Logic for 2nd racquet

#1
50+ years old, intermediate (some people say advanced) level playing about 3 times a week on average, mostly clinics, round robins and games with friends.
Although I currently own 6 racquets, I normally carry 2 in my bag.
Racquet n. 1 is always the favorite one, currently a Wilson PS97, racquet n. 2 is a Prince Phantom Pro 100. While I don’t love the Phantom, this is the racquet I used when I had TE problems and I keep it in the bag…. just in case my elbow decides to hurt again.
The elbow is now definitely cured and I wouldn’t mind carrying something I can use once in a while or whenever I need/like something different from racquet n. 1.
What’s your logic for choosing racquet n. 2?
Is your n. 2 just a spare one and therefore identical to n. 1 or some different “weapon”?
 
#3
50+ years old, intermediate (some people say advanced) level playing about 3 times a week on average, mostly clinics, round robins and games with friends.
Although I currently own 6 racquets, I normally carry 2 in my bag.
Racquet n. 1 is always the favorite one, currently a Wilson PS97, racquet n. 2 is a Prince Phantom Pro 100. While I don’t love the Phantom, this is the racquet I used when I had TE problems and I keep it in the bag…. just in case my elbow decides to hurt again.
The elbow is now definitely cured and I wouldn’t mind carrying something I can use once in a while or whenever I need/like something different from racquet n. 1.
What’s your logic for choosing racquet n. 2?
Is your n. 2 just a spare one and therefore identical to n. 1 or some different “weapon”?
I’ve battled this one as well. I’m the same age (48) and my main stick is a V sense 10-325 and my second one is a Super G 295 weighted up to similar specs. Thinking of getting a second V-sense strung a bit lower same string just for the days I’m lazy. But the Vsense is crisper but still arm friendly so don’t know in your case. Maybe a second PS97 but with a more arm friendly setup with hybrid strings? Although I would do that with two PS97’s considering you’ve already have had TE.


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McLovin

Hall of Fame
#4
What’s your logic for choosing racquet n. 2?
Is your n. 2 just a spare one and therefore identical to n. 1
Yes...and no.

If I’m playing a tournament or USTA match, then 1, 2, and 3 are identical, down to the string/tension/overgrip. I’m a mental case, so if I take the equipment out of the equation, then I’m the only variable, meaning if I’m hitting the ball long, it’s my fault, not the racquet’s.

But, if I’m playing for fun, I may bring one or two different frames along just to goof around with.
 
#5
I tried to bring two identical racquets but since I'm not a pro player I decided that I should bring three racquets to all my matches, the first one is a PS17, the second one is a Ezone DR98, they both play pretty similar but the Ezone is more arm friendly in case I need it and it has a more control oriented configuration, the third one is the a WUT in case I'm in desperate need of control.

To practice I always carry three racquets and they vary depending on the mood and what I want to try.
 
#6
50+ years old, intermediate (some people say advanced) level playing about 3 times a week on average, mostly clinics, round robins and games with friends.
Although I currently own 6 racquets, I normally carry 2 in my bag.
Racquet n. 1 is always the favorite one, currently a Wilson PS97, racquet n. 2 is a Prince Phantom Pro 100. While I don’t love the Phantom, this is the racquet I used when I had TE problems and I keep it in the bag…. just in case my elbow decides to hurt again.
The elbow is now definitely cured and I wouldn’t mind carrying something I can use once in a while or whenever I need/like something different from racquet n. 1.
What’s your logic for choosing racquet n. 2?
Is your n. 2 just a spare one and therefore identical to n. 1 or some different “weapon”?
i think I’d go with racquet no 1. It’s your favorite racquet so I would get another one. You could keep racquet number 2 just in case you overdo it with your arm. But you may be able to minimize arm problems with strings, tension, grip, lessons. etc.
 
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#7
I have always had 2 identical racquets in the bag, but lately I have had a 3rd different racquet. Usually I only use the 3rd one when I break the strings on the other two and I find it pretty annoying to have to readjust my game to the new racquet.

If the fun in tennis for you comes from becoming a better player (technique, strategy, etc.), then try to have identical racquets.

If the fun comes from playing around with different setups (racquets, strings, etc.), then have a different racquet in the bag.
 
#8
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If the fun in tennis for you comes from becoming a better player (technique, strategy, etc.), then try to have identical racquets.

If the fun comes from playing around with different setups (racquets, strings, etc.), then have a different racquet in the bag.
does it really come down to that?
is constantly switching racquet slowing down the improving process?
 

kimguroo

Hall of Fame
#9
does it really come down to that?
is constantly switching racquet slowing down the improving process?
I agree. It won’t help.
Sometimes, I play well with my main racket then testing new rackets mess up my timing etc....
Then go back to main racket but I don’t play well so need to adjust again.

Honestly I have two main racket and two different rackets (one extension length and one slightly powerful racket than my main) in my bag. Switching racket is kind of a poison. If I play badly to my opponents then I should lose matches and develop my weakness in order to improve my skills but during the match, If I see my opponent weakness then I switch rackets. If I win those matches, I keep doing it and always thinking about switching rackets but it will not help me to develop skills.
 
#10
does it really come down to that?
is constantly switching racquet slowing down the improving process?
I can't this is what is happening to you, for sure, but there is a reason many pros stick with the same racquet for most of their career. This is not to say you should never switch as sometimes your game changes and your racquet can become a limiting factor (see Roger Federer).
 

time_fly

Professional
#11
if you play matches that you care bout winning / losing then I suggest 2 identical frames. I do have different string jobs with a full poly in one and a gut hybrid in the other so that I can pull out a bit more control-oriented setup for days when I need it.

I’m a racquetholic too, which is why I pull the “fun frames” out of the bag before playing matches ... eliminates temptation todo something stupid.
 
#12
like others have said,, if serious competition is your thing, then you want a identical backup for your main raket
but if fun tennis is what you want now, then different rakets would be my way to go, soo many good rakets out there now
and with "fleabay", picking up slightly used rakets that interest you, for cheap, is a bonus!!

ohh, btw,, when you finally decide what to do with the racket conundrum,, youll need to decide what string to string them with next (same or different),, haaaaaa
 
#13
I normally have 5 different racquets stuffed into my 3 racquet bag. They are all different and vary wildly in spec, no two are the same. My game thus suffers tremendously and drives me insane.

Dont be me.
 
#14
does it really come down to that?
is constantly switching racquet slowing down the improving process?
In one word: yes.

Because one keeps on being distracted by the equipment / adjustment required to the new equipment, instead of using this time focusing on one's game. Ideally, one finds a racquet / string set up that suit one's game and ability, buy a couple of those, and then forget about gear.

I too had a bout of TE, started playing with a DR98, which was good for the arm but didn't offer enough control for my game. Then bought a few Prince Phantom 93P 18x20, which I enjoyed a lot, but are proving a bit too challenging at my level. I have now settled with the Prince PP100P, and that's what I'll be playing in the foreseeable future. I carry two of those, with the exact same set-up. Might buy a 3rd one if I decide to play more singles tournaments.
 

dman72

Hall of Fame
#15
For any match of importance to me I'm bringing 2 of the same. If I lost a match because I broke a string and then couldn't have control with my second racket because I wasn't as grooved or warmed up with it...I'd feel stupid.
 

AMGF

Professional
#16
If the fun in tennis for you comes from becoming a better player (technique, strategy, etc.), then try to have identical racquets.

If the fun comes from playing around with different setups (racquets, strings, etc.), then have a different racquet in the bag.
This! (y)

When you play with a different racquet, the result for the same swing will be different. You will then need to slightly adjust all of your swings for the new frame/setup. If you stick with a certain setup, you muscle memory will lock in with that set up and you will be dialed in. No need to think, you'll just hit and get the expected result. That's why pros don't change their equipment (at least not during the season).

I used to carry 9 different frames and would adjust quickly to any of them. Now that I have only one frame, I don't need to adjust. Frames play exactly the same and I can focus on the game and not worry about anything else. It becomes instinctive.

In a ideal world you could carry a third frame with slightly stiffer strings if you play in conditions where the ball flies and if money is no object, a fourth frame with strings a bit more loose for when conditions make all your shots land short.
 

time_fly

Professional
#17
This! (y)
Now that I have only one frame, I don't need to adjust. Frames play exactly the same and I can focus on the game and not worry about anything else. It becomes instinctive.
Yeah, but how do you know you wouldn’t play better with a different racquet? There’s only one way to find out ...
 

AMGF

Professional
#18
Yeah, but how do you know you wouldn’t play better with a different racquet? There’s only one way to find out ...
Of course. Try as many frames as possible. Borrow from anyone willing to lend you their frames. At some point you should be able to tell what type of frame you like. Then you demo a couple that are ball park of what you like. Then you choose. If you keep getting lured by the shiny new frame you'll never settle.

There is no magical frame built for you that will turn you into a pro player. There are a bunch of frames with different specs. Once you find a set of specs that works for you, you are set.

Testing has to stop at some point. That's how I see it.
 
#19
I am no high level racket wielder, but, my idea is to have two rackets that are similar but one geared for comfort and the other for control. My comfort one has currently Crossfire ZX hybrid (29kg/21kg), which gives loads of spin and feels comfortable. The control one has poly strings (26kg). They are the same frame (63RA), weighted about as close I can get.
 

max

Hall of Fame
#20
This is a good subject, but covered before. Here's my two cents.

Most tennis players should have two similar racquets. Should the string in one break during a match, recourse can be hand to #2.

I used to use four frames. Nos. 1&2 were identical. No. 3 was strung a good bit tighter (sometimes in competitive cases, nerves affect my swing, so tigher means more likely to keep the ball in). And No. 4 was strung looser, for use on clay.
 

max

Hall of Fame
#21
Of course. Try as many frames as possible. Borrow from anyone willing to lend you their frames. At some point you should be able to tell what type of frame you like. Then you demo a couple that are ball park of what you like. Then you choose. If you keep getting lured by the shiny new frame you'll never settle.

There is no magical frame built for you that will turn you into a pro player. There are a bunch of frames with different specs. Once you find a set of specs that works for you, you are set.

Testing has to stop at some point. That's how I see it.
Good stuff here. Don't freak at making a choice: in every case, both you and the racquet will take a month or two to get acclimated to each other. Then you know and respect each other.
 
#22
It really depends on your goals in tennis. If your goal is to play at your highest level all the time, you should have 2 that are identical. But if your goal is have fun, try different rackets, etc., then you know approximately what racket you play best with, so try the rackets from other companies. You know what you can afford. You never know, you may end up with a new favorite.
 
#23
if youve never owned 2 similar frames, i would say go for it and scratch that itch!!,,
but if you have and are having doubts about adding more racquets to your collection,, at least make it a completly different adition, a fun one to take out once in a awhile
 
#24
When I last played competitively I carried 5 racquets. Two BLX PS90, one PS85 re-issue with the 90s as my primary. My two back-ups depending on opponent were the Volkl 93 pb10 and PS 95S.
 

Fintft

Hall of Fame
#25
I love to have at least one more identical racquet due to sweaty hands. Ideally same string, or a more durable one for serve practice. Especially if I have 3 racquets.
 
#26
I'm a racquetaholic, so all the sticks that I bring are different.
Same lol. I play with whatever suits the condition I'm in that day. What's in my bag:

RF 97A - Ran 12 miles this week, lifted a bunch of weights and I'm feeling good.
Pure Aero - Just ate at the buffet, having food coma and don't feel like putting in the effort.
Blade 98 18x20 - It's hot & humid out and I can't find the court.
Phantom Pro 100 - eff you tennis elbow.
 
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