Leonard Cohen dead

Bartelby

Talk Tennis Guru
#9
The first three albums were great, but after that success was more infrequent. 67 to 71 is, however, a long period of originality for popular music.
 
J

JRAJ1988

Guest
#10
82 and was active this year also, not bad run in music and if you look at his chart performances he charted higher since 2012 than any time else in his career.
 
#17
There is no God in Heaven
And there is no Hell below
So says the great professor
Of all there is to know
But I've had the invitation
That a sinner can't refuse
And it's almost like salvation
It's almost like the blues
 
#18
He was Canadian though (not sure if he lived in the States), so being alive in Canada would probably have preferable to death.

(Apologies if I misunderstood your point)
That link to "The New Yorker" piece stated he spent his last few years in LA. The NY Times obituary states he died at his home there.
 
#20
He was Canadian though (not sure if he lived in the States), so being alive in Canada would probably have preferable to death.

(Apologies if I misunderstood your point)
Sorry. My point was that too often when someone famous dies--no matter what the circumstance, we call it a great shame or tragedy or loss.

After a long, fruitful, influential life maybe death is not bad. Maybe death brings peace, or freedom from physical pain, or release from some kind of suffering.

When I die, I do not want my kids and family to be sad and mourn. I want them to have a party, drink lots of beer, tell lots of sappy, sentimental stories about me, toast my joys and accomplishments (few as they are), and say he loved travelling, listening to great music, and playing tennis. He enjoyed living, and he did a lot of it.

It is sad when someone talented and joyful dies young and suffering, before they get to enjoy the beauty of the world. It is sad when someone is merely alive, but cannot enjoy or even remember the persons and things that made life a wonderful gift. Those are true tragedies.
 
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