lockout machine vs constant pull/ drop weight

VaporBlast

New User
When using a lock out machine, would you string at lower tensions than when using the other two types of machine??
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
tension on any machine is just a number...find your number on that machine and stick with it

I've strung on a drop weight, a lockout,and now an electric. In my experience, while the drop weight may have exerted the right tension, the resultant string bed was softer than the other two because of the clamps, both floating. The machines were a Gamma drop weight with floating clamps, a Prince Neos, and a Prince Neos with a Wise tension head

Here is how my tension went from drop weight to lockout to electric:
65 on a drop weight -> 58 on a lockout -> 55 on an electric

The feel of the string beds were:
softest (drop weight) -> firmer (lock out) -> firmest (electric)


NOTE: This is not a sleight to any type of machine
 

VaporBlast

New User
Should there be a tension reference with each manchine? I have a babolat sensor dual so was wondering if there is one with them and what that is compared to other machines.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Depending on how you string on any machine you could get different DTs even on the same machine at the same tension setting.
 

TennisCJC

Legend
Here is how my tension went from drop weight to lockout to electric:
65 on a drop weight -> 58 on a lockout -> 55 on an electric

The feel of the string beds were:
softest (drop weight) -> firmer (lock out) -> firmest (electric)

NOTE: This is not a sleight to any type of machine
My knowledge is the exact opposite. If the drop weight is true constant pull, then the drop weight should result in a firmer string bed. Some say lock out tension should be 5% higher than true constant pull to make up for the lack of constant pull. My machine is drop weight constant pull and my experience is it results in tighter string beds when compared to a friends lock-out crank type machine.

Some electrics are constant pull and some are not. But, an electric constant pull machine should give similar results to a drop weight constant pull.
 

paulfisher

New User
A constant pull machine will result in a firmer string bed due to the continued stretching of the string until the string clamps are set. The amount of time between the initial reaching of the reference tension and the time when the clamps are set affect the resultant tension. A typical rule of thumb is that a lock out machine should be set 5 to 10% higher than the reference tension on a continuous pull machine.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
tension on any machine is just a number...find your number on that machine and stick with it

I've strung on a drop weight, a lockout,and now an electric. In my experience, while the drop weight may have exerted the right tension, the resultant string bed was softer than the other two because of the clamps, both floating. The machines were a Gamma drop weight with floating clamps, a Prince Neos, and a Prince Neos with a Wise tension head

Here is how my tension went from drop weight to lockout to electric:
65 on a drop weight -> 58 on a lockout -> 55 on an electric

The feel of the string beds were:
softest (drop weight) -> firmer (lock out) -> firmest (electric)


NOTE: This is not a sleight to any type of machine
My knowledge is the exact opposite. If the drop weight is true constant pull, then the drop weight should result in a firmer string bed. Some say lock out tension should be 5% higher than true constant pull to make up for the lack of constant pull. My machine is drop weight constant pull and my experience is it results in tighter string beds when compared to a friends lock-out crank type machine.

Some electrics are constant pull and some are not. But, an electric constant pull machine should give similar results to a drop weight constant pull.
Please see the bolded part of my post. A tensioning system is only as good as the clamps that hold the tension. In the case of the Gamma drop weight I had, it came with two Gamma floating clamps. They did not hold tension anywhere near as well as the fixed clamps on my Neos.

I am unaware of any electric tensioner that is not constant pull. Can you provide examples? I know with my Wise, it has two modes, lockout and CP. To ease the transition and deliver a consistent string bed, when I first started using it, I would set the tension that I had been using and select lockout mode. I would then give it a couple of seconds to settle and notice the tension number. Then I'd select that tension and select constant pull.

IME, the Wise in constant pull mode delivers a more consistent string bed than the lockout tensioner. Now, that may all be in my head, but that's what I feel. Both of these tensioners however delivered a firmer string bed than the drop weight I had. Again, it is probably solely attributable to the clamps. But clamps matter more than your tensioner in providing consistent results.

I don't think one can state categorically that one tensioner is more accurate or better than another without considering the supporting elements of the machine, clamps, mounting system, etc.
 

mad dog1

G.O.A.T.
I am unaware of any electric tensioner that is not constant pull. Can you provide examples?
some of the eagnas electric stringers are not true constant pull. the old mutual power electric machine was not constant pull either.
 

esgee48

Legend
Some of the Eagnas electric stringers were really LO. They would pull to tension and then stop. True electronic CP machines would be pulling every few seconds as the string relaxed or stretched. You can see and hear this on a true electronic CP.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
An example of a LO electronic stringer would be the Pro Stringer

http://youtu.be/Hc-w8LK_fLs

You can jump ahead to 5:15 in the video to see where tension is pulled. Notice once the tensioner reaches tension it never pulls again.
 
Top