LED lighting for tennis court?

Discussion in 'Other Equipment' started by obana48, Oct 2, 2011.

  1. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    does anybody have experience playing on court with LED lighting? How do you feel about the quality of lighting?

    Any recommendations for LED manufacturer, colour temperatures of light source and needed power for a single court?
     
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  2. i3602u

    i3602u Rookie

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    no don't know anything about it but it sounds cool.

    Are you building a court? Why are you wondering?
     
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  3. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    The court is built years ago. Now I need good lighting for it. I have heared many good things about modern LED lighting for sports (except the price :). And I'm interested in experience recommendations. It looks as an economically balanced solution. At least on paper....

    Anyone?
     
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  4. nhat8121

    nhat8121 Semi-Pro

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    they installed one at my local park, then took it out b/c it wasn't bright enough and put back the old lights.

    so, you probably need to install more of them to compensate, but it looks cool.
     
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  5. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    If I need to install more, than I would go for regular bulbs.

    Looks like the solution is good on paper only.... No one can confirm?
     
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  6. i3602u

    i3602u Rookie

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    They have the high powered LEDs so I would like at that which is better
     
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  7. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    I'm answering to my questions :) Some expert from a lighting forum conclude that the current LED technology is still far from being able to present economically feasible solution for a street and sports lighting. There are several reasons

    a. LED chips used in floodlights are still have poor light output. They have even less light output in color temperatures of 3000-6000K (the lower the temperature the warmer the color. And the warmer the light the less output). I believe we need 4000-5000K (daylight with clouds) for a better color rendering.

    b. LED chips have watt loss and overheat. They need good conditioning :)

    c. LED chips with hight light output (140-160lm/W) which is on pair with HID bulbs are still very expensive.

    d. No one can confirm that LED chips can work 50000-100000 hours. Some people say that in a year or two of work LED chips can loose 50% of their light output.
     
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  8. infg35cpe

    infg35cpe New User

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    ^yup, that is correct. in my industry i've worked with led lighting and for a tennis court LED's wouldn't be an effective solution at all.
    they are best used for smaller applications.
    regarding led chips. i've used led chips in several applications for over 2 years now and they have not lost any percentage of their output. they are still as bright as the day they were installed.
     
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  9. AR15

    AR15 Professional

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    The city I live in recently installed LED lights as replacement lights in the overhead fixtures that light a 4 lane divided highway. They seem to work fine for this application. The lights are much higher than tennis court lights, and make me believe that if they were lowered, they would work fine on tennis courts.
     
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  10. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    Have seen couple of videos on YT showing a single tennis court with LED lighting installed. They use 20 or 24 LED floodlight (10 or 12 floodlights on each side). They replaced 5kW traditional lighting with 2.5kW LED lighting declaring they archive more lux and better uniformity.

    Not sure how this costs, but I guess it's much much more than traditional bulbs
     
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  11. rst

    rst Rookie

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    http://www.elektor.com/news/world-s-first-tennis-court-with-led-lighting.1251280.lynkx

    i dont know if this link is factual or a fraud or not???

    "Tennis club 'Volley' in Eindhoven, the Netherlands, is the first in the world to employ a fully LED illuminated tennis court."

    "LED lighting for sports venues not only results in energy savings due to lower power consumption (typically 30–40%.). In practice the savings can be as high as 50% .........."

    "The lighting system is dynamic and complies with all relevant standards for luminosity per surface area. ........."
     
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  12. vivaana

    vivaana New User

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    Yes, We Can !

    I have just seen this post now.
    We switched on the first court in 2009 and, until now, we have more than 40 courts lit by Hi-Power LED.
    I believe we made very good experience and most of comments from players and teachers at the clubs are more than positive to enthusiastic.
    We did it with (mostly) 5000k temperature, in some cases higher but I don't personally recommend it.
    The best tech. result we got it's 0,92 uniformity in an indoor double court structure with wooden ceiling.

    All of "our" courts are indoor or "convertible" :), but we'll switch on soon outdoor courts with 4 or 6 poles each, keeping great uniformity (>0.84). With 4 poles only seems even better at the lighting project level.

    I don't think I'm allowed to publish our link here but if you google around you'll easily find some info from Italy.
     
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  13. vivaana

    vivaana New User

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    #13
  14. dje31

    dje31 Professional

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    Over time, this is likely to become the go-to solution, but it's a high cost of entry right now. To get the output needed is probably cost-prohibitive at present. Lots of MFR'ing R&D costs to recoup.

    That being said, when they get the technology---and price---down, it should be an excellent alternative, and relatively cheap to operate. Instant on / off is also a plus.
     
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  15. vivaana

    vivaana New User

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    I wouldn't say so ...
    Of course it's depending by many factors like energy cost and hours of daily usage but we offered even payback in less than 3 years, in more than a case increasing the lighting level pretty much.
    Don't forget that most of the clubs use 400W HID fixtures and the typical decay of those bulbs and fixtures must be considered.
    Thanks
     
    #15
  16. IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS

    IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS New User

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    Guy any News about LED lighting? I have bought a chinese LED reflector with 200w but after 5 monthes they started to blink or burn.

    Any advise?
     
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  17. IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS

    IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS New User

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    Guy any News about LED lighting? I have bought a chinese LED reflector with 200w but after 5 monthes they started to blink or burn.

    Any advise?
     
    #16
  18. lwto

    lwto Hall of Fame

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    THey put some in at GreenLake tennis courts.

    They are very bright and you will lose the ball in the light.
    2nd, they didn't put them very high so at night.. if you lob, I tend to topspin lobs, you lose the ball in the darkness and then it pops back out once it's back in the light.

    They are blindingly bright.
     
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  19. IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS

    IGOR RODRIGUES DE ASSIS New User

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    Thanks Iwto!

    How height is the poles, do you know? What is the potential installed in each pole?

    Thanks again
     
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  20. stapletonj

    stapletonj Professional

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    my dad was a lifetime industrial light bulb guy. (GE) He died in 1985. right before he died was when GE was mucking about with all this. His opinion was that this would eventually revolutionize the industry.
    The biggest cost of lighting is not the bulbs and it isn't the electricity.

    The second biggest cost is the cost of labor and lost production to change bulbs when they burn out.
    The biggest cost is slower production and cost of injuries due to sluggishness and/or not seeing clearly because of low light.

    Short term, regular lighting is cheaper. Long term, the new lights are significantly cheaper.
    (This assumes you do not get hooked in to a seller who charges ridiculous prices and counts on your ignorance, of course that's true about everything)
     
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  21. Naijatennis

    Naijatennis New User

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    Hi, I have installed some LED lights on our courts in Nigeria. Check out http://aaa-lux-lighting.com
    They are manufactured in Holland and designed specifically for sports. They are a great solution and although initial cost is expensive the savings you can make in the long run are massive.
    We installed just 4 luminaries to cover 2 courts on 12m high poles. We are getting an average lux of at least 250lx per court.
    You can check out the end result that we got here: http://www.abacuslighting.com/news.asp?id=268
     
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  22. John

    John Rookie

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    It's a desaster after our court got new led lights. It became political issue to switch back despite numberous complain and cries. So don't do it.

    The light coverage is poor, lots court area had no light or poor lights. Despite the court inside the line is bright, you have to run through different brightness from behind base line toward net.

    Difficult to,serve because you will see direct lights from above.

    Over all brightness is lowered.

    Don't do it, don't claim led works, or welcome to join our panic group.
     
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  23. Noah Swift

    Noah Swift Rookie

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    LED lights were just installed on my high school courts as well as the local parks, and the high school ones do not even light the net anymore, and at the park it makes your eyeballs hurt. I felt like I was looking at three balls each time because of the shine off of the ball fuzz. They stink, it makes me frustrated to play under them.
     
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  24. obana48

    obana48 New User

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    Interesting. I started this thread almost 7 years ago and LED lighting is still not mature decision. Can anyone argue?
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2017
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  25. Maximus XXIV

    Maximus XXIV New User

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    I bet it will come with time and experience. It sounds like color temperature and coverage is an issue with these installations. I wonder if they were designed by an expert or the local Park and Rec guy.
     
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  26. mmk

    mmk Hall of Fame

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    The indoor courts at my club were changed from halogen to LED. Both use reflectors, so the light is directed towards the ceiling, not directly onto the court. The big advantage of the LEDs from a player's perspective is no more transformer noise. I'm personally not fond of the color temperature, but I seem to be the only one. I replaced all the ceiling lamps at home with LED, quite happy there.
     
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  27. Traffic

    Traffic Semi-Pro

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    I actually work with LED technology for roadway lighting. But we recently had a ball field retrofitted with LEDs. The problem is glare. LEDs are small chips of intensely bright light. In order to get the lumen output, you have anywhere from 80 to 200 chips. Each chip generates a lot of heat (LEDs convert electric energy to photons of light and heat is one of the byproducts).

    There are only a few quality chip manufacturers such as CREE. But anyone can make a light fixture in their garage.

    4000k is sort of the accepted standard color temperature for efficiency and visibility. However, 3000k is a little easier on the eyes (think glare).

    Glare is the biggest downside. Imagine driving a road and it's wet and there is headlight approaching with either Xenon HID lights or worse, actual LED lights. Now imagine an LED streetlight mounted 25-30' height. A lot of people would have a hard time discerning the two from far away.

    One thing you don't want to do is look directly at an LED light source. But seems like you inevitably have to when hitting or receiving a lob or serving.

    Part of why LED is ok for streetlight use is the ability to provide better distribution pattern. HPS fixtures would dump 90% of its light in a pattern 70* from horizontal. So basically a spot light. LEDs were able to aim their chips to provide a more uniform pattern. So a lot of areas that had very low light (0.0fc to 0.2fc) were now 0.1 to 0.4fc with the maximum being 1.5fc. There is less harsh bright and dark spots. However, the lumen output is far lower than HPS. It's a different type of visibility.

    But in a ball field, the light levels are probably in the 6fc range throughout the whole court making it a pseudo daylight condition. I think that's going to be tough to do solely with LED lights. But like computers, LED technology is doubling its performance every other year...
     
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  28. Booger

    Booger Hall of Fame

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    I looked into it and the technology isn't quite there yet. Cost is enormous and a proper install would be complex for an application as critical as a tennis court. Meanwhile, metal halide is still cheap and easy. String up about 10kw worth for a few thousand bucks and you're done.
     
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  29. Maximus XXIV

    Maximus XXIV New User

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    Why would an LED light have more glare than another kind of light given the same color temperature?

    LEDs have revolutionized bike lights in the last 5 years or so due to efficiency and it would be nice to see ongoing costs at city parks drop.
     
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  30. dje31

    dje31 Professional

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    Excellent input from someone on the inside, Paul Cho.

    I'm guessing that what probably needs to happen to exploit the energy efficiency of LEDs with a usable brightness is to diffuse / reflect / otherwise redirect the lumens, in order to properly illuminate the intended space without blinding the users or creating unwanted glare.

    This is likely the future, once they work out the bugs.
     
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  31. Naijatennis

    Naijatennis New User

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    My experience playing under this lights is that maybe glare is slightly worse than with the old metal halide lights but not so much as to make play difficult. I think that the mistake most people make is to install LED lights which are not specifically designed for use on a tennis court. If you just put up some standard LED floodlights you will definitely get poor light uniformity. Uniformity is the key to being able to see the ball well, not the brightness.

    Installation was not hard at all. I have no engineering experience but put them up at 12m with the help of an electrician and the light plan from the suppliers. They can be retrofit to any current system.

    The LED's had another major advantage for us in Nigeria as the electricity goes on and off so often with Metal Halide bulbs we used to have whole evenings with only 10 minutes play as we had to wait for bulbs to cool down / heat up. The instant on and ability to dim the LED's is fantastic. This can make major electricity savings as well. We went from 2 courts with 12 x 2000w bulbs to 2 courts covered by 4 x 1700w LED's which can be switched on and off as soon as the courts is needed.

     
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