Learning from the best...

Ash_Smith

Legend
England Fly-half George Ford on working with Jonny Wilkinson...

"His work ethic was unbelievable, probably the best that there's ever been. It does rub off on you, but it's the type of practice he does, rather than the time he spends doing it.

"It's not whether you're out there for two hours, it's what you get out of it, and that's what he's good at, coming up with little practices.

"We come up with little skill games, games within games, coming out of the session feeling better about yourself and what you're trying to achieve," said the 22-year-old.
Skill development in a games based environment - not just repetitive practice of a single skill. Take note people :)
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
Yes, of course, as an adjunct to repetitions. Skill-honing games using constraints have been utilized in America for a long, long time.

England Fly-half George Ford on working with Jonny Wilkinson...



Skill development in a games based environment - not just repetitive practice of a single skill. Take note people :)
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
"There was no secret technique in Lansdorp's repertoire. His big thing was repetition, which had a critical side effect: it taught extreme stroking discipline. Robert had this big, supermarket-size shopping cart filled with balls, and whatever we were working on --preparation, take the short mid-court ball, the running forehand that became my trademark shot --we would do it for an hour, or my half of the hour that I shared with Stella. We did drill after drill after drill."

"Eliot Telscher thinks that Robert has a genius for feeding balls --a job you wouldn't think is that difficult. But Eliot is right; Robert put the ball in exactly the right place, time after time. And we're talking about hundreds of balls an hour, day after day. I hit a million balls and that was important --I had to get that muscle memory, burn it in so it was a natural thing."
-Pete Sampras
 
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Dags

Hall of Fame
JW was quite famous for staying behind after training to practise his kicking. One of the drills I've seen on camera is that he would set the ball on the try line, and aim at the single upright (reminded me a bit of cricket, when you see bowlers aiming at a single stump).

I've taken to practising my serve once or twice a week, which is a similarly solo pursuit. Any suggestions of how to turn that into a games based environment? I have cones.
 

Scotttran94

New User
"Practice doesn't make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect."

Keep in mind that in Tennis change is forever constant. We have to be able to use all of our ranges of motion with power AND speed through an endless amount of different dimensions (due to varieties of opponents).

Disciplining a stroke could only work for so long until everyone is has their own disciplined stroke. In my opinion something that is taken very slightly is our foundation of everything and our senses. Those are the only things you can count on to always be on the battle field with you everyday. Your foundation is what has to fight against change and decide what to add or discard for that situation present right? Or is that too simple thinking? Someone help me out lol
 

shindemac

Hall of Fame
I am gonna employ single variable integration into my practices. The hamster wheel is still churning in my head, and once it stops spinning, I'll see what ideas stick. I think subconsciously, my mind has already started to do this. When you practice everyday, you tend to develop the same routines and exercises to practice. It gets boring really fast, so I'm naturally adding small variations, but I don't know if i'd call it single variable integration yet.
 
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