Living in cities - Which is best ?

My cities

Detroit - yikes
Chicago - like 8 months of hellish weather
Atlanta - bad fit for me on every level
Portland - nice city but rains 9 months
Tucson - hell hole
Phoenix - very nice but too damn HOT

Vegas - current city - won’t comment
Next city - earths crust !!!
Isn't Vegas hotter than Phoenix?
 
So great public facilities and low taxes: Sounds either like heaven or pie in the sky?
Well low taxing nations can actually stimulate more economic activity and creativity resulting in more taxation collected. High taxing nations either go broke or the talented people leave resulting in higher unemployment and less tax collected.
 
I've lived in many different major cities of USA. The factor i've come to prefer is how dense vs sprawling the city is. Not that its an exact science, but in my experience it relates to how quickly and efficeneintly get around to where you need to go. After undergrad i thought about moving to Atlanta, GA or Portland, OR and ultimately chose portland because i can walk or bike most places or rely on mass transit. Although I'm not counting out Atlanta in the future because I love the tennis there.
 
I would prefer not to live in a city.
Have some land, space, fresh air and water. Seaside and mountains close.
Not any further than 1,5h from an international airport.
I live in Norway, and feel I picked the golden ticket when I was born, so lucky.
And what about Norway’s climate? No much sunlight, isn’t it?
 
Norway falls within the "we have too much oil and too few people, so it doesn't matter" category.

Denmark is more complex, but they are happy (with high taxes).

:cool:
Pretty good assessment. My only reservation is the definition of what makes one happy. There is quite a different lifestyle with say people living in Australia and U.S. and Denmark. Lot of people live in big houses and households and own more then one car compared to Denmark where accommodation tends to be a lot more frugal and this is just an observation on one aspect.
Would like to hear from someone here who has lived in both countries for a comparison,
 
I wonder which, if any, cities have fairly easy access to tennis courts. Courts not too costly.
I hear Atlanta has too many tennis players, hard to get a court.
 
Pretty good assessment. My only reservation is the definition of what makes one happy. There is quite a different lifestyle with say people living in Australia and U.S. and Denmark. Lot of people live in big houses and households and own more then one car compared to Denmark where accommodation tends to be a lot more frugal and this is just an observation on one aspect.
Would like to hear from someone here who has lived in both countries for a comparison,
There are some that might argue that ease of obtaining guns, a big car, and a big house is all they need.

Others may care less about material things and care more about experiential things. (juxtoposition intended)

Others may want a tightly controlled society with low crime, low freedom.
 
There are some that might argue that ease of obtaining guns, a big car, and a big house is all they need.

Others may care less about material things and care more about experiential things. (juxtoposition intended)

Others may want a tightly controlled society with low crime, low freedom.
Well not everybody who is successful/unsuccessful (Take your pick) and buys a big house and cars wants a gun.

Conversely those who live in a controlled society may have to endure crimes committed against them by aggressive agencies in their society and state if they have other views.

And there are those who are less materialistic and more experiential don't want to take responsibility for their well being and independence. ( but one can't generalise)

The thing is that researchers can skew things to suit their agenda. Look how biased universities and the media can be and also governments in their legislative power to influence society.

At the end of the day if you strip things right back most people are happy if they are free, can be healthy, be teated fairly and have the opportunity to be what they dream to be.
Depending on your point of view some would argue that earning reward for effort is important.
A big thing with all these studies is that size of population and density as mentioned here is a big factor. For example New Zealand, Norway and even Australia are small populations compared to China, India, USA and even Japan and the UK. Even Taiwan, which is smaller than Tasmania has a population bigger than Australia.
People in Sydney complain that it is becoming too populated and with it brings problems of congestion and expensive house prices but some won't move to say Adelaide hecause of family and lack of economic opportunities.
There have ideas of developing regional towns again and connecting them with fast trains but this is usually talk during election time.
 
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I heard that Denmark is organic country because everything is organic. If so, I should move there and I don’t like poison stuff eg hormone added to the meat. The most important is Denmark ban any dangerous medications such as cymbalta. Unlike aust govt have no clue how dangerous cymbalta is and putting people at risk.
 
I wonder which, if any, cities have fairly easy access to tennis courts. Courts not too costly.
I hear Atlanta has too many tennis players, hard to get a court.
That's good to hear that Atlanta has lots of tennis players. Either they must be doing something right and/or they need to build more courts.
 
https://www.cnbc.com/2018/01/23/us-news-world-report-the-top-10-best-countries-in-the-world.html
According to the US News & World Report, the top ten countries overall in the world are:
1. Switzerland
2. Canada
3. Germany
4. UK
5. Japan
6. Sweden
7. Australia
8. USA
9. France
10. Netherlands

American bias showing a bit there though LOL.
8. United States
Also in the top 10 best countries for: cultural influence, entrepreneurship, power, most forward-looking, most influential, education.

LOL. No..
 
8. United States
Also in the top 10 best countries for: cultural influence, entrepreneurship, power, most forward-looking, most influential, education.

LOL. No..
If the U.S. Is not 8th then where do you think they rate. Second thing of interest is what would being "forward looking", constitute because it can mean different things to different people.
As for the education system, depending on your point of view, that could mean different things. Lot of teachers I talk to complain about poor student behaviour and parenting skills and school curriculums moving away from classical education systems of Math, English and Science and instead focusing on the humanities and politics.
Does anyone have a view on this. Would like to hear a variety of viewpoints. Cheers
 
Are there any of you who have made the move from Australia to NZ or the other way round? NZ sure looks beautiful. What about moving from New York to San Diego or the other way round?
 
Norway falls within the "we have too much oil and too few people, so it doesn't matter" category.

Denmark is more complex, but they are happy (with high taxes).

:cool:
Venezuela, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Russia, Iraq all have much more oil per capita. Norway ranks #33.
There must be something different about them.. maybe better education and social services that results in better human development? and yes they collect tax to do all that.
 
Well not everybody who is successful/unsuccessful (Take your pick) and buys a big house and cars wants a gun.

Conversely those who live in a controlled society may have to endure crimes committed against them by aggressive agencies in their society and state if they have other views.

And there are those who are less materialistic and more experiential don't want to take responsibility for their well being and independence. ( but one can't generalise)

The thing is that researchers can skew things to suit their agenda. Look how biased universities and the media can be and also governments in their legislative power to influence society.

At the end of the day if you strip things right back most people are happy if they are free, can be healthy, be teated fairly and have the opportunity to be what they dream to be.
Depending on your point of view some would argue that earning reward for effort is important.
A big thing with all these studies is that size of population and density as mentioned here is a big factor. For example New Zealand, Norway and even Australia are small populations compared to China, India, USA and even Japan and the UK. Even Taiwan, which is smaller than Tasmania has a population bigger than Australia.
People in Sydney complain that it is becoming too populated and with it brings problems of congestion and expensive house prices but some won't move to say Adelaide hecause of family and lack of economic opportunities.
There have ideas of developing regional towns again and connecting them with fast trains but this is usually talk during election time.
My post was mostly in jest to make the point that what happiness is can vary depending on the person.

e.g.
Some value career sucess and money above family and vice versa.
 
Oregon- great people
Vegas- Great Weather
Michigan- if you love lakes and bitter Cold
Atlanta- if you love the night life
Phoenix- if you love to bake to death for 6 months
Chicago- if you love the BIG CITY
 
Google Wikipedia petroleum reserves by country.
We are not talking reserves that is why I asked.

We are talking real production, and as far as I know Norway produces more oil per 1000 people than any of the aforementioned.

Of course, you are also correct that there are more important factors to wealth than only natural resources, but underestimating the natural factors for wealth is not very objective.

War, political system, number of population, and many more are all contributing factors to the way the wealth is kept and distributed.

:cool:
 

jhick

Professional
I don't have experience of living in many different parts of the world but I think that finding the perfect place for many ends up missing the point. Doing a quick google search on the happiest places in the world, Norway hits #1. Looking at the happiest state in the U.S....it's South Dakota. I've happily spent my life in MN and I'm not a winter sport guy. But I do deeply value proximity to family and a variety of weather. I would very much be willing to believe a lot of my satisfaction in a place so many struggle with at times is cultural to an extent. Outside of a Norway native, it doesn't seem to come up as a destination to seek out for permanent residence.

My brother couldn't stand the winters here (who could blame him?). He's lived in TX, HI, GA, NC and Northern Italy. You could say, he's still searching for that place that fits. Everyone differs in what satisfies them, but I can't help but wonder...is finding the perfect place to live somewhat like finding the perfect racquet? How long do we keep looking for perfect before we find ways to see perfect in what we already have?
Fellow life long Minnesotan here too. Winters are harsh...I always tell people visiting that Jan/Feb are the worst, outside of that winter is not bad. Four seasons are nice, fall is beautiful with the scenery and my favorite time of the year. My wife doesn't do well in the heat (she grew up on Lake Superior), but that said, we've talked about moving south after my kids are grown. My wife likes Tennessee, but I guess the insects and bugs are terrible there. So I guess that's one good thing about the MN winters, they clean out all of that.
 

sureshs

Bionic Poster
Conversely those who live in a controlled society may have to endure crimes committed against them by aggressive agencies in their society and state if they have other views.
That actually does not change with gun ownership, only that now it is not only the agencies that can bully them, but their neighbors too.
 
That actually does not change with gun ownership, only that now it is not only the agencies that can bully them, but their neighbors too.
Well I think you have edited posts and taken things out out context here. The poster was making an observation between 3 types of living and made a comparison between a place where there was free gun ownership hence high crime on one extreme and a totallatarian system with high control and low crime rate. The point made in response to this is that these totallatarian systems aren't quite low in crime when you factor in the 45 million people killed in 4 years by one of the leaders of those countries and 6 million from another extreme type.
 
My credo is that if you choose a medium or small city, choose one with at least one college or university. Always means there are better restaurants, usually means more music, theatre, other cultural opportunities, and generally a more interesting population.
 
My credo is that if you choose a medium or small city, choose one with at least one college or university. Always means there are better restaurants, usually means more music, theatre, other cultural opportunities, and generally a more interesting population.
I like a large town or small city with a huge city an hour away. Beaches and mountains are a bonus.
 
The other day I was listening to a podcast on cities and why people choose/need/forced to live where they do and they were talking about human interest and connectivity and relating it to employment opportunities, population growth and housing prices. Both Sydney and Melbourne are rapidly growing in that 5 million range with Brisbane just over 2 million, Perth just under 2 million. Adelaide at 1.3 with Hobart at 220 thou and Canberra around that figure as well . The two largest cities in population are larger than LA and around that Toronto Canada size with NY at 8 million. Chinese cities as an example their 10th biggest city is just under 8 million people.
My question is what makes a good city for you to live in. I can tell you now that expensive houses and congestion doesn't cut it in. A nice climate, comfortable lifestyle and freedom do. Your thoughts on this topic if you like.
Didn't read all comments but lived or been long enough to answer your question with my take,
Sydney -best city to live with 8 figure income. If you're pay exceeds $1, 000,000 year you can have some of the best location on earth with the benefit of 5 mil population next door.
If you earn 6 figures $200,000 below this is a bad city to live.
Melbourne - they have put all their eggs into the CBD and throttled their mid to outter suburbs. If you can afford anywhere 15 - 20 mins from CBD it's great city otherwise your taxes are going elsewhere. Also good if your into AFL. But need to be on public tram route. Crap weather. Need mid 6 figure salary
Adelaide - It's like Melbourne but on a budget. Had nearly everything Melbourne had but cheaper. This is best city for educated service workers. Unfortunately it's losing its lower to middle income sector with closures of manufacturing and no resource section spending.
Brisbane - its weird city mainly because there are areas north and south that are premium. Topography really stuff this city up. I find it strange because of layout and the population spread along the sea board.
Perth - mining and mining support. Nothing else to say this city flutated on resource sector and FIFO. Boom and bust. Kind of another country in outlook. I rarely been there but from what I heard because $$$ in boom can be good
Tassdi - only visited. Lovely place with economic and environmental constraints. It's one of those places where if you can get good $ and like nature and hells cold is good. I like Tassi but it's hard to get good paying work.
Darwin - Don't like it To bloody humid and cyclones come through too often. I can think of many small towns that are better. I work for Darwin based company and the turn over of middle to upper managements is high. Weather good for 8-9 month but hell otherwise. Can think of large towns north of Capricorn that are better
ACT - meh its government If you're not government then better places to be.
So
Depends on what you do and income level. Generally speaking the big cities are only ok if you earn top $, if you work in resources or support your location will be predetermined to a degree. Aust smaller cities area generally better for middle income workers. Big cities make middle income look average If your uneducated work in small cities can be hard to find so maybe bigger cities way to go. In my book if your middle or lower management or income Adelaide and larger non capitals are better.
 
Has anyone moved from USA or UK and Australia and moved to a country say like Hungary where u get more bang for your buck buying a house is Buda or Pest
I moved from the US to Moscow for a couple of years back in 2002. Life is much cheaper there, but you pay the price in other ways. Living there was just one big hassle due to the crushing bureaucracy and widespread corruption. It was the same in St. Petersburg when I was a student, but with the added annoyance of undrinkable tap water and loads of mosquitoes in the summer.

As Hungary becomes more undemocratic and its government gets restructured into a vertical power structure, I wouldn't be surprised to see it becoming more and more like Russia.
 
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Didn't read all comments but lived or been long enough to answer your question with my take,
Sydney -best city to live with 8 figure income. If you're pay exceeds $1, 000,000 year you can have some of the best location on earth with the benefit of 5 mil population next door.
If you earn 6 figures $200,000 below this is a bad city to live.
Melbourne - they have put all their eggs into the CBD and throttled their mid to outter suburbs. If you can afford anywhere 15 - 20 mins from CBD it's great city otherwise your taxes are going elsewhere. Also good if your into AFL. But need to be on public tram route. Crap weather. Need mid 6 figure salary
Adelaide - It's like Melbourne but on a budget. Had nearly everything Melbourne had but cheaper. This is best city for educated service workers. Unfortunately it's losing its lower to middle income sector with closures of manufacturing and no resource section spending.
Brisbane - its weird city mainly because there are areas north and south that are premium. Topography really stuff this city up. I find it strange because of layout and the population spread along the sea board.
Perth - mining and mining support. Nothing else to say this city flutated on resource sector and FIFO. Boom and bust. Kind of another country in outlook. I rarely been there but from what I heard because $$$ in boom can be good
Tassdi - only visited. Lovely place with economic and environmental constraints. It's one of those places where if you can get good $ and like nature and hells cold is good. I like Tassi but it's hard to get good paying work.
Darwin - Don't like it To bloody humid and cyclones come through too often. I can think of many small towns that are better. I work for Darwin based company and the turn over of middle to upper managements is high. Weather good for 8-9 month but hell otherwise. Can think of large towns north of Capricorn that are better
ACT - meh its government If you're not government then better places to be.
So
Depends on what you do and income level. Generally speaking the big cities are only ok if you earn top $, if you work in resources or support your location will be predetermined to a degree. Aust smaller cities area generally better for middle income workers. Big cities make middle income look average If your uneducated work in small cities can be hard to find so maybe bigger cities way to go. In my book if your middle or lower management or income Adelaide and larger non capitals are better.
Thx for taking the time to express your take, enjoyed the read!
 
I moved from the US to Moscow for a couple of years back in 2002. Life is much cheaper there, but you pay the price in other ways. Living there was just one big hassle due to the crushing bureaucracy and widespread corruption. It was the same in St. Petersburg when I was a student, but with the added annoyance of undrinkable tap water and loads of mosquitoes in the summer.

As Hungary becomes more undemocratic and its government gets restructured into a vertical power structure, I wouldn't be surprised to see it becoming more and more like Russia.
Thx for your sentiments, interesting read.
 
Thx for your sentiments, interesting read.
Another thing you have to remember is that, if you move to a place with a lower cost of living, then you'll most likely see your salary drop. For example, when I moved to Moscow, I wasn't earning what the average American earned at the time; I was being paid what an average Russian earned back in those days.

Even though I got more bang for my buck, I had fewer bucks. So, I wasn't much better off financially speaking than if I had a similar job in my home town.
 
Another thing you have to remember is that, if you move to a place with a lower cost of living, then you'll most likely see your salary drop. For example, when I moved to Moscow, I wasn't earning what the average American earned at the time; I was being paid what an average Russian earned back in those days.

Even though I got more bang for my buck, I had fewer bucks. So, I wasn't much better off financially speaking than if I had a similar job in my home town.
Yes that is a risk people may face moving to a lower cost area, Sydney has higher wages than Adelaide for instance however I need to assess things right. Biggest cost difference between say Adelaide and Sydney would be the cost of buying a house, Sydney's median over 1 million , Adelaide I'm the mid to high 400's.
 
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