Kyrgios Tension Main vs Cross

ichaseballs

Semi-Pro


pretty common to see pros lower their cross tension. (mains are longer, so the variance leads to a more even bed)
many people say yonex recommends this cross tension drop along with 2 pc stringing. something about the isometric shape needing it.
nick being a yonex guy, thought he would do this. at the same time, he doesn't seem that obsessive about his gear.
 

esm

Hall of Fame
the butt cap seems to be more flared than a normal Yonex... or is it the angle.. ? 8-B
 

sanister

Professional
TW is playtesting blue yptp in the strings section. Kyrgios's racquets would look fantastic with some blue strings (y)
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
I said this before, players on this board are much more concerned with their gear than professionals.

I know a few future players and they dont even care if it is 2 or 4 knots.
We had one Challenger player ask for 2 knots. In conversation later, he told us someone told him it was better so he just asks for it. He didn't care either way and doesn't really check when he picks up.

We asked another player why he used a particular string. He said he gets it for free and he's not picky.
 
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Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
We had one Challenger player ask for 2 knots. In conversation later, he told us someone told him it was better so he just asks for it. He didn't care either way and doesn't really check when he picks up.

We asked another player why he used a particular string. He said he gets it for free and he's not picky.
the WTA girls used 2/4 knots for the same reason....somebody told them one way or the other was better. Some of them, however, checked.... I had to redo a string job because I missed the 4 knot request on the stringing tag. #PITA!
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
(mains are longer, so the variance leads to a more even bed)
Not really. The mains are generally going to be pulled tighter than the crosses anyway - even if the reference tension setting is the same for the mains and crosses. The crosses are woven against the mains before tension is pulled. Therefore, there is significant friction to overcome (with respect to the woven strings) when pulling tension on the crosses, whereas for the mains this is not the case.

Some claim that having the crosses pulled loser than the mains opens up the sweet spot of the racquet. That may well describe the resulting feel. But what such a differential actually does is it decreases the length of the resulting racquet, which in turn results in a wider hoop (sometimes people call this “squashing”). This assumes, of course, that no measures are taken prior to stringing the racquet to maintain the shape of the racquet after the stringing process is complete.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
A friend who helps run a men’s future in my home town told me last year that any players who did specify 2 or 4 knots - all but 1 wanted 4 knots. Interesting.
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
the WTA girls used 2/4 knots for the same reason....somebody told them one way or the other was better. Some of them, however, checked.... I had to redo a string job because I missed the 4 knot request on the stringing tag. #PITA!
A friend who helps run a men’s future in my home town told me last year that any players who did specify 2 or 4 knots - all but 1 wanted 4 knots. Interesting.
Similar at my last Challenger: 2 players specified 2-knots (including one who didn't actually care). A handful of others (maybe 3 or 4) inquired what was we strung as standard (4 knots). Everyone else didn't seem to care.
Interestingly, the two who specified were ATP, and all the inquirers were WTA.

Are there differences between 2/4 knots, tension differentials, ATW, etc.? There probably are.
Will these differences make significant contributions to my game? Probably not. If there are any advantages, they're likely low-yield. Technique and conditioning are always high-yield.
 

McEncock

Semi-Pro
Not really. The mains are generally going to be pulled tighter than the crosses anyway - even if the reference tension setting is the same for the mains and crosses. The crosses are woven against the mains before tension is pulled. Therefore, there is significant friction to overcome (with respect to the woven strings) when pulling tension on the crosses, whereas for the mains this is not the case.

Some claim that having the crosses pulled loser than the mains opens up the sweet spot of the racquet. That may well describe the resulting feel. But what such a differential actually does is it decreases the length of the resulting racquet, which in turn results in a wider hoop (sometimes people call this “squashing”). This assumes, of course, that no measures are taken prior to stringing the racquet to maintain the shape of the racquet after the stringing process is complete.
that's why I do a 4 pounds differential in the "other" way : 40p main / 44p cross for the same string. I feel better snapback and a more homogeneous string bed
 

Lukhas

Legend
Perhaps choosing between two and four knots can be a manufacturer's request. Yonex seems to prefer four knots to ensure the racquet crosses are strung top to bottom. I believe Head and Prince also prefer to have the cruises strung that way.

That said, I'm not sure if any pro stringer would actually string bottom up even if not specified...
 

TagUrIt

Hall of Fame
The recommended stringing pattern from YONEX is a two piece. I would go with the manufacturer since they suggest it.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
I must admit that I am more surprised that he uses a 1.2mm gauge. I thought pros typically used 1.25mm +.
I’m not all that surprised, given that his frame is reportedly not weighted up like most of his peers.

What does surprise me though, is that he usually doesn’t change to a new stick when new balls come out. He seems to play with 1 racquet a lot longer than most (unless he smashes one, of course).
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@am1899 - it doesn't surprise me. Kyrgios is as close to a tennis bum as we have now. He is, in a lot of ways, a wonderful throwback. He doesn't have a coach - unless you count the fan in the stands he asks where to serve on match point - his game is wide open and inspired by how he feels, no real adherence to a set game plan - he plays doubles more regularly than his peers - he is great with the fans.

Despite his mental walkabouts, I love to watch Kyrgios and think he's great for the game. I just wish he was a bit saner. :)
 

Shaolin

G.O.A.T.
@am1899 - it doesn't surprise me. Kyrgios is as close to a tennis bum as we have now. He is, in a lot of ways, a wonderful throwback. He doesn't have a coach - unless you count the fan in the stands he asks where to serve on match point - his game is wide open and inspired by how he feels, no real adherence to a set game plan - he plays doubles more regularly than his peers - he is great with the fans.

Despite his mental walkabouts, I love to watch Kyrgios and think he's great for the game. I just wish he was a bit saner. :)
He does have that full time physio trainer that looks like Tobias Fünke.
 

sanister

Professional
Nick wraps his OG with the square end first and finishes with the tapered end, this is probably what makes it look more flared.
I do it that way as well. I'm def in the minority but I find the finish to be much cleaner that way overall and I've been doing it that way for so long it's become habit. Also I find that the glue on the taper side sticks to replacement grip when you start it at butt and creates a mess sometimes leaving sticky residue when taking off. If you finish with taper end at top you can wrap the sticky glue taper end on the overgrip itself and it is easy to come off without sticking anywhere on the racquet.
 

LOBALOT

Hall of Fame
My son's coach taught me to do it that way too!

As far as Nick I think he is fun to watch and an amazing athlete. He struggles with his emotions on the court like a lot of tennis players. We were at his match in Cincinnati last year for the big blow up. It was really too bad as he was playing very well and then we were all very confused as he started losing his emotions and we could not tell what set him off until we read about it after.

During that match he hit the biggest forehand I have ever seen. Absolutely crushed a missile of a forehand.
 

volleynets

Hall of Fame
I said this before, players on this board are much more concerned with their gear than professionals.

I know a few future players and they dont even care if it is 2 or 4 knots.
One reason they have to care less for your example is that they will break those strings in like 30 minutes so they don't worry about things like that that may result in better tension maintenance etc
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
One reason they have to care less for your example is that they will break those strings in like 30 minutes so they don't worry about things like that that may result in better tension maintenance etc
You don't think tension maintenance matters at the pro level? Sure they might break them quickly (30 minutes is a big exaggeration though). But they hit so hard that the strings loosen up much faster too. That's why they want fresh strings every match.

Is there a difference in tension maintenance (or anything else) between 2 and 4 knots? Maybe. But if pro players, the ones who are most likely to feel and care about such differences, don't obsess over it, maybe we shouldn't either. I'd also like to note that at my last D1 tournament, most players didn't even drop off any racquets for restringing.

If you want your racquets strung one way or another, that's fine. But understand that any advantage, if any, is probably low-yield anyways.
 
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volleynets

Hall of Fame
You don't think tension maintenance matters at the pro level? Sure they might break them quickly (30 minutes is a big exaggeration though). But they hit so hard that the strings loosen up much faster too. That's why they want fresh strings every match.

Is there a difference in tension maintenance (or anything else) between 2 and 4 knots? Maybe. But if pro players, the ones who are most likely to feel and care about such differences, don't obsess over it, maybe we shouldn't either. I'd also like to note that at my last D1 tournament, most players didn't even drop off any racquets for restringing.

If you want your racquets strung one way or another, that's fine. But understand that any advantage, if any, is probably low-yield anyways.
The tension matters a lot. But they don't use any frame for a long time. I think Roger switches every 7 games? The strings probably get played with for just ten minutes each not including change overs . Nadal uses RPM which loses tension incredibly fast so he just switches frames often to a brand new string job.

There's rare cases of pros who use the same string all match but most go through several fresh strung racquets.
 

[d]ragon

Hall of Fame
The tension matters a lot. But they don't use any frame for a long time. I think Roger switches every 7 games? The strings probably get played with for just ten minutes each not including change overs . Nadal uses RPM which loses tension incredibly fast so he just switches frames often to a brand new string job.

There's rare cases of pros who use the same string all match but most go through several fresh strung racquets.
Tension maintenance is still important at the highest level. In those 7 games, elite players put an incredible amount of stress on their strings, probably more than most rec players will in weeks and months I reckon. If a string to lose tension fast enough, these players would probably notice a drop in performance. Yet ALU and RPM remain the two most popular strings around. Also, whether pros change racquets because they actually feel the difference or if they want to be preemptive about maintaining performance, that remains to be seen. I'd have to ask around. The main point here is if there is to be any actionable difference, pro players would be the ones to feel it. Maybe they do, but they certainly don't complain about it nearly as much as rec players do.

I am not arguing whether tension maintenance, or equipment in general, matters; they definitely do. My main argument whether a particular stringing method, or any other minor adjustment, would produce significant, actionable differences in performance for most players. I continue to attest they do not and express my disdain for people put place too much emphasis in such low-yield areas. Let's not attempt to squeeze every last drop of juice from small lemons that have already been squeezed whilst ignoring the big, juicy ones right in front of our faces. Most high level players don't obsess over tiny details. Rec players shouldn't either.

This is a very important topic to me because I see it all too often, even in myself. The sooner we stop obsessing over the small things, the sooner we can start focusing on the things that really, really matter.
 
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