Life expectancy of a frame?

junior74

G.O.A.T.
Hi guys!
Just recently I read that one member replaced his frame after 20-25 stringings. Sounded very quick to me. Is that really the life expectancy of a frame?

How about the grommets - does change of grommets influence the performance?
 

TennisManiac

Hall of Fame
If you play 2 to 3 times a week and string under the manufacturer's recommended max tension and change out the grommets every couple of months your racket should last you at least 3 to 5 years with no problem what so ever.
 

struggle

Legend
Yes and I know guys still playing POG's that they bought in the 80's.

So, replace them when you wish or when they break.
 

ricardo

Hall of Fame
You probably read one of my posts. My frames break at around 25 string jobs. I hit hard and I string tight.

However, I did leave a rather detailed post regarding how racket manufactures' take into account the basic idea that the average rec player restrings once a month and that their product cycle is on average 2 years. (See the math? 24 string jobs for most people would be 2 years... time for an upgrade!)

Changing the grommets and bumpers can have some effect, especially if you're having problems with frames collapsing. It can easily add a bit more life to your frame. Same goes with if you're a heavy scraper on the top of the frame. Ideally you don't want to have graphite exposed as frames are A LOT easier to break once graphite fibers are starting to show. (Pressure cracks and the ilk start to show up in worn down spots, usually.) With that being said, I usually change grommets at around restring 10 depending on how they look, then again on 20ish. Biggest problem for me is, is that most wear on my frames is at 3 & 9 from low volleys and hitting low slices. When I used to use the prestige mid my frames lasted WAY longer and I have to imagine that it had to do with the cap grommets, and probably because I wasn't breaking as frequently.

-Fuji
I hit hard

This is what breaks your racket.

Even if you string everyday/tight, if you hit like my granny,
you will never break a racket, especially the rackets with extreme open patterns (i.e Wilson Steam 99S/105S). These are built like tanks and daily stringing will not break them.
 

coolschreiber

Hall of Fame
Unless you are very harsh with your frames, they should last you forever. Didn't Del Potro play with just 3 or 4 frames forever. Imagine what his frames went through, string jobs every other day and not to mention how flat and hard he hits.
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
^^ Sounds right to me. The only issue I've had with my current racquets - Slazenger V98 - is the grommets are very worn down and there are no replacements. I just bought three new racquets and I'll only be playing on clay from now on (and I don't hit hard or abuse my racquets in any way) so I expect them to last a decade... we'll see.
 

Lukhas

Legend
Unless you are very harsh with your frames, they should last you forever. Didn't Del Potro play with just 3 or 4 frames forever. Imagine what his frames went through, string jobs every other day and not to mention how flat and hard he hits.
Except that throughout time the feel of the frames changes. Generally, they become much more flexible. Which is one of the reasons why Del Potro couldn't even switch to an identical spec'd copy of his original K-Factor paintjobs made by Wilson down to the paint. So yeah, he kept going with his racquets, but it doesn't mean that they still feel anywhere near new.
It has been mentioned in a thread that it's one of the reasons pros switch racquets often: when they get used to the feel of their current frames, switching when it starts to become necessary. Considering he only had 3 racquets left (the others internally broke down or cracked), it's not an exactly ideal situation for a pro player.
 

donquijote

G.O.A.T.
Don't fix it, if it is not broken. If you ask the manufacturers, they'd say something according to their profit planning. Hard to scientifically prove either way.
 

jonestim

Hall of Fame
^^ Sounds right to me. The only issue I've had with my current racquets - Slazenger V98 - is the grommets are very worn down and there are no replacements. I just bought three new racquets and I'll only be playing on clay from now on (and I don't hit hard or abuse my racquets in any way) so I expect them to last a decade... we'll see.
Didn't the V98 use the same mold as the Dunlop M3.0? Check with TW. Grommets are available for that.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Dunlop_Biomimetic_M30_Grommet/descpageDUNLOP-DM30G.html
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
Both JM Del Potro and James Blake, I venture to guess, hit harder than Fuji and their frames last longer.

Maybe 99S is a very fragile racquet, or Fuji has not told us of his racquet-smashing habit?
 

navigator

Hall of Fame
Didn't the V98 use the same mold as the Dunlop M3.0? Check with TW. Grommets are available for that.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/Dunlop_Biomimetic_M30_Grommet/descpageDUNLOP-DM30G.html
Thanks for this, but... it's too late! (Also, I've ground through the grommets and into the graphite on my Slazengers... it's only a matter of time at this point.) I bought three Wilson Blade 98 BLXs - very similar specs to the V98 but a tad heavier (only $110 each, too) - with an extra set of grommets for each (I didn't even bother to test hit them). So, I suspect they'll last a good long while. I'm not a racquetaholic - I just want something durable and middle-of-the-road.
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
However, I did leave a rather detailed post regarding how racket manufactures' take into account the basic idea that the average rec player restrings once a month and that their product cycle is on average 2 years.
The average rec player re-strings once per month? Ha, I think half the players at my club don't know you can replace the strings.
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
The average rec player re-strings once per month? Ha, I think half the players at my club don't know you can replace the strings.
One of the players at my club borrowed a racket of mine last night because his was feeling a bit dead. He thought it was much better. When asked he told me he was on original strings and the racket is 22 years old! :)
 

ultradr

Legend
I know a material engineer who replaces his racquet every 6 months.
He claims 6 month use of a frame would generate enough micro-cracks inside to lose large amount of its physical properties.

About myself, I have used same frames (switching between 3 identical ones) for a good 10 years.
I'm looking to replace them with new frames (and struggling to find a new frame though).
 
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WINZOWAR

Rookie
The racquet industry hates me. The last seven racquets I've picked up were made in either the 80s or 90s. I really want to get some wood rackets too.
 

vandre

Hall of Fame
The average rec player re-strings once per month? Ha, I think half the players at my club don't know you can replace the strings.
yes, it's quite possible i'm more abnormal than average but i typically restring 2 racquets each a season for myself and one each season for the wife. neither of us are big string breakers though so your mileage may vary...

...to the op, my old college racquet that i played a couple of seasons with in the 90s is still here and the only reason i bailed on it when i started playing again was the weight (too heavy for this old man :().
 

time_fly

Hall of Fame
I know a material engineer who replaces his racquet every 6 months.
He claims 6 month use of a frame would generate enough micro-cracks inside to lose large amount of its physical properties.
Tell him to try hitting more shots on the strings instead. :p
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
I know a material engineer who replaces his racquet every 6 months.
He claims 6 month use of a frame would generate enough micro-cracks inside to lose large amount of its physical properties.

About myself, I have used same frames (switching between 3 identical ones) for a good 10 years.
I'm looking to replace them with new frames (and struggling to find a new frame though).
So presumably if you have an aeroplane, car, motorcycle or bicycle made of carbon fibre it is scrap in six months or less if you hit bumps to hard?
 

Fuji

Legend
The average rec player re-strings once per month? Ha, I think half the players at my club don't know you can replace the strings.
Just relaying what one of my reps told me. According to their "data" they assume that on average rec players restring once a month. Take it as you will! :razz:

-Fuji
 

Fuji

Legend
Both JM Del Potro and James Blake, I venture to guess, hit harder than Fuji and their frames last longer.

Maybe 99S is a very fragile racquet, or Fuji has not told us of his racquet-smashing habit?
I found the 99S to be frail, but don't forget I was stringing as tight as James Blake for most of the time. I never actually broke a 99S. Abused one fairly badly, but I learned quickly that they didn't take it well and stopped.

(Plus these guys don't frame nearly as often as I do, I'm sure. Framing on hardish shots does take a toll on frames.)

-Fuji
 

Fuji

Legend
Well.
Wilson is laughing all the way to the bank and your pocket is crying, unless of course you get free replacements.
It's all good though. I paid next to nothing for them. I void warranty on most frames from stringing above rec tension.

-Fuji
 

Booger

Hall of Fame
Anyone have access to an industrial xray machine? I definitely have frames with 30+ string jobs on them.
 

scotus

G.O.A.T.
You probably read one of my posts. My frames break at around 25 string jobs. I hit hard and I string tight.

However, I did leave a rather detailed post regarding how racket manufactures' take into account the basic idea that the average rec player restrings once a month and that their product cycle is on average 2 years. (See the math? 24 string jobs for most people would be 2 years... time for an upgrade!)

Changing the grommets and bumpers can have some effect, especially if you're having problems with frames collapsing. It can easily add a bit more life to your frame. Same goes with if you're a heavy scraper on the top of the frame. Ideally you don't want to have graphite exposed as frames are A LOT easier to break once graphite fibers are starting to show. (Pressure cracks and the ilk start to show up in worn down spots, usually.) With that being said, I usually change grommets at around restring 10 depending on how they look, then again on 20ish. Biggest problem for me is, is that most wear on my frames is at 3 & 9 from low volleys and hitting low slices. When I used to use the prestige mid my frames lasted WAY longer and I have to imagine that it had to do with the cap grommets, and probably because I wasn't breaking as frequently.

-Fuji
You might want to look into Babolats. Their racquets are on 3-year cycles.

Must mean higher quality. Can you imagine being able to string each racquet 36 times before having to replace it?
 

jxs653

Semi-Pro
The more I use the racquet I better I like the feel. Some people say the feel goes dead but I say it feels more at home. For me life of the racquet end when there are physical symtoms such as cracks, warpage, etc.
 

gchen

New User
Last year I bought a prince original graphite from a college player. It was from 1986? Used it and it played fine. Have head prestige intelligence and liquidmetal racquets which are close to 10 years old. I restring the liquidmetal about once every 1-2 weeks, plays fine, maybe a bit more flexible than when I started.
 
I just switched after five years of using my prestige pros which were starting to rattle and become uncomfortable. I alternated with four sticks and probably string them every six weeks. I play 4 times a week and hit with moderate pace at 4.5. My thoughts are you will know when to replace and there is no rule as each player us different. My son is a 5.0 player big hitter plays from the baseline and he replaces about every two years, my wife us a 4.0 and will replace her racquets when she gets tired of the color whenever that is.
 

goldenset

New User
i still play with my pro staff 85 from the mid-80s. The ones made in taiwan because they have better feel and slightly more flex than made in china. i string them at the max -60 lbx. i still have all of them that i stocked up with. the times i was breaking them in the 80's was mainly one piece stringing. odd but it's true. once i converted to 2 piece stringing, they don't break anymore.

they all broke by the throat around the 7 o-clock area when i did one piece stringing.

the problem and why i got the blx six.one 90 is because today's pro staff 85 grommets don't fit correctly. they seem to be slightly shorter and i have to cut them up into pieces (3, maybe 4) to make them fit the grommet holes of the 80's version.

i made sure i stocked up on the blx six.one 90 grommets. :p
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
I string for a former D1 player who uses the Wison kFactor 6.1 16 X 18. He gets about 4 sets out of PrinceSyn 16 with Duraflex and he strings at 62 pounds. Other than needing new grommets, his racquets are still very much playable and he has no intention of buying new.

I posted a few years ago about a female pro I strung for at a WTA event here. She used the Babolat APD strung with RPM 16. She broke two sets of strings a day. Her frames, and I've not seen this before or since, had been strung so many times that the paint was worn off at 5 & 7 o'clock where the string crosses the frame while restringing.

I kinda figured after seeing these two that a) racquets can be strung 100s or 1000s of times and still play and b) if they can't wear their racquets out I'm certainly safe.
 
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Fuji

Legend
I string for a former D1 player who uses the Wison kFactor 6.1 16 X 18. He gets about 4 sets out of PrinceSyn 16 with Duraflex and he strings at 62 pounds. Other than needing new grommets, his racquets are still very much playable and he has no intention of buying new.

I posted a few years ago about a female pro I strung for at a WTA event here. She used the Babolat APD strung with RPM 16. She broke two sets of strings a day. Her frames, and I've not seen this before or since, had been strung so many times that the paint was worn off at 5 & 7 o'clock where the string crosses the frame while restringing.

I kinda figured after seeing these two that a) racquets can be strung 100s or 1000s of times and still play and b) if they can't wear their racquets out I'm certainly safe.
Haha that is awesome! (It's obviously prostock magic!!! ;) )

Man, the 6.1 line is a tank though. Those frames will carry you through hell and high water. If I ever want to play tennis in a post apocalyptic wasteland the 6.1 would be my obvious weapon of choice.

-Fuji
 

junior74

G.O.A.T.
You probably read one of my posts. My frames break at around 25 string jobs. I hit hard and I string tight.

However, I did leave a rather detailed post regarding how racket manufactures' take into account the basic idea that the average rec player restrings once a month and that their product cycle is on average 2 years. (See the math? 24 string jobs for most people would be 2 years... time for an upgrade!)

Changing the grommets and bumpers can have some effect, especially if you're having problems with frames collapsing. It can easily add a bit more life to your frame. Same goes with if you're a heavy scraper on the top of the frame. Ideally you don't want to have graphite exposed as frames are A LOT easier to break once graphite fibers are starting to show. (Pressure cracks and the ilk start to show up in worn down spots, usually.) With that being said, I usually change grommets at around restring 10 depending on how they look, then again on 20ish. Biggest problem for me is, is that most wear on my frames is at 3 & 9 from low volleys and hitting low slices. When I used to use the prestige mid my frames lasted WAY longer and I have to imagine that it had to do with the cap grommets, and probably because I wasn't breaking as frequently.

-Fuji
If you play 2 to 3 times a week and string under the manufacturer's recommended max tension and change out the grommets every couple of months your racket should last you at least 3 to 5 years with no problem what so ever.
Yes and I know guys still playing POG's that they bought in the 80's.

So, replace them when you wish or when they break.

Thanks for the response :)
I'll get new grommets for my racquets!
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I've always wondered if all of the lead that the pros add increases frame longevity. I don't think that lead tape makes the frame any stronger but you have a collision between more mass - kind of like an 18-wheeler hitting a Corolla - and that might result in less frame damage.
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
My vct97 are really smooth into their 3rd year now. Maybe they have softened a bit, or maybe my body has got used to them but they are still really accurate.
 

ultradr

Legend
Tell him to try hitting more shots on the strings instead. :p
I'll tell him next time. He is pretty good player though.


So presumably if you have an aeroplane, car, motorcycle or bicycle made of carbon fibre it is scrap in six months or less if you hit bumps to hard?
I guess it depends on the function.

If you have money and presumably you can feel it, why not get a new one.
By the way, he tend to find cheapest one he likes and replace them every 6 month.
 

GBplayer

Hall of Fame
I guess it depends on the function.

If you have money and presumably you can feel it, why not get a new one.
By the way, he tend to find cheapest one he likes and replace them every 6 month.[/QUOTE]

Maybe that is why the modern Airbus and Boeing keep crashing?

If you have the money fine, even then once I find something I like I am loathed to change.
 

dnj30

Semi-Pro
I think most of us really really want to believe that a frame wears out much sooner than it actually does so we can justify buying new rackets that we don't actually need.
 

movdqa

Talk Tennis Guru
I think most of us really really want to believe that a frame wears out much sooner than it actually does so we can justify buying new rackets that we don't actually need.
I have three Head Pros - they're made from extruded aluminum and I got them in the 1980s. You can take these things and whack them as hard as you want to on a tennis court and they might deform a little but they will still be playable.

Of course they're 65 square inches and weigh about 14 ounces.

I think that I can get ten years out of my current set of frames.
 

vandre

Hall of Fame
I think most of us really really want to believe that a frame wears out much sooner than it actually does so we can justify buying new rackets that we don't actually need.
i think you've got a nice nugget of truth here. i might go on and prove it because my current crop of yonexes (rqis 1 tours and xl tours) are going to have to tide me over until my kids are all out of the house!
 

dnj30

Semi-Pro
i think you've got a nice nugget of truth here. i might go on and prove it because my current crop of yonexes (rqis 1 tours and xl tours) are going to have to tide me over until my kids are all out of the house!
I hear ya. You may have to start buying new sticks "under the radar".
 

jazzpanther

New User
On average, I change racquets about every five years. I use 2-3 of the same racquets and restring them as needed. I read an article about metal fatigue that occurs in racquets as a result of restringing and player's hitting habits; something about the graphite separating and the racquets eventually feeling dead. Not sure about rec payers restringing so frequently especially those using polyester strings. We all know players who play with the same racquet and strings for years and the idea of changing either one never occurs to them.
 

CopolyX

Hall of Fame
I will not buy a frame used or new, if grommets kits are not available or hard to get(Plus $$$). Also no matter what, if i scoop up a used frame...the very first thing I do is a total inspection ...strings are cut, grommet come off, really inspect the hoop and if it is a pass>>>new grommets go on..no matter what...know whats under your hood & start fresh...
 

n8dawg6

Legend
it depends on how well im playing. if its match play and i feel my performance is sub-par, i tend to smash the racquet to pieces within 5-10 hrs of play
 

jxs653

Semi-Pro
To me the life of racquet ends when it is physically marred (like cracks, fractures). In fact I prefer the comfy, flexed feel of old racquets and the more it is used the better it gets.
 
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