Looking to compile a history of Rossignol rackets

sekii

New User
thanks AG

did you know about it or did you find it on the net?


do you have any idea how much i could put it in sells?

thanks for your time
Simon
 
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galain

Hall of Fame
I found a near mint Rossi at Goodwill a few months ago, and I haven't seen
another one posted here, so.................

I've seen a few of these from time to time and am just never in the right mood to grab them when they come up. Almost convinced it's the same frame as Emrik's Vila 2000 which was very popular in Australia in the early mid 80's. I've also seen it in another cosmetic too - PK's Blue Knight I think? Nice hitting frame.
 

Hannah19

Professional
You mean the "Blue Ace" by Kennex.
Rucanor had a similar frame and dito colours called the "PRO".
It's first version had a silver/black colour scheme.
Together with a Wilson Advantage I strung this one up with a soft poly at 25/23 kg and played with it yesterday. Very nice ground strokes and lots of top spin.
 

galain

Hall of Fame
Indeed! The Blue Ace from PK - not to be confused with the Black Knight from PK. Thanks Hannah19.
 

Boristennis

New User
Earlier Rossignol.

May interest to know before US venture Rossignol's ski dept in France produced:

TR-10 (fiberglass a little like the head swing)

TR -20 (stiffer version)

TR-30 became R-30 forerunner of R-40.

These were before stratos released (they bought Garcia and its a 240)

Pierre Barthes was their original lead player (above released early 1977).
 

Autodidactic player

Professional
F150 = redheaded step-child of a tryst gone horribly awry between an F200 and a Yonex R-series...they tried to equalize the length of the crosses like the did with the inverted bridge matching the radius of the upper hoop. Absolute disaster aesthetically as well as on-court performance ...
Agreed, a complete disaster. It plays like a wet noodle! It was introduced in 1984 and only lasted two years. Here is a picture:

 

elystrae

New User
When i was younger, i used to play whith a F300 carbon. 3 years ago, i started my collection of racket and got an F300 carbon. I just found an F300 carbon.S, i have no info about this one; it have exactly the same look of the F300 carbon. Does anyone of you have infos about this f300 carbon.S?
 

Sanglier

Semi-Pro
Resurrecting an ancient (and mostly-ruined) thread to share another unusual Rossignol frame that I just discovered. Hopefully Imgur won't go the way of Photobucket and Tinypic for a while yet.

After finding the asymmetric "DV Boron" in 2012 (a blurred image of which can still be seen on the previous page), I learned that Rossignol had decided in the early '90s that asymmetry was going to be the next breakthrough in racquet technology. They filed a bunch of patents between 1992 and 2001 on all sorts of asymmetric configurations (some more subtle than others), which were supposed to not only tame frame vibrations, but also allow the player using such a racquet to "deceive" the opponent by generating different ball trajectory and spin rate depending on which racquet face is used to strike the ball. They even went so far as to propose disguising the more obvious asymmetries using mock features (e.g., a non-structural beam) to further confuse and confound the hapless adversary (but somehow sparing the person holding the wonder weapon from suffering the same fate).

Of all the funky propositions described in the patents, the only iteration that was produced in some quantity was the frame that had a slanted cross-brace in the throat. My "DV Boron" on the previous page is still the only example of its kind to show up in a google image search. I just assumed that none of the other designs made it to actual production, until a French vendor listed the racquet below on fleabay a few weeks ago:




I recognized the lopsided 'bridge' from one of their 1995 patent drawings. Other than the visible asymmetry, this frame also employs differential core density to enhance behavioral asymmetry, and a unique string dampening system at 3 and 9 o'clock with a comically Frenglish name (which demonstrates that creative neologism is not just an East Asian affliction). I have not had a chance to play with it yet, but did test it for flex. One side came out 64.6 RA, the other side 65.2 RA - not enough to make any real world difference in my opinion, so the ability of this thing to deceive its enemy, if any, must come from something other than differential flex.

Given that at least three of the asymmetric iterations in Rossignol's patent drawings made it to production, I'm now wondering if ALL of them were manufactured at some point. I'd be particularly interested in seeing and testing an example of the one-legged creation in the upper right, which 'might' have been produced with a 'mock leg' on one side, as something this bizarre would not have gone unnoticed even by the most casual of observers.

 

Kevo

Legend
Out of the Rossignols I've hit with, I think the more basic frame designs of the F200 series are the best. The ones with fiberglass. The F250 is all graphite I think and it has a decidedly more modern feel to it which I don't like as much. There's something about the basic thin beam foam filled fiberglass that just makes me happy whenever I hit with it. The sweetspot seems large for the frame size and the spin is quite good too. I've hit some of my best kickers ever with my F230.
 

Don't Let It Bounce

Hall of Fame
Given that at least three of the asymmetric iterations in Rossignol's patent drawings made it to production, I'm now wondering if ALL of them were manufactured at some point. I'd be particularly interested in seeing and testing an example of the one-legged creation in the upper right, which 'might' have been produced with a 'mock leg' on one side, as something this bizarre would not have gone unnoticed even by the most casual of observers.
I have one of those frames, an F200 Série 2 with the angled torsion bar shown in Fig. 2. It's a thin-beamed midplus with the Rossi inverted bridge and understated multi-color gradient paint, and it plays beautifully. It has a big enough head for the hand-eye challenged, like myself, to hit with spin, and it has the cushioned feel that the best Prince frames had.

Ah, here's one:

(Look at it: it's like it's saying, Don't You Want Me, Baby?)

I was actually going to post in another Rossi thread requesting ideas for a thin-beam, larger-headed, inverted-bridge Rossi, flexible, but stiffer than wood — something between the F300 and the widebodies of the late 80s and early 90s — but this one fits the bill perfectly.
 
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Sanglier

Semi-Pro
Figure 4 up there looks suspiciously like an upcoming Prince design I think I've seen in the Racquets forum.
Rossignol's patents expired many years ago, so anyone can make and market these if they so wished. The tilted cross brace design, by Jacques ***** (who also designed a number of ski and binding features for Rossignol), is intended to help reduce frame vibration through phase shifting (like on noise cancelling headphones). ***** claimed that a 20 degree tilt is ideal, but his patent covered the range between 15 degrees and 60 degrees. I haven't seen the racquet forum thread where the new Prince design is discussed; it would be interesting to find out what their rationale is to revive this odd feature.

Edit: It looks like poor Jacques' last name is too close in spelling to an epithet in English to pass the auto-censor. It is the French word for a bundle of kindling, not a nasty word at all!
 
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coachrick

Hall of Fame
Figure 4 up there looks suspiciously like an upcoming Prince design I think I've seen in the Racquets forum.

While looking for a photo of the F200 Série 2, I came across these:

The 9R Yellow Power (and if you don't love that name, there is no joy in your soul):


The 9R Blue Power (somehow less delightfully named and not even especially blue):


The 4R Graphite Master:
Did anyone notice the trim string(trebling)???
 

teachingprotx

Hall of Fame
I met Svensson almost 20 years ago. He was using a paint job. It look like a F295 without the VAS painted purple strung with Tecnifibre. While Rostagno used the FT5.60 with Vectris paint job.
So do we happen to know what was svensson really using under his rossignol paint job ?
from all the crappy pics I can find it looks like his frame does have those ( Rossi style ) weight bulges at 3 and 9o’clock. Or is that a paint job illusion?
Very interested in this
 

teachingprotx

Hall of Fame
Man I do so love rossignols. My faves are the FCx models and the R90 ?
can’t recall the other Rossi frame that is basically the FCX ( most flexible of all the f200 model I think )
Also a cool trick if you love the Rossi f200 but can’t stand the weight anymore I have good news :)
You can buy the fcx and or the r 90?)
And take off / cut off rather the super thick and heavy bumper gaurd and can get it down to a more manageable weight .
For me it’s still too heavy but I’m weak in the shoulders but for a normal person it may be just enough weight loss to be able to use for years to come !
 
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jhupper

Rookie
Resurrecting an ancient (and mostly-ruined) thread to share another unusual Rossignol frame that I just discovered. Hopefully Imgur won't go the way of Photobucket and Tinypic for a while yet.

After finding the asymmetric "DV Boron" in 2012 (a blurred image of which can still be seen on the previous page), I learned that Rossignol had decided in the early '90s that asymmetry was going to be the next breakthrough in racquet technology. They filed a bunch of patents between 1992 and 2001 on all sorts of asymmetric configurations (some more subtle than others), which were supposed to not only tame frame vibrations, but also allow the player using such a racquet to "deceive" the opponent by generating different ball trajectory and spin rate depending on which racquet face is used to strike the ball. They even went so far as to propose disguising the more obvious asymmetries using mock features (e.g., a non-structural beam) to further confuse and confound the hapless adversary (but somehow sparing the person holding the wonder weapon from suffering the same fate).

Of all the funky propositions described in the patents, the only iteration that was produced in some quantity was the frame that had a slanted cross-brace in the throat. My "DV Boron" on the previous page is still the only example of its kind to show up in a google image search. I just assumed that none of the other designs made it to actual production, until a French vendor listed the racquet below on fleabay a few weeks ago:




I recognized the lopsided 'bridge' from one of their 1995 patent drawings. Other than the visible asymmetry, this frame also employs differential core density to enhance behavioral asymmetry, and a unique string dampening system at 3 and 9 o'clock with a comically Frenglish name (which demonstrates that creative neologism is not just an East Asian affliction). I have not had a chance to play with it yet, but did test it for flex. One side came out 64.6 RA, the other side 65.2 RA - not enough to make any real world difference in my opinion, so the ability of this thing to deceive its enemy, if any, must come from something other than differential flex.

Given that at least three of the asymmetric iterations in Rossignol's patent drawings made it to production, I'm now wondering if ALL of them were manufactured at some point. I'd be particularly interested in seeing and testing an example of the one-legged creation in the upper right, which 'might' have been produced with a 'mock leg' on one side, as something this bizarre would not have gone unnoticed even by the most casual of observers.

Hi, has the listing for that racket gone? I can't seem to find it anymore.
 

Fedinkum

Legend
I have a wood Rossignol but in the modern open throat design. I will dig it up and post pic when I Get out of bed!
 

jhupper

Rookie
If you are looking for the closed listing, it's 273997166482. And, in case it's not obvious already - I now own this particular racquet.
Looks like you got a deal. I know someone who is selling one but they want way more than that so I've walked away for now.
 

Fedinkum

Legend
Rossignol GW200
Composition: Ply / Graphite Composite.
Strung Weight: 355g
Beam Width: 15mm
Head Size: Approx.85in? (Is slightly smaller than PS90)
Balance: 325mm

Quite a well made racket, and feels lovely in your hand.

 

galain

Hall of Fame
Rossignol GW200
Composition: Ply / Graphite Composite.
Strung Weight: 355g
Beam Width: 15mm
Head Size: Approx.85in? (Is slightly smaller than PS90)
Balance: 325mm

Quite a well made racket, and feels lovely in your hand.

Yep - that's the one I was trying to remember earlier in this thread. I'd put money on it being the same as the Emrik Vila 2000 and the Pro Kennex Blue Ace.
 

Spin-A-Lot

Rookie
Rossignol GW200
Composition: Ply / Graphite Composite.
Strung Weight: 355g
Beam Width: 15mm
Head Size: Approx.85in? (Is slightly smaller than PS90)
Balance: 325mm

Quite a well made racket, and feels lovely in your hand.

This is the one I got recently!

 

vsbabolat

G.O.A.T.
Is this odd creation a member of the short-lived reboot series? It looks like it could have been a cousin of that purple "Phenomene" in Hannah's collection, only suffering from a more severe case of birth defect. The responsible party at the "Rossignol Research and Development Department" who created this chef d'oevre clearly believed that frame symmetry below the hoop is completely optional. After hitting a few balls with this thing, I'm inclined to agree with him/her/them.


That looks similar to new racquet by Prince
 

Sanglier

Semi-Pro
That looks similar to new racquet by Prince
When I posted this DV (Double Variation) frame 10 years ago, I hadn't looked into Rossignol's patent history yet. In my update last year (post #58 above), you can see that this strange beast was among the many strange beasts they had proposed in their patents (cf. the upper left drawing labeled "1/2" and "Fig. 1"). In this iteration, the fat arm is given a radial taper (hence the twist illusion), while the skinnier arm is conventionally shaped. However, as @Don't Let It Bounce noted in post #63, the drawing labeled "2/8" and "Fig. 3" in the upper middle panel does bear a strong resemblance to the Prince Twistpower.

As I knew nothing about the Prince offering at the time, I wrote my response in post #64 with the erroneous assumption that @Don't Let It Bounce was referring to the "Fig. 4" drawing in the lower right panel (showing one of the tilted brace iterations). In fact, the twisted throat design in "Fig. 3" had nothing to do with the tilted brace designs, and was developed by a separate team for completely different reasons. In the relevant patent description, the inventors Johan Vailly and Bernard Laurencin explained that the twist would result in a slightly rotated string bed plane relative to the grip plane, such that you can generate more spins with this racquet than with a conventional frame (specifically top spin on the forehand side, and slice on the backhand side), without having to adjust your grip (which begs the question - When did grip adjustment become a problem that needed an engineering remedy? And the follow-up question - What if you wanted to slice your forehand and put top spin on your backhand? As well as the follow-up follow-up question - What about the lefties?).

Based on what is visible, Prince's Twistpower does appear to be a retread of the Rossignol idea (or the convergent expression of an independent idea). However, Prince's twist seems to go the full 90 degrees (to restore parallel planes between the string bed and the grip); whereas the original Rossignol version, if it was ever implemented in accordance with the patent description, was meant to stop just short of that. For reasons that we can only speculate, this idea (along with most other unusual ideas in this series) went nowhere the first time around. We shall witness soon enough whether Prince would have any better luck with theirs.
 
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Spin-A-Lot

Rookie
My Dad got this at our version of Goodwill stores in Sydney (Salvos or St. Vinnies). It was NOS but the original grip has disintegrated. I had it strung and replaced the grip with a cheap Mizuno replacement grip. When I tested it the VAS plaque on the throat fell off! Had to glue it back on.

 
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