Is William Renshaw the GOAT?

1477aces

Hall of Fame
He won seven straight wimbledons when it was the biggest and really only event that mattered (and he couldn't travel around the world to play either). Why isn't he the GOAT? you guys all are ignorant, you haven't even seen him or his high standards of competition play and yet you put him down.
 

kiki

Banned
he may very well be.I don´t know if his brother Ernie would have objections to that, though.
 


Before Tilden...There was Renshaw! He is a certainly a tennis legend, but is often overlooked because like forzamilan90 said, he was a 19th Century player and the format in which he won his 7 Wimbledon titles is very different than the one we have today. But nonetheless he helped revolutionize the sport with his "Renshaw Rush" tactics and he helped Tennis become a more popular sport. I'd say that Willie Renshaw was tennis's first big superstar, but you guys can correct me if I'm wrong on that one.
 

Mustard

Talk Tennis Guru
Why isn't he the GOAT? you guys all are ignorant, you haven't even seen him or his high standards of competition play and yet you put him down.
Oh? Who's put William Renshaw down, then? The fact is that it is very hard to judge when it comes to players from the 1880s, at a time when there were only 2 big tournaments, on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and very few players managed to play in both.

With Laurie Doherty, we can say that he was the first player to win one of the big two tournaments, and then cross the Atlantic to win the other big tournament, as he did in 1903. With Tony Wilding, he can say that he was the first player to dominate tennis outside of his own native continent. With William Renshaw, we come back to the fact that he was dominant at home and at Wimbledon, in particular, but the lack of travel in that era makes it hard to judge when compared with future greats.
 
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1477aces

Hall of Fame
Oh? Who's put William Renshaw down, then? The fact is that it is very hard to judge when it comes to players from the 1880s, at a time when there were only 2 big tournaments, on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, and very few players managed to play in both.

With Laurie Doherty, we can say that he was the first player to win one of the big two tournaments, and then cross the Atlantic to win the other big tournament, as he did in 1903. With Tony Wilding, he can say that he was the first player to dominate tennis outside of his own native continent. With William Renshaw, we come back to the fact that he was dominant at home and at Wimbledon, in particular, but the lack of travel in that era makes it hard to judge when compared with future greats.
People can come up with similar arguements to ignore players from the 50's or 60's.
 

elegos7

Rookie
What his record on clay courts
At the time Renshaw played (1880s, early 1890s) there were no clay court events of any significance in Europe. Even the Riviera tournaments started only in the second part of the 1890s.
The Renshaws practised on the Riviera in the winter, but there were no tournaments where they could have played.

I also think the second-most prestigious event was the Irish Championships, far exceeding in importance the American Championships. Those few American players who visited England (Sears, Dwight, Campbell) were outclassed by British players, it was only in the second part of the 1890s that they (like Larned, B. Wrenn) could rival them.
 

Mustard

Talk Tennis Guru
People can come up with similar arguements to ignore players from the 50's or 60's.
There's a lot more footage, reports and more widespread tennis travel in the 1950s and 1960s, compared to the 1880s. It's hard to judge Renshaw's brilliance relative to other all-time greats as a result.
 

1477aces

Hall of Fame
There's a lot more footage, reports and more widespread tennis travel in the 1950s and 1960s, compared to the 1880s. It's hard to judge Renshaw's brilliance relative to other all-time greats as a result.
different standards in many fields. not as much footage as modern matches too.
 
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