Linear Gripper vs Rotational Gripper?

topanlego

Semi-Pro
TopanLego: That is a very effective way of doing it. It's not the way the manual tells you to do it. Your way is much better than the recommended way.

Have you ever had the frame brackets slip during stringing with your StringPal? I found them very awkward to tighten so I bought two 1/2 nylon spacers so that the knobs would come down past the sides of the steel swivel bar. I am a big strong guy and I tighten the knobs as tight as possible. A few pulls from the end of the mains the racquets slips out of the brackets. Very nerve-racking. One of the brackets had worked it's way loose. I do not understand how it could have possibly slipped. It did the same thing on two more racquets. The only thing I could guess was that by pulling the brackets very tight up against the frame-the last one I tightened was not laying totally flat. After many pulls back and forth it settled down a hair and then slipped because it was no longer completely tight. I don't know that that was the case-just my best guess. I don't have the stringer around to experiment with it and my student has strung another racquet since I worked through the first one with her.

I am very mechanically inclined and have been stringing for almost 25 years. I strung on a Klippermate, Prince Neos 1000, Ektelon model DE, Gamma 6500 ELS and my stringer Stringway standing machine. So it's not like I haven't had any experience.
I've never had the post slip. The only modification I've done to the racquet supports is I've added some used overgrip to the support plates so that the racquet doesn't slip when doing the crosses.
 
I'm considering getting my first stringing machine and dropweight is the absolute maximum type I can afford.

In the "Mansewerz's Guide to Buying Stringing Machines" thread, he says the Silent Partner Hip Hop "falls short of the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus in the gripper territory because it utilizes a rotational gripper" while the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus uses a linear gripper.

Yet, just a few threads down, the same OP says "a linear gripper can cause more damage to a string because a flaw in the design can cause inadequate/too much gripping, or the gripper might be adjusted to too tight/loose of a setting. The rotational requires more string to tension, but is often gentler on the string. The kinks in the string that occur with a rotational gripper are very minor and are typically gone after tensioning."

So, the only reason why the rotational gripper falls short of the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus / Eagnas Challenger I / Mutual Power Hercules 690 / etc. linear grippers is the fact that the rotational grippers require more string?

Tell me more about this "design flaw" in all linear grippers that can cause more damage to a string than a rotational gripper. What exactly makes the gripper on the Progression 602FC worse than the gripper on the cheaper Alpha Pioneer DC Plus or the much cheaper Eagnas Hyper 60?

Both a dropweight rotational and a dropweight linear are "constant pull" (instead of "lockout"), right?

Also, how do you know you have your gripper or clamps adjusted correctly to not damage string?
 

RobS

Rookie
I'm considering getting my first stringing machine and dropweight is the absolute maximum type I can afford.

In the "Mansewerz's Guide to Buying Stringing Machines" thread, he says the Silent Partner Hip Hop "falls short of the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus in the gripper territory because it utilizes a rotational gripper" while the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus uses a linear gripper.

Yet, just a few threads down, the same OP says "a linear gripper can cause more damage to a string because a flaw in the design can cause inadequate/too much gripping, or the gripper might be adjusted to too tight/loose of a setting. The rotational requires more string to tension, but is often gentler on the string. The kinks in the string that occur with a rotational gripper are very minor and are typically gone after tensioning."

So, the only reason why the rotational gripper falls short of the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus / Eagnas Challenger I / Mutual Power Hercules 690 / etc. linear grippers is the fact that the rotational grippers require more string?

Tell me more about this "design flaw" in all linear grippers that can cause more damage to a string than a rotational gripper. What exactly makes the gripper on the Progression 602FC worse than the gripper on the cheaper Alpha Pioneer DC Plus or the much cheaper Eagnas Hyper 60?

Both a dropweight rotational and a dropweight linear are "constant pull" (instead of "lockout"), right?

Also, how do you know you have your gripper or clamps adjusted correctly to not damage string?
Both drop weight machines are constant pull. Rotation grippers are pretty easy on strings. Linear grippers wont damage strings either as long as they're properly adjusted to not close too tight. Many if not most rotational gripper machines require a little more string but that depends on the particular machine and the location of the gripper relative to the frame. I wouldn't factor that into a decision. Shopping for a drop weight, I'd consider quality of construction, quality of clamps and ease of use. I'm not familiar with Silent Partner machines but Alpha's are pretty well constructed for their price point. I would choose a linear gripper for ease of use in all cases except for on a drop weight. My personal experience is that the rotational gripper, on a Gamma drop 602FC example, is more efficient than the linear gripper on the Alpha. The Alpha is really a combination linear and rotational gripper. It's a linear device that holds the string but that device rotates around the ratchet.
 

esgee48

G.O.A.T.
Both types of gripping mechanisms work. If one type had a mechanical advantage over the other, it would predominate in the marketplace. AFAIK, they both work as intended. I have used both types and there is no difference in how well or badly they hold the string. Just clean them periodically and they will not fail you. Me, I clean every 10 frames or end of month. My memory is such that I find it easier to just clean the clamps and gripper at EOM.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
In the "Mansewerz's Guide to Buying Stringing Machines" thread, he says the Silent Partner Hip Hop "falls short of the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus in the gripper territory because it utilizes a rotational gripper" while the Alpha Pioneer DC Plus uses a linear gripper.
To grip the string on a Alpha Pioneer DC+ you first may have to wrap the string around the drum then through the gripper. The drum would take a lot of pressure off the linear gripper plates because of drum friction. On a true rotational gripper you wrap the string around the drum but the drum has 2 sections. The top portion of the gripper is spring loaded, and as the string goes around the drum the string holds down the top spring loaded section. As the string passes through the two portions of the drum the string is held. Both methods work fine, but the string needed to reach the gripper won’t be much difference either way.
 
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AceyMan

Semi-Pro
The best drop weight is a Stringway.

And it's got an "automatic" linear gripper that defies description. And you don't have to level the bar. It's just genius.

The fixed clamp models aren't super cheap, but my deluxe'd out ML120 was around $950USD. And nothing else yields a more consistent stringbed. It's a serious tool.

/Acey
 

struggle

Legend
The alpha pioneer dc plus is the best bang for the $, IMO. The base clamps are superior to others in the range.

Stringway is like Saab. Has its' merits, it seems, but costs more for for less, pending your approach to weirdness vs.
what everyone else is doing.
 

struggle

Legend
To grip the string on a Alpha Pioneer DC+ you first may have to wrap the string around the drum then through the gripper. The drum would take a lot of pressure off the linear gripper plates because of drum friction. On a true rotational gripper you wrap the string around the drum but the drum has 2 sections. The top portion of the gripper is spring loaded, and as the string goes around the drum the string holds down the top spring loaded section. As the string passes through the two portions of the drum the string is held. Both methods work fine, but the string needed to reach the gripper won’t be much difference either way.
The alpha has a linear gripper. no more reason to wrap it than on whatever your machine of the week is, also with a linear gripper.
 

Herb

Semi-Pro
The only real drawback of a rotational gripper on a drop weight machine, is that you have to have the grip strength to hold the gripper in place at tension when you make your adjustments to the weight. I have tried to teach several people over the years how to use a drop weight, and several were unable to hold the gripper (mostly women and kids)
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
The only real drawback of a rotational gripper on a drop weight machine, is that you have to have the grip strength to hold the gripper in place at tension when you make your adjustments to the weight. I have tried to teach several people over the years how to use a drop weight, and several were unable to hold the gripper (mostly women and kids)
Make sure the gripper is past horizontal and pull on the string after going around the drum and through the gripper. If you leave the gripper level or not turned far enough to get to level then it‘s all grip strength to grip the string. As soon as you lower the weight it put more and more pressure on the gripper and there no need for the person to hold the gripper until you want to lift the weight again, then you need grip strength. I’ve found the stiffer the string the easier it is to use a DW.
 

PrinceYonex

Rookie
The best drop weight is a Stringway.

And it's got an "automatic" linear gripper that defies description. And you don't have to level the bar. It's just genius.

The fixed clamp models aren't super cheap, but my deluxe'd out ML120 was around $950USD. And nothing else yields a more consistent stringbed. It's a serious tool.

/Acey
I've been using a Stringway for the past six months or so, and the two things I love about it are (1) the auto-drop weight that doesn't require leveling, and (2) the clamshell gripper. The gripper is so easy to use, especially for the Yusuki starting method that requires putting two strings through the gripper at once. It's so much easier and more effective for this purpose than the rotational gripper on the Gamma X-2 that I used to use.
 

struggle

Legend
The real question at this point is probably whether or not the Gamma stringers are worth the additional $90-$140 over the Alpha in that price range. I suspect that’s a “no.”
even though I’m a gamma user, in this price range alpha has better base clamps.
 
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brownbearfalling

Hall of Fame
I’ve never used a linear gripper on a drop weight but I have experience with the rest.

I think the gamma gripper is the best because of one feature, the counter rotational adjustment. The gripper can be rotated counter to how the string pulls the gripper. This is useful for adjusting the gripper to get the parallel weight location. Other grippers don’t do this as well. It is harder to fine tune the gripper. Second best is string way. It’s easy to use, has les pressure points and easy to fine tune. I realize that the klipper mate gripper holds the string well but I find it more laborious than the other types.

Linear for other types of machines is a no brainer.
 

Winners or Errors

Hall of Fame
I’ve never used a linear gripper on a drop weight but I have experience with the rest.

I think the gamma gripper is the best because of one feature, the counter rotational adjustment. The gripper can be rotated counter to how the string pulls the gripper. This is useful for adjusting the gripper to get the parallel weight location. Other grippers don’t do this as well. It is harder to fine tune the gripper. Second best is string way. It’s easy to use, has les pressure points and easy to fine tune. I realize that the klipper mate gripper holds the string well but I find it more laborious than the other types.

Linear for other types of machines is a no brainer.
Huh? The Pioneer DC+ has a clutch that serves the function you describe on the Gamma. I'm not following you. I agree that the Klippermate way is much harder on the string if you don't figure out how to get the bar level the first time, though.
 
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