Lisa Raymond

boredone3456

G.O.A.T.
Lisa Raymond announced her retirement following her loss in the mixed doubles at the US Open. This thread probably won't get any responses but in a tour where doubles players pop in and out she was a doubles specialist who actually succeeded for a long time.

Her achievements
6 majors in women's doubles (winning the career slam)
5 majors in mixed doubles (only the Aussie stopped her from a career slam in mixed)
4 Tour finals titles
79 overall doubles titles
A record of 853-331 in doubles (79% winning percentage)
Bronze Medal in mixed doubles in 2012

Her and Stosur were arguably a top 5 doubles team of the 2000s overall right up there with the Williams, Huber/Black, Suarez/Pascal with the other spot debatable.

I enjoyed watching her career, she was someone like Davenport who just loved the game....I'll miss her name in draws
 

PDJ

G.O.A.T.
I read that she retired.
A player, much like Cara Black, that I wd always look for in the doubles results section.
I also quite liked the coldness between her and Navratilova when they teamed up briefly- the interviews at the time contained a lot of eye rolling!
She was part of the Davenport crowd that seemed a fun clique at the time.
Thank you for reminding us what a great career she had.
 

PDJ

G.O.A.T.
Ps I was at Wimbledon when she either beat Venus or lost a very close match. I can't recall which. I want to say won but I really don't remember aside from I'm sure there was a tiebreak.
 

Frankc

Professional
Great post - magnificent achievements - saw her in college as she s&v her way through all comers, for years - brilliant athlete and technique. As Martina commented, if Ms. Raymond played in an earlier era, her pro career results would be different. Still, at her height and style, she was very successful at singles and and wonderfully successful in doubles throughout.
Interesting, s&v with a Prince Mid throughout her college years - that's true skill and talent...
 

boredone3456

G.O.A.T.
I read that she retired.
A player, much like Cara Black, that I wd always look for in the doubles results section.
I also quite liked the coldness between her and Navratilova when they teamed up briefly- the interviews at the time contained a lot of eye rolling!
She was part of the Davenport crowd that seemed a fun clique at the time.
Thank you for reminding us what a great career she had.
Her and Navratilova personality wise were a horrible match. Martina just wanted to win Lisa was not as well, power hungry, as Martina was. Lisa sadly never had a major stead partnership. Her and stubbs had amazing results, although her and Stosur were stronger I think.

Probably the most suprising partner she had was Liezel Huber...although that was strictly for the olympics because I couldn't see them getting along at all.
 
Raymond was thought to be very promising in singles in 95 I recall, but she never really broke out as a singles player. Was for sure one of the doubles greats of the last 20 years though. I wonder if she has any shot at the HOF? Probably not, but great career nonetheless.
 

boredone3456

G.O.A.T.
Raymond was thought to be very promising in singles in 95 I recall, but she never really broke out as a singles player. Was for sure one of the doubles greats of the last 20 years though. I wonder if she has any shot at the HOF? Probably not, but great career nonetheless.
She's getting in the hall of fame. 11 majors in doubles, over 70 doubles titles, number 1 in the world, over 800 matches won....if she doesn't get in that would be really pathetic on the part of the hall.
 

boredone3456

G.O.A.T.
To me all of the following should get into the hall at some point

Virginia Ruano Pascaul
Paola Suarez
Liezel Huber (I don't like her personality much but I won't deny her accomplishments)
Cara Black
Lisa Raymond
Ai Sugiyama
Rennae Stubbs

Even someone like Daniela Hantuchova who won all 4 mixed doubles majors at some point deserves some credit for that.

However doubles now-a-days is almost ridiculed so maybe none of them will get in. But many of them had better careers in doubles then some current hall members had in singles so they should get in to
 
She's getting in the hall of fame. 11 majors in doubles, over 70 doubles titles, number 1 in the world, over 800 matches won....if she doesn't get in that would be really pathetic on the part of the hall.
I dont think mixed is given the same recognition as same gender doubles, similar to how doubles is not given the same recognition as singles. Looking at the past inductees it seems doubles specialists need 14+ slams, often in a legendary parternship.

Eltingh & Haarhuis did not get in for instance.
 

sovertennis

Professional
Loved watching her play, and was fortunate enough to see her (live) on a number of occasions. Admired her lunch pail sensibility.
 

Moose Malloy

G.O.A.T.
this is the first match I think of when I hear Lisa Raymond. check out her comments at the end,
WIMBLEDON, England — Through three sets, through 118 minutes of tennis created by her versatile backhand and sometimes deadly forehand, with foresight and sometimes with sudden tentativeness, Lisa Raymond discovered something yesterday. She belongs.

Raymond, the 19-year-old from Wayne who was playing Wimbledon as only her second pro tournament, lost to No. 7 seed Jennifer Capriati, 4-6, 6-3, 8-6, in a women's fourth-round match. The tennis was often terrific, and Raymond left the impression that even as the loser, she would soon be the better player.

After all, Raymond is just a month past winning the NCAA singles title, and she was ranked only 65th in the world. Yet it was Raymond's dazzling backhand, hit in all sorts of baffling forms, that was the starring shot of the day: She sliced with it, chipped with it, pounded it suddenly hard and deep. That backhand is like some fancy food processor, and Raymond just has to decide what speed to put it on to dice up some opponent.
Most of Capriati's big shots were big service returns when Raymond began missing her first serves. Raymond was leaving her second serves sitting up high and fat and begging for Capriati to smash them back, which the younger, bigger player did.

If it was Raymond who had more strokes, who played points with a purpose, who dictated the play, it was also Raymond who made more mistakes. The crowd, shoehorned into Court 14, which seats about 1,860 people, was loudly backing Raymond. Many of these people had come in at 6 a.m. because eventually British favorite Andrew Foster was scheduled to play Pete Sampras there. But they were also revved up for any good tennis, and Raymond gave them more of it.

Raymond was never afraid to use a drop shot. She used it in the 10th game of the third set, when Capriati was leading by 5-4 and serving for the match. With Raymond at 15-40, both players were deep on the baseline, so Raymond took the chance, swung under the ball and plopped a drop shot just over the net. The crowd went crazy. Capriati swung at the ground in anger, then shook her head and got over the disappointment.

In the 13th game of the third set, Capriati went on the attack. She hammered away at Raymond's second serve. Then, on her fourth break point, Capriati hit a forehand that scampered past Raymond's racket like a mouse chasing cheese. Serving for the match, Capriati didn't miss a first serve and didn't lose a point. That's a pro, too.

"Experience might have had something to do with the crucial situations," Raymond said. "That's when she played her best, and I think that's when I was at my weakest."

"I definitely think Lisa can be in the top 10," Capriati said. "She has the stuff for it, and she's a player to watch out for."

Raymond didn't disagree. "I have the potential to be a top-10 player," she said, "if not a top-five player. When that happens - that's the key question."
 

boredone3456

G.O.A.T.
It's ironic that she had that much confidence and yet it never actually happened. She got into the top 15 but never had the moment in the top 10. Her game was mechanically gifted but she never got the big match experience to build up that mental aspect.

I bet a lot of people will read those comments at the end and label her as cocky, which in some ways they do sound cocky to be honest, but her career transformed her into a quiet almost stately veteran who never really demanded respect yet got it anyway. I'm glad she had the career she did, although I do wish she had done more in singles
 
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