Let's say you are a top pro

mike danny

Bionic Poster
You achieved everything you wanted to achieve. Everything from now on is icing on the cake. But you can still break some more records. Would you still becwilling to handle the stress ahead of big matches or would you rather spend your last years on tour playing for fun?
 

Mick

Legend
I am not a pro but I don't like to lose tennis matches. I think the top pros would hate to lose tennis matches more than i do. I don't think it's possible to play for fun if you're a pro. For most top pros, they would quit the sport once they come to the realization that they can no longer compete at the high level needed to win titles.
 

Backspin1183

G.O.A.T.
If I were a pro and had a lot of success, I am not sure how I'd keep myself motivated once almost every goal is achieved. I'd either retire by 30 or play only half the season. I wouldn't want to keep on playing once I'm 33 or more. Time to focus on family and other things in life without having to train hard every week.
 

Earnest One

Semi-Pro
These are difficult questions.

I have never understood the psychology of the top guys (Federer is a bit different as he seems to enjoy playing tennis).

But the TOTAL competitive mindset is disturbing. Tom Watson has it. Some people can't switch it off--Jordan, for example. Simply pathological. He needs a serious chill pill. Others have the strain etched in their faces forever.

I have never understood--or, more precisely, IDENTIFIED with--this all-out competitive mindset. It seems wildly unhealthy.

Borg let it go. He seems sane and does not appear to have regrets. McEnroe flips out every time someone mentions the FO to him. Indeed, he flips out every time he remembers the 1984 FO (and worse, he is wrong about being up a break and then losing it).

Odd people. Worse--for every one of them, there are 10,000 that failed to do much but who walk around all f...ked up, all twisted out of shape.
 
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Pcdozer413

Rookie
These are difficult questions.

I have never understood the psychology of the top guys (Federer is a bit different as he seems to enjoy playing tennis).

But the TOTAL competitive mindset is disturbing. Tom Watson has it. Some people can't switch it off--Jordan, for example. Simply pathological. He needs a serious chill pill. Others have the strain etched in their faces forever.

I have never understood--or, more precisely, IDENTIFIED with--this all-out competitive mindset. It seems wildly unhealthy.

Borg let it go. He seems sane and does not appear to have regrets. McEnroe flips out every time someone mentions the FO to him. Indeed, he flips out every time he remembers the 1984 FO (and worse, he is wrong about being up a break and then losing it).

Odd people. Worse--for every one of them, there are 10,000 that failed to do much but who walk around all f...ked up, all twisted our of shape.
An "all-out competitive mindset" is a way of life. As Rafa Nadal has said - what's the point of doing something if not giving all of yourself...
 
You achieved everything you wanted to achieve. Everything from now on is icing on the cake. But you can still break some more records. Would you still becwilling to handle the stress ahead of big matches or would you rather spend your last years on tour playing for fun?
Neither. I'd retire and switch to golf.
 

Earnest One

Semi-Pro
An "all-out competitive mindset" is a way of life. As Rafa Nadal has said - what's the point of doing something if not giving all of yourself...
Like taking a dump?!! (excuse the crude language).

Take this to its logical extreme and it becomes inane, stupid, banal, ridiculous--clearly not applicable.

"I am competitive in everything I do." Really? If so, these people are clinically insane (and that IS possible).

"Hurry up and relax" ("Earnest One" circa 1985) That's MY response. Compete for that... Or compete for not looking like a competitive a-hole... Or... Or...
 
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mike danny

Bionic Poster
If I were a pro and had a lot of success, I am not sure how I'd keep myself motivated once almost every goal is achieved. I'd either retire by 30 or play only half the season. I wouldn't want to keep on playing once I'm 33 or more. Time to focus on family and other things in life without having to train hard every week.
In my humble opinion if you enjoy something a lot then you will always find motivation to do that thing over and over again.

Enjoyment can be connected to motivation in many cases.
 

Pcdozer413

Rookie
Like taking a dump?!! (excuse the crude language).

Take this to its logical extreme and it becomes inane, stupid, banal, ridiculous--clearly not applicable.

"I am competitive in everything I do." Really? If so, these people are clinically insane (and that IS possible).

"Hurry up and relax" ("Earnest One" circa 1985) That's MY response. Compete for that... Or compete for not looking like a competitive a-hole... Or... Or...
Respect other people's ways. You don't have a say on how others should live their lives.
 

jg153040

G.O.A.T.
You achieved everything you wanted to achieve. Everything from now on is icing on the cake. But you can still break some more records. Would you still becwilling to handle the stress ahead of big matches or would you rather spend your last years on tour playing for fun?
What do you mean? Isn't breaking records and playing under pressure fun?

I guess there are two kinds of fun. Short term vs long term. Short term you get it right away, but it doesn't taste that well. Long term you suffer first a bit more, but in the end it tastes so much better.

For example, losing weight is that type of fun. Sure it's stressful at first, you have to work hard, can't eat some of tasty foods, but in the end you have more fun, because you have health, confidence, you look better and so on.

My point is that playing competitive matches is also fun, just different kind of fun. Like the difference between watching movies and eating versus doing fitness and eating healthy.

I guess the difference is the price you pay and the results you get.

In short term fun (TV+food), you get the prize right away, but you pay a lot more later in terms of being sick and fat.

In long term fun (fitness), you have to pay the price in advance, but that price is smaller and the prize is bigger.

Short term fun = smaller prize, right away.
Long term fun = larger prize, but you have to wait.

This is the main reason why most people struggle with motivation.
 

Pcdozer413

Rookie
What do you mean? Isn't breaking records and playing under pressure fun?

I guess there are two kinds of fun. Short term vs long term. Short term you get it right away, but it doesn't taste that well. Long term you suffer first a bit more, but in the end it tastes so much better.

For example, losing weight is that type of fun. Sure it's stressful at first, you have to work hard, can't eat some of tasty foods, but in the end you have more fun, because you have health, confidence, you look better and so on.

My point is that playing competitive matches is also fun, just different kind of fun. Like the difference between watching movies and eating versus doing fitness and eating healthy.

I guess the difference is the price you pay and the results you get.

In short term fun (TV+food), you get the prize right away, but you pay a lot more later in terms of being sick and fat.

In long term fun (fitness), you have to pay the price in advance, but that price is smaller and the prize is bigger.

Short term fun = smaller prize, right away.
Long term fun = larger prize, but you have to wait.

This is the main reason why most people struggle with motivation.
Very well said! The tougher the challenge, the sweeter the result.
 

G A S

Hall of Fame
You achieved everything you wanted to achieve. Everything from now on is icing on the cake. But you can still break some more records. Would you still becwilling to handle the stress ahead of big matches or would you rather spend your last years on tour playing for fun?
I don't really understand where this stress would come from, if you are already successfull, it seems that stress would become counterintuitive, hence not applicable.
 

Russeljones

G.O.A.T.
You achieved everything you wanted to achieve. Everything from now on is icing on the cake. But you can still break some more records. Would you still becwilling to handle the stress ahead of big matches or would you rather spend your last years on tour playing for fun?
I think to play along, one would have to make the following presumption - achieving everything means having a champion's DNA. I don't believe a champion's DNA allows a champion to coast along.

If I were a top pro, I would quit when I found I couldn't achieve the level I was accustomed to.
 

Earnest One

Semi-Pro
Respect other people's ways. You don't have a say on how others should live their lives.
Nor do I want a say, either. I am simply commenting on the idiotic (to me) propaganda system.

People claim they are competitive in everything, but this is obviously absurd.
 
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