Learning racquet?

#1
Hi I need some help on this one please. Iv been playing tennis for about 10 years for fun but never learned technique properly so just been using mostly flat shots so iv never actually improved really. I really want to learn proper top spin so i can actually get better, been watching YouTube videos lol. Im using an older HEAD YOUTEK IG RADICAL MP - 2011 year
which apparently isnt a great racquet for learning on and is for experienced players. So im looking to buy a racquet with a larger head size , open strings with a larger sweet spot. Im 27 and 6"2 so i dont need an over sized racquet.

Im looking at these which is on sale, do you guys recommend it? Im open to other options

Wilson Ultra 103S Racquet

http://www.tennisonly.com.au/Wilson_Ultra_103S/descpage-U103S.html

or Wilson Ultra XP 100LS Racquet

http://www.tennisonly.com.au/Wilson_Ultra_XP_100LS_Racquet/descpage-UXP100L.html

or Prince Textreme Warrior 100
 
Last edited:
#3
Dont you think its easier to learn on a larger head size because its more forgiving? Im not being couched so my technique is always kinda bad unfortunately
 
#8
I also recommend you to stick with that racquet, it's a pretty good one. And when you raise your level you can add lead tape and customize it to your like.
By the way, when you say you don't need an OS racquet, well, the Ultra 103 is that.
 
#10
For you I would not recommend using spin effect racquets. Using spin effect racquets will not create topspin if you only know how to hit flat. If anything, they would only make your shots worse, since the extremely open string pattern will have too much trampoline effect and will launch the ball long. I would go with something more moderate like racquet with a 98-100 inch head size and a 16x19 string pattern. If you're worried about injuring your arm then choose one with a slightly lower stiffness rating like 60-66 RA. Don't get a racquet that is too light though, because the arm will feel more impact from the ball, but also not too heavy that your arm gets too tired. I would look for something in between 11.0 to 11.6 grams (strung), with a head light balance. A good example of this would something like the Yonex DR98, Wilson Blade 98, or some Prince racquets. Also don't use poly strings, instead go with softer types like synthetic gut or multifilament strings.
 
#11
For you I would not recommend using spin effect racquets. Using spin effect racquets will not create topspin if you only know how to hit flat. If anything, they would only make your shots worse, since the extremely open string pattern will have too much trampoline effect and will launch the ball long. I would go with something more moderate like racquet with a 98-100 inch head size and a 16x19 string pattern. If you're worried about injuring your arm then choose one with a slightly lower stiffness rating like 60-66 RA. Don't get a racquet that is too light though, because the arm will feel more impact from the ball, but also not too heavy that your arm gets too tired. I would look for something in between 11.0 to 11.6 grams (strung), with a head light balance. A good example of this would something like the Yonex DR98, Wilson Blade 98, or some Prince racquets. Also don't use poly strings, instead go with softer types like synthetic gut or multifilament strings.
Volkl 8 300g
 

n8dawg6

Hall of Fame
#12
For you I would not recommend using spin effect racquets. Using spin effect racquets will not create topspin if you only know how to hit flat. If anything, they would only make your shots worse, since the extremely open string pattern will have too much trampoline effect and will launch the ball long. I would go with something more moderate like racquet with a 98-100 inch head size and a 16x19 string pattern. If you're worried about injuring your arm then choose one with a slightly lower stiffness rating like 60-66 RA. Don't get a racquet that is too light though, because the arm will feel more impact from the ball, but also not too heavy that your arm gets too tired. I would look for something in between 11.0 to 11.6 grams (strung), with a head light balance. A good example of this would something like the Yonex DR98, Wilson Blade 98, or some Prince racquets. Also don't use poly strings, instead go with softer types like synthetic gut or multifilament strings.
id string the rad mp w a good syn gut or multi and rock on. 18x20 will make you hit a parabola/topspin for margin. not too heavy so you can develop RHS. predictable. perfect learning frame!
 
#13
Im kinda surprised no one likes those 2 wilson ones, can anyone tell my why they are not good. Their such a good deal lol
 
Last edited:
#15
Im kinda confused so with elbow pains is that from the strings not a heavy racket? so a heavy racket is actualy good for your elbow becuase it abosrbs more impact? yea im a strong guy 6 "2 if that makes a difference. the pain is very slight anyway not a big deal i actualy heard tennis elbow is from bad technique not the racket

Can i ask why you guys Prince Textreme warrior 100 is better than the wilsons ones, is it just because of the string layout.
 
Last edited:

nvr2old

Professional
#17
So my 0.02 after returning to game recently. As my avatar suggests I really like the Head radical MG (right to left I the pic pro, OS, and MP and then a Prince Textreme Pro 100P). All of the radical MG are considered pro spec racquets albeit "older" not be confused with outdated technology. They offer softer flex and control type string patterns and provide low power meaning you have to provide the power which honestly is no problem with a good swing. I actually bought the Wilson ultra 103s first at TW booth in Indian wells and really didn't like it. Had to swing too slowly and lacked control and ball would fly very easily. Much happier with all of my other racquets I got after that and have no problem getting topspin or power. Topspin is a matter if technique more than racquet IMO. I'm not one to use pro racquets but look at what they use. Not 16x15 103s but 16x19's, 16x20's, 18x20's etc. IMO stick with the MG MP and change strings and learn mechanics. My 0.02. Ken

Ps if you really want a larger racquet get a MG radical OS, 107 si head and forgiving. And very reasonable cost. $89.95 at TW.
 
#18
So my 0.02 after returning to game recently. As my avatar suggests I really like the Head radical MG (right to left I the pic pro, OS, and MP and then a Prince Textreme Pro 100P). All of the radical MG are considered pro spec racquets albeit "older" not be confused with outdated technology. They offer softer flex and control type string patterns and provide low power meaning you have to provide the power which honestly is no problem with a good swing. I actually bought the Wilson ultra 103s first at TW booth in Indian wells and really didn't like it. Had to swing too slowly and lacked control and ball would fly very easily. Much happier with all of my other racquets I got after that and have no problem getting topspin or power. Topspin is a matter if technique more than racquet IMO. I'm not one to use pro racquets but look at what they use. Not 16x15 103s but 16x19's, 16x20's, 18x20's etc. IMO stick with the MG MP and change strings and learn mechanics. My 0.02. Ken

Ps if you really want a larger racquet get a MG radical OS, 107 si head and forgiving. And very reasonable cost. $89.95 at TW.
thanks for the reply . When people tell me the radical is for players that already know the mechanics and its better to learn on a slightly larger rackets is that not true?

Also how would changing my string type make it easier to learn on. does it increase the sweet spot if its lower tension you mean?
 
#19
Hey everyone i actually found my racquat online to give you a better idea

HEAD YOUTEK IG RADICAL MP -2011

  • Head Size: 98 sq. inches / 632 sq. cm
  • Length: 27 inches
  • Strung Weight: 11.1 oz. / 315 grams
  • Unstrung Weight: 10.4 oz. / 295 grams
  • Balance: 3 Points Head Light
  • Swingweight: 320
  • Flex: 62
  • Beam Width: 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm
  • Composition: Graphite, YouTek, Innegra, D3O
  • String Pattern: 18 Mains x 20 Crosses
  • Recommended String Tension: 48 - 57 lbs.
  • Grip: Head Hydrosorb Pro
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/HYIRMP/HYIRMPReview.html
 
Last edited:
#20
Im kinda confused so with elbow pains is that from the strings not a heavy racket? so a heavy racket is actualy good for your elbow becuase it abosrbs more impact? yea im a strong guy 6 "2 if that makes a difference. the pain is very slight anyway not a big deal i actualy heard tennis elbow is from bad technique not the racket

Can i ask why you guys Prince Textreme warrior 100 is better than the wilsons ones, is it just because of the string layout.
There can be various causes of elbow pain. If your technique is very abrupt and tight, as opposed to smooth and relaxed, then any racquet can cause those issues. It might be easier to get away with poor form and technique using very light racquets, but in the end its counterproductive to improvement. Sometimes players with decent technique may still get injured from using equipment (racquet and strings) that are too firm/stiff, especially if they have the tendency to overplay. If me being 5'7" with a slight build can handle using a 12oz racquet for 4 hours straight then a person of your build should be able to as well.

The warrior 100 seems like a middle of the road type of racquet, should work well for most people.

but it has a larger sweet spot which means their good for learning topsin on? well thats the theory, are you saying its wrong
It doesn't really matter. You can learn topspin using any racquet, you just need to understand stroke mechanics. Its worth noting that different string patterns will each have different effects on the height of your shot.

Also I rather not pay too much attention to "sweet spot" size, focus more on the feel of the racquet instead.

The specs of your racquet look fairly good, its close to what most good players like.
 

nvr2old

Professional
#21
Not sure I can answer the bigger is better learning question. I literally learned on wooden 60 si racquet so today's racquets seem huge. That being said my fav head size is prob 100 si so far. Big enough sweet spot and maneuverable but not too large as to feel awkward. Cant answer the string question as I'm still figuring out the dizzying options. If you can demo some frames that might help. Bottom line is probably get something you like in terms of feel and look and comfortable it with good lessons and practice. Playing is the best way to get better. Ken
 

nvr2old

Professional
#22
Hey everyone i actually found my racquat online to give you a better idea

HEAD YOUTEK IG RADICAL MP

  • Head Size: 98 sq. inches / 632 sq. cm
  • Length: 27 inches
  • Strung Weight: 11.1 oz. / 315 grams
  • Unstrung Weight: 10.4 oz. / 295 grams
  • Balance: 3 Points Head Light
  • Swingweight: 320
  • Flex: 62
  • Beam Width: 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm
  • Composition: Graphite, YouTek, Innegra, D3O
  • String Pattern: 18 Mains x 20 Crosses
  • Recommended String Tension: 48 - 57 lbs.
  • Grip: Head Hydrosorb Pro
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/HYIRMP/HYIRMPReview.html
Honestly looks like a great racquet to me. Not sure I'd change. Good luck. Ken
 
#23
thanks for the reply . When people tell me the radical is for players that already know the mechanics and its better to learn on a slightly larger rackets is that not true?
Mansour Bahrami learned with a bloody dustpan. Borg learned with a wood racket. You'll do perfectly fine with a Radical MP.

The only things that should get you to change your mind on what racket you're using are:
1) Racket sponsorship (if it's free and/or you're getting paid to use it, take the one you like the best and go with it)
2) You're racket is broken (and not just cracked, cause for some people, cracked isn't even enough to stop them from kicking ass)
3) Your name is Mansour Bahrami and you're not actually using a racket, and should actually pick one up before looking to play professionally.

If anything, the pros and cons of a 18x20 can be argued. It mostly boils down to preference down the road when you understand what you want in a racket.

But don't get tricked into thinking the racket matters to your ability to learn the game or your ability to play the game well. If you do, you'll get into the honeymoon trap where you buy a new racket every 3-6 months looking for "the holy grail of rackets" to improve your tennis rather than going out to practice. If anything fresh strings are preferred over dead strings, but that's about it (and even then, some good players still don't care).
 
#24
basically everyone here is asking me to ignore all the advice from "experts" that talk about buying a racket for a beginner to learn on, about larger head, open strings, lower weight, larger sweet spot. you guys have really turned it upside down for me lol

also would someone who's been playing for 10 years without any good technique still be considered a beginner as my case is?
 

BlueB

Hall of Fame
#25
Hey everyone i actually found my racquat online to give you a better idea

HEAD YOUTEK IG RADICAL MP -2011

  • Head Size: 98 sq. inches / 632 sq. cm
  • Length: 27 inches
  • Strung Weight: 11.1 oz. / 315 grams
  • Unstrung Weight: 10.4 oz. / 295 grams
  • Balance: 3 Points Head Light
  • Swingweight: 320
  • Flex: 62
  • Beam Width: 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm / 21.5 mm
  • Composition: Graphite, YouTek, Innegra, D3O
  • String Pattern: 18 Mains x 20 Crosses
  • Recommended String Tension: 48 - 57 lbs.
  • Grip: Head Hydrosorb Pro
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Reviews/HYIRMP/HYIRMPReview.html
That's great specs. By the time you put an overgrip and dampener it would be about 323g and 4 pts head light. What gave you the idea it's heavy? It's actually slightly light for a guy of your size... Also it is pretty soft, so safer for your arm then much stiffer and even lifhter OS frames on your shortlist.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

BlueB

Hall of Fame
#26
also would someone who's been playing for 10 years without any good technique still be considered a beginner as my case is?
No, not exactly a beginner, but you'd have lots of ingrained bad habits... It will take time and effort to replace them by good technique.
Instead of spending time on new racquets, get a coach for few hours, to show you good stroke mechanics.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 
#27
basically everyone here is asking me to ignore all the advice from "experts" that talk about buying a racket for a beginner to learn on, about larger head, open strings, lower weight, larger sweet spot. you guys have really turned it upside down for me lol

also would someone who's been playing for 10 years without any good technique still be considered a beginner as my case is?
Oversized racquets aka "game improvement" racquets are usually for older people or people who aren't that athletic. They allow you to use only a short swing but still get good distance on your shots. Most people who are moderately athletic should go for "tweener" racquets or player's racquets if you're more advanced.

IMO, if you've played for 10 years but only occasionally and with improper technique then I would consider the level of play as low, in other words "beginner", especially if there is not much ball control. But I think if you're able to stay competitive with others and often play with strategy then maybe intermediate level.
 
#28
Oversized racquets aka "game improvement" racquets are usually for older people or people who aren't that athletic. They allow you to use only a short swing but still get good distance on your shots. Most people who are moderately athletic should go for "tweener" racquets or player's racquets if you're more advanced.

IMO, if you've played for 10 years but only occasionally and with improper technique then I would consider the level of play as low, in other words "beginner", especially if there is not much ball control. But I think if you're able to stay competitive with others and often play with strategy then maybe intermediate level.
what about the whole sweet spot thing for learning is that not true? do you feel the same way about open string patterns of 16 Mains / 15 Crosses is that for old people too ?
 

Wilhelm

Professional
#29
what about the whole sweet spot thing for learning is that not true? do you feel the same way about open string patterns of 16 Mains / 15 Crosses is that for old people too ?
The sweet spot on your stick is already big. Very open patterns might interest you once you learned to hit with a lot of top spin. But I suggest you follow the good advice here to stop worrying about your racquet – it is a good one!
 
#30
Your racquet is perfect. Spend the money on a few lessons.

Restring your current frame with synthetic gut 17 gauge (any one will do) around 48-50 lbs
Get a coach or take some lessons
Have fun out on the courts and save yourself HOURS of reading threads, getting conflicting answers on frames/strings, and lots of money/headaches.

I would rather be Roger Federer with a Walmart frame, than me with a custom frame :D:D:D
 

nvr2old

Professional
#31
Hey ten189. Theses are just our opinions not hard facts. There are so many options and we all have our favorite racquets and styles of play. It's great you asked but maybe you should try the Wilson Ultra 103s. You might love it. Can you demo? Or find a local instructor and start lessons and then demo during lessons and get some actual learning sessions. Anyway let us know what you decide and how it goes. Ken

Ps was typing my response while above post was being done. Great advice there.
 
#32
basically everyone here is asking me to ignore all the advice from "experts" that talk about buying a racket for a beginner to learn on, about larger head, open strings, lower weight, larger sweet spot. you guys have really turned it upside down for me lol

also, would someone who's been playing for 10 years without any good technique still be considered a beginner as my case is?
I don't know what these "experts" are telling you but that racket has a pretty low weight, big head, and large sweet spot.... Plus a low flex that will help your arm.... String pattern really isn't that big of a deal at your level.. spend the money on lessons, not a new racket...
Edit: you can hit a fine amount of topspin with 18x20, it's in the stroke mechanic.... If you want to improve and use this forum, film your strokes, you'll get a lot more helpful feedback....
 
Last edited:

topspn

Hall of Fame
#33
I learned to play as a kid with Dunlop maxply wooden racquet. Heavy and by today's standards minuscule head size. Worked out perfectly fine so stick with your radical and work on your technique
 
#34
I understand what everyone is saying, anything is possible, you can learn on a smaller head size fine its all about technique and your right the racquet is far less important. I guess im just curious to try a more forgiving racquet as i try and learn i dont know what i like, but ill take your advice and not go oversize or really open strings the boosooka racquat as you guys say lol, ill just go a slight step from 98 to 100 and from 18/20 to 16/18 strings and if the racquart is on sale helps. My racquats is 5 years old so kinda want a fresh one anyway

Im looking at the Prince Textreme warrior 100 its $100 off atm

http://www.tennisonly.com.au/Prince...EXVg23g10ziwBcc9aXtwReH2ZtGioqZYijRoCy6Xw_wcB

Does anyone else have any recommendations for a similar racquat or the Wilson ultra 100 ul has the same strings and size but is lighter should i go with that one. its also on sale?

http://www.tennisonly.com.au/Wilson_Ultra_100_UL_Team_Racket/descpage-WU100T.html
 
Last edited:

BlueB

Hall of Fame
#35
Go with Warrior, if you must change. It's a nice all round racquet and not as harsh as similar ones from Babolat or Wilson.

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 

BlueB

Hall of Fame
#36
Oh, and your jump will really be from 95 to 100 sqin :) Head used to have screwed sizing, so the older Rads were not really 98 as written on them...

Sent from my SM-G930W8 using Tapatalk
 
#38
basically everyone here is asking me to ignore all the advice from "experts" that talk about buying a racket for a beginner to learn on, about larger head, open strings, lower weight, larger sweet spot. you guys have really turned it upside down for me lol

also would someone who's been playing for 10 years without any good technique still be considered a beginner as my case is?
Being an expert in one field doesn't always transfer to other fields. Being an expert on selling cars translates well to being an expert on selling rackets, but doesn't translate well to being an expert on teaching you how to drive well.
 

nvr2old

Professional
#39
ten189. Have you gone to the learning center on TW site and clicked on "selecting a racquet"? Lots of good info there. I have 2 Prince TT tour 100P that I really like. I have heard the Warrior is a great racquet also. Ken
 
#40
So no one recommends those racquets i listed ?
i thought we all were recommending the first racquet on your "list" - ie. the radical.
i'm still using the predecessors of your "old" 2011 racquet (the ti and lm)
i'm 4.5.
i promise that no racquet you buy will improve your game, as much as the (free) time you spend just practicing... (racquet companies will disagree of course).
as long as you're not playing with a "toy" of racquet (ie. kids racquet).
maybe if you didn't have a racquet at all i might recommend the others on your list... but if you're just starting out, i'd probably still recommend getting like 2 used radicals (maybe OS) on **** for like 50$ each.

also walking on court with just 2 matching racquets, no bag, no covers, and clearly battle worn, is very intimidating (compared to the guy with matching bag, shirt, newest racquet, etc...) :p
 
#43
Last edited:
#45
Little personal experience.

I have been playing for a few years, but with improper technique. I used an oversized, light, and stiff frame when I was competing in highschool(I think a head titanium). This would help me "get by" with bad form and short strokes. I could arm the ball and get good depth.

Fast forward to now. I bought a Yonex Dr 98, and first day of practice I was terrible! I had no depth or control. I found out it was because my habit of arming the ball. Buying a player's racquet almost forced me to reexamine my stroke mechanics, and relearn how to get power and generate racquet head speed through using the kinetic chain.

Long story short, I think using a player's racquet will force you to learn how to generate power. I am enjoying tennis much more now by using better form.
 
Top