Lendl and the Career Golden Masters

#1
If any of the Big 4 wins the Masters Tournaments that they are still missing, I'm sure there is going to be a big deal made about how they have completed the 'Career Golden Masters'. I've only found out recently that Lendl has won Masters tournaments in all 9 slots. In fact, he managed to win at 11 different venues. He is missing Paris, but that doesn't really count since it only started in 1989 and he won whatever the equivalent was before that.

So why hasn't this achievement been hyped up at all, especially in comparison to the presumed acclaim that would greet such an achievement by a current player?
 
#2
Because it happened before the men's tour was unified under ATP in 1990. Funnily enough, the last masters equivalent Lendl won was also the last one of the pre-unification era, 1989 Stockholm, and it was also the one that completed the 'golden 9' for him, but since that wasn't under the current system, nobody up there cares.
 

Mainad

Bionic Poster
#3
If any of the Big 4 wins the Masters Tournaments that they are still missing, I'm sure there is going to be a big deal made about how they have completed the 'Career Golden Masters'. I've only found out recently that Lendl has won Masters tournaments in all 9 slots. In fact, he managed to win at 11 different venues. He is missing Paris, but that doesn't really count since it only started in 1989 and he won whatever the equivalent was before that.


The Paris-Bercy tournament began in 1968, not 1989. It didn't acquire 'Masters' status until 1990.

So why hasn't this achievement been hyped up at all, especially in comparison to the presumed acclaim that would greet such an achievement by a current player?
The ATP only recognises the 9 tournaments as Masters from 1990 onwards. Prior to that they were just different tournaments with varying degrees of status attached to them.
 

Zoolander

Hall of Fame
#4
Lendl was a machine. Think he made 19 GS finals in a strong era, only 1 less than Djoko has managed.

Would love to see how he would have done if the courts were as homogenised back then as they are now.
 

Gizo

Hall of Fame
#5
Amongst retired players, Lendl definitely has the best 'non-slam' achievements in the open era for sure.

His body of work at the biggest indoor events in Europe, North America, Sydney and Tokyo, hard court events in North America, clay court events in Europe and North America and at Queen's on grass was just amazing.
 
#6
Ivan was a monster and one of the less appreciated players out there. He also never benefited from any weak era; he always had to play against an incredible field vs both all-court geniuses (like Mac and Jimbo, later Edberg and Boom-Boom) and a slew of surface specialists on every surface he played on (grass being the most obvious example).
 

Gizo

Hall of Fame
#7
Some of his insane achievements at the non-slam events (or at least encompassing them) include:

- Winning 5 titles in 5 consecutive weeks during the fall of 1981, in Madrid and Barcelona an outdoor clay and then Vienna, Basel and Cologne on indoor hard/carpet. All of those tournaments apart from Cologne had best of 5 set finals.

- His perfect 40-0 record in official indoor tournaments and 15 titles overall in 1982, capped off with him crushing Connors and McEnroe back to back to win the YEC.

- Winning 3 titles in 3 consecutive weeks on 3 different surfaces in March-April 1985; Fort Myers on outdoor hard courts, Monte-Carlo on clay and the WCT Finals in Dallas on indoor carpet.

- Winning the 1986 YEC without dropping a set or being taken to a tiebreaker, blitzing through Edberg, Gomez, Noah, Wilander and Becker. That is the only time that a player has won a 5 match, RR-format YEC without dropping a set.

- His 5 different years with winning percentages between 91-93%; in 1982 (92%), 1985 (92%), 1986 (93%), 1987 (91%) and 1989 (92%).

- His overall 35-16 head to head against the best players from the next generation; Sampras (3-5), Agassi (6-2), Courier (4-0), Chang (5-2), Stich (6-1), Ivanisevic (5-1), Muster (4-1), Bruguera (1-1), Krajicek (1-2) and Rafter (0-1). He had victories over Sampras on carpet in 1993, over Ivanisevic on carpet in 1992, over Muster and Bruguera on clay in 1992 and over Stich on clay in Germany in 1993.

- The fact that he won 2 titles apiece at Rome (1986 and 1988), Monte-Carlo (1985 and 1988), Hamburg (1987 and 1989) and Barcelona (1980 and 1981), meaning that he was a multiple champion at each of the 5 biggest clay court tournaments available to him. On top of that he won the biggest green clay tournament available to him in Forest Hills 3 times in 1982, 1985 and 1989.
 
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#8
Ivan was a monster and one of the less appreciated players out there. He also never benefited from any weak era; he always had to play against an incredible field vs both all-court geniuses (like Mac and Jimbo, later Edberg and Boom-Boom) and a slew of surface specialists on every surface he played on (grass being the most obvious example).
People didn't seem to warm to his game or personality, which has meant his achievements are underrated.
 

thrust

Hall of Fame
#9
If any of the Big 4 wins the Masters Tournaments that they are still missing, I'm sure there is going to be a big deal made about how they have completed the 'Career Golden Masters'. I've only found out recently that Lendl has won Masters tournaments in all 9 slots. In fact, he managed to win at 11 different venues. He is missing Paris, but that doesn't really count since it only started in 1989 and he won whatever the equivalent was before that.

So why hasn't this achievement been hyped up at all, especially in comparison to the presumed acclaim that would greet such an achievement by a current player?
Because he is Ivan Lendl, who unfortunately, never had the popularity or hype of: Connors, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg etc.. Coming for a Communist Country, at the beginning, didn't help either.
 
#10
People didn't seem to warm to his game or personality, which has meant his achievements are underrated.
Because he is Ivan Lendl, who unfortunately, never had the popularity or hype of: Connors, McEnroe, Becker, Edberg etc.. Coming for a Communist Country, at the beginning, didn't help either.
People finally got to appreciate his understated cool and dry sense of humour... long after he retired :(

And, he probably did have the most successful (arguably tied with Mac; jury, both figuratively and literally, still out on Boris) post-tennis career of all these guys, what with transforming Andy Murray from a boring, winless pusher to a boring, multiple Grand-Slam-winning pusher. Not bad for a bland communist curmudgeon, I'd say ;)
 
#15
Isn’t the big diferente in Masters after 1990 that top players now mostly play them all, and so the average ranking of who you meet in these tournaments has gone up?
 
#18
If any of the Big 4 wins the Masters Tournaments that they are still missing, I'm sure there is going to be a big deal made about how they have completed the 'Career Golden Masters'. I've only found out recently that Lendl has won Masters tournaments in all 9 slots. In fact, he managed to win at 11 different venues. He is missing Paris, but that doesn't really count since it only started in 1989 and he won whatever the equivalent was before that.

So why hasn't this achievement been hyped up at all, especially in comparison to the presumed acclaim that would greet such an achievement by a current player?
Lendl is a great but this is not a record simply for in the 80s there was not Master 1000 or Super 9.
Some tournaments were "Super Series" but they were > 9.
Wikipedia in this case deceives (subject Master 1000).:mad::mad::mad:
 
#19
Lendl is a great but this is not a record simply for in the 80s there was not Master 1000 or Super 9.
Some tournaments were "Super Series" but they were > 9.
Wikipedia in this case deceives (subject Master 1000).:mad::mad::mad:
Yeah, I was carried away with the Wiki page, which portrayed events since 1970 as neat groups of 9 Masters.
 
#20
In Wikipedia you shall *not* trust, this should be one of the tenets of Internet users. ;) The first edition of the Paris-Bercy tournament was held in 1986, with Becker winning over Casal in the final. Don't trust the rubbish Wikipedia posts about the previous editions of the Paris Open (a much smaller event), the Bercy arena didn't even exist back then (it was finished in 1984, so Wikipedia saying that a tennis tournament was played there in the 70's is a big LOL). I don't know where the Paris Open was held before Bercy, to be honest (couldn't find out).
 

Gizo

Hall of Fame
#21
In Wikipedia you shall *not* trust, this should be one of the tenets of Internet users. ;) The first edition of the Paris-Bercy tournament was held in 1986, with Becker winning over Casal in the final. Don't trust the rubbish Wikipedia posts about the previous editions of the Paris Open (a much smaller event), the Bercy arena didn't even exist back then (it was finished in 1984, so Wikipedia saying that a tennis tournament was played there in the 70's is a big LOL). I don't know where the Paris Open was held before Bercy, to be honest (couldn't find out).
Agreed wikipedia is only as reliable as the knowledge of the people who have written the articles and provided the information in the first. I've lost count of the number of errors that I've noticed there over the years.

Here's what the official tournament website says anyway:

'The Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy (POPB) was inaugurated in February 1984 by cyclists from theParis Six-Day event. It hosted an exhibition tennis match in 1985, and then the first ever Open deParis, from 27 October – 2 November 1986'

My main memory of the the first ever Paris-Bercy tournament, was McEnroe's rant at Jeremy Shales after his QF defeat to Sergio Casal, "You’re never going to work on a court again you understand me? You’re pathetic! You're the worst umpire I've ever seen in my life, you're never going to work another match". Mac was fined $3,000, taking him over the $7,500 limit and triggering a 42 day suspension. Nastase, Lendl, Connors and later Courier all had major run-ins with Shales as well.

Lendl himself only played there twice in 1990, when he was beaten Jonas Svensson (who of course also famously beat him in Paris at RG in 1988), and 1993 when he was beaten by David Wheaton.
 

Gizo

Hall of Fame
#22
Another impressive Lendl stat, is that he entered 319 'sanctioned' tournaments during his career (i.e. ones that are officially recognised), and won 94 of them, a 29.5% success rate.

And his surface by surface win-loss percentages were all impressive:

Carpet: 265-53 (83.3%)
Clay: 327-76 (81.1%)
Grass: 81-27 (75.0%) - If you include his results at Beckenham (a grass court tune-up event with more than 32 players in the draw), then it's 94-28 (77.1%)
Hard: 395-86 (82.1%)
 
#23
Carpet: 265-53 (83.3%)
Clay: 327-76 (81.1%)
Grass: 81-27 (75.0%) - If you include his results at Beckenham (a grass court tune-up event with more than 32 players in the draw), then it's 94-28 (77.1%)
Hard: 395-86 (82.1%)
Interesting. Thanks. I would have thought clay was his best surface.

But he managed to transform himself to be a great indoor carpet and hard court player as well.

(Not quite so much on grass.)
 
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Mainad

Bionic Poster
#24
In Wikipedia you shall *not* trust, this should be one of the tenets of Internet users. ;) The first edition of the Paris-Bercy tournament was held in 1986, with Becker winning over Casal in the final. Don't trust the rubbish Wikipedia posts about the previous editions of the Paris Open (a much smaller event), the Bercy arena didn't even exist back then (it was finished in 1984, so Wikipedia saying that a tennis tournament was played there in the 70's is a big LOL). I don't know where the Paris Open was held before Bercy, to be honest (couldn't find out).
Okay, fair comment. The ATP website does indeed only record stats on the tournament from 1986.
 

NoMercy

Hall of Fame
#25
In Wikipedia you shall *not* trust, this should be one of the tenets of Internet users. ;) The first edition of the Paris-Bercy tournament was held in 1986, with Becker winning over Casal in the final. Don't trust the rubbish Wikipedia posts about the previous editions of the Paris Open (a much smaller event), the Bercy arena didn't even exist back then (it was finished in 1984, so Wikipedia saying that a tennis tournament was played there in the 70's is a big LOL). I don't know where the Paris Open was held before Bercy, to be honest (couldn't find out).
At the Stade de Cubertin.
It was the French Indoors, not the Paris Open.
It was the same tournament started in 1895, last edition 1982.
And yeah, the Paris-Bercy one is a totally different tournament. On the walls of the Bercy Arena (former Palais Omnisport de Paris-Bercy) there are all the former champions, starting with Becker 1986.
 
#26
At the Stade de Cubertin.
It was the French Indoors, not the Paris Open.
It was the same tournament started in 1895, last edition 1982.
And yeah, the Paris-Bercy one is a totally different tournament. On the walls of the Bercy Arena (former Palais Omnisport de Paris-Bercy) there are all the former champions, starting with Becker 1986.
Oh yes, Coubertin, you're right--totally forgot about that. Thanks! :)
 
#27
Ivan was a monster and one of the less appreciated players out there. He also never benefited from any weak era; he always had to play against an incredible field vs both all-court geniuses (like Mac and Jimbo, later Edberg and Boom-Boom) and a slew of surface specialists on every surface he played on (grass being the most obvious example).
I second that. As a matter of fact, based on achievements, he is the best - or at least the most successful - player of the 1980's. And, as you rightly point out, in an incredibly competitive era. He saw the end of Borg's dominance and the beginning of Sampras', and had to fight incredibly talented players in playing conditions a lot less uniform than now. I, for one, am absolutely convinced that he would have won Wimbledon if the playing conditions had been what they are today.

He wasn't very popular at the time. A very private and guarded player, whose sense of humor was largely misunderstood (English was a second language after all). The closest thing to an Eastern Bloc James Bond villain. I wonder if people attacking his personality forget that he was raised in a totalitarian regime, where people had to hide their true feelings as a matter of survival.
 
#28
Yes one cannot make direct comparisons between top tournaments pre-1990 and post 1990. But there were significant achievements pre-1990 nonetheless. I have yet to see a decent argument explaining to me how Becker's win at the Paris Indoor in 1989 (pre-Masters 1000 years) was inferior to his win there in 1992 (post the beginning of the Masters 1000). The fields seemed similar in depth. So if Becker achieved similar achievments - pre-1990 to post 1990 then it seems reasonable to assume that other players had comparable Tournament win achievements pre-1990.
 
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