recommended so they want to push it out as far as possible.

Hopefully the technology has improved, but I can understand why playing tennis at a 4.0 level might not be a good idea post recovery. You should probably look into how long the new knee will last you with/without tennis and what your options are when it wears out.
 
As a physician, I hear what the patient doesn't....and orthopedists generally think it's nuts to play tennis with a replaced joint. The fact that things may go well initially is not the issue. The issue is that the trauma will lead to quicker degradation of the bone the joint is placed in, and it will fail sooner. The options the second time around may be more limiting and more deblitating. A replaced joint typically lasts ten years IF it is treated gently.
 

robsanz

New User
As a physician, I hear what the patient doesn't....and orthopedists generally think it's nuts to play tennis with a replaced joint. The fact that things may go well initially is not the issue. The issue is that the trauma will lead to quicker degradation of the bone the joint is placed in, and it will fail sooner. The options the second time around may be more limiting and more deblitating. A replaced joint typically lasts ten years IF it is treated gently.
The knee surgeon I talked to said that it's far easier now to replace worn parts in the artificial knee. Is he being overly optimistic?

What other problems may be made worse by playing tennis with an artificial knee?

I have yet to find good information on what kind of knee would be best for me. Do you know where to get this kind of info? It seems that doctors all think the joints they use are best, but I suspect it's mostly because they are loyal to whoever gives them the payola.
 

goober

Legend
So far my efforts to find someone with TKR have failed. Perhaps it just can't be done, bt if so I would like to know about it and why, and I would like to hear from real people.

For me, I would probably prefer to bowl over playing doubles. In the Phoenix area doubles has deteriorated to the point it's just not worth bothering with. In the Phoenix, AZ area those that do play singles.
That's nuts. Those that do play, play singles in Phoenix? There are plenty of doubles players around. The vast majority that I have met that are old enough to have a TKR all play doubles in fact. Try talking to Tom Hauser. He is pretty well known teaching pro in the area and had a TKR. He won some fairly high level doubles event I want to say last year. I think he is based at PTC, but I am not sure on that. PM me if you want his email.
 

robsanz

New User
That's nuts. Those that do play, play singles in Phoenix? There are plenty of doubles players around. The vast majority that I have met that are old enough to have a TKR all play doubles in fact. Try talking to Tom Hauser. He is pretty well known teaching pro in the area and had a TKR. He won some fairly high level doubles event I want to say last year. I think he is based at PTC, but I am not sure on that. PM me if you want his email.
I disagree with you on the doubles. Check out the senior USTA draws and you will se what I mean. Hey -- for me I can't play singles or doubles so the issue is somewhat academic.

I would like to contact Hauser, so please send me his email.
 

goober

Legend
I disagree with you on the doubles. Check out the senior USTA draws and you will se what I mean. Hey -- for me I can't play singles or doubles so the issue is somewhat academic.

I would like to contact Hauser, so please send me his email.
It might be academic but are you talking USTA draws as in tournaments? I'll agree those are mostly singles but that represents a minority, a very small minority of players. The vast majority of tennis player don't play in tourneys.

Check out these


-ATA- all doubles with many players over 50. Over 200 teams with 12-15 members per team

-USTA senior leagues: all doubles.

-USTA adult leagues: Way more doubles players than singles. Most of the teams are filled with older regular doubles players at the 3.0-4.0 levels who seem to never get bumped. They recruit 2-3 young guys to fill the singles lines.

Pretty much all drop in play at every center I have played in the valley is doubles.

Anyways I'll send you his email. He is a friendly guy so I think would be willing to share his experiences.

edit: you will have to send me an email first through my profile. Your email function is disabled.
 
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rfkent

New User
Knee replacement

I had a knee replacement a little over a year ago 9/2010). I am 53 and was limping around playing USTA 4.0 tennis and in a fair amount of pain. After TKR the first several weeks were rough. The pain is formidible, but with diligence in rehab I was hitting balls in 3 months. I now play competitive USTA 4.5 doubles with no pain or limp. I do not play singles as I do not want the wear and tear of singles on the new knee.

Just reassurance to all if you are considering TKR there can be high level tennis afterward with hard work in rehab and patience.. I am getting to balls that I have not touched in 10 years..

I also know a former tennis professional Craig Wittus who had the same and is playing a very high level (5.0+)

Rfk
Ellicott City, MD
 

ardallen

New User
Six weeks post TKR

I am a 66 year old solid 4.0 female six weeks post TKR. I have had a very good experience so far. I am done (as of Friday) with outpatient physical therapy, and have come along unusually fast. I have been on the court hitting serves on several occasions, and am ready to go hit some balls with my husband, who has the ability to hit them TO me, so that I don't have to move too much. I am very aware that this was major surgery, and it takes a long time to heal, so I'm trying not to let how good I feel allow me to do something stupid. I am hopeful of being able to stay playing at the 4.0 level, but only time will tell. Like many of us die-hard tennis players, I have played in pain for more years than I would like to admit, and had already learned to maximize what I CAN do with my limited mobility. I long ago gave up singles. A brace kept me on the court for the last six month before the surgery, but the knee took a dramatic turn for the worse (severe knock-knee), and I had no choice but to finally do it.

So, is there tennis following TKR? I certainly hope so. I'm giving it my best shot.
 
ardallen
you've already done something stupid --- you're six weeks post-surgery and you've already "been on the court hitting serves on several occasions." This is actually stupid in TWO respects --- too soon to be putting your knee through something like that, and serve practice is probably not a good idea at 66 given the wear and tear on the shoulder.
 
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