Ivan Lendl - backhand lag

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by Xfimpg, Sep 15, 2018.

  1. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    More fascinating stuff. Check this out. See how Lendl loads up on the backhand, but most importantly the racquethead lag he creates when he rips the ball for a winner (00:02).

    If you compare the first and second videos, the second is a more composed and "conservative" backhand.



     
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  2. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Legend

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    By "loads up" do you mean that he has stretched certain muscles? Which muscles?
     
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  3. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    I meant loading up in a general sense. If I were to guess more specifically, it looks like the right arm and hips are loading up more than usual and he's pushing the racquethead way before the handle, looking for extra "snap".
     
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  4. JohnYandell

    JohnYandell Hall of Fame

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    xf,
    Where did you get the second clip?
     
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  5. Chas Tennis

    Chas Tennis Legend

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    Loading is probably another very common tennis term that has no definition.

    The first video has too much motion blur to see the racket position.

    I don't see any snap in either video.

    For the second video, I look at the line between his shoulders and the line between his hips and consider the separation angle between the shoulders and hips lines (same as for a forehand). That lengthens and maybe stretches his abdominal obliques and maybe spine muscles. Maybe shoulder muscles are stretched then also. Then I watch the line between the shoulders turn forward. That seems important especially if the chest presses on the upper arm as his might be doing, is it touching? I try to get a best guess of the rotation axis for the upper body and racket. Is it through his neck and spine..? How is his pelvis being turned (every thing above the pelvis is affected). If his rotation axis were his spine, where would the racket head placement produce the most speed, where less speed? Racket head between his legs or up to the left? Where is his arm at various times during the forward motion? Is it straight? Is the first part of his forward swing being done by his obliques and spine muscles, with maybe some pelvis turn? When does he separate his upper arm from his chest by using more shoulder muscles? He does not appear to step forward into the ball so, 'body weight into the ball' is probably not a factor on that backhand.
     
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  6. Dou

    Dou Rookie

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    anybody can do it, to the maximum of his physical ability.

    the lag is for both power and control. and I'd say for the recreational players, more importantly for control.

    anyone can backhand throw the frisbee a long way, but why very few have good 1hbh?

    the key is in the lag. the wrist needs to be absolutely dead/relaxed so that the face can be closed and stay closed into contact. this gives the player the confidence/control to rip the ball as hard as possible.
     
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  7. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    Youtube, search "Lendl backhand".
    I tried posting the link here for you but TTW keeps converting it to video.
     
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  8. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    I think I may actually be doing this without even knowing it. No, not saying I'm Lendl, not at all. Just found it interesting to see it so well defined and obvious in the motion.
    I remember seeing Lendl vs Connors in Montreal in 1987, but I no specific recollection of the match, just a few blurs here and there. Just remember two things; how much Lendl jumped into the court on his serve and his thighs... huge.
     
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  9. nvr2old

    nvr2old Professional

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    Key on BH and FH for that matter is grip position and racquet drop just prior to impact to produce RHS and angle of racquet face to ball contact. Feels magical.
     
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  10. JohnYandell

    JohnYandell Hall of Fame

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    Thanks--more illegal pirating of that video I did so ago... but...
     
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  11. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    It happens... you are forgiven. :)
     
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  12. Dragy

    Dragy Professional

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    Shame you didn’t make an HD record from close up with your smartphone!
     
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  13. Xfimpg

    Xfimpg Professional

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    Well that would have been hard to do in 1987. :)
    Wish my family would have been into Camcorder's, though. I had a really good vantage point. I remember Lendl slicing and slicing to Connor's forehand, then he would hit high topspin to it to change it up, Connors would come off his feet to make contact.

    I also saw the Edberg vs Becker match that day, but that's for another thread. But in short, Edberg kick-served Becker's a** off the court that day. Becker couldn't handle it.
     
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