Loose grip for slice?

acintya

Hall of Fame
#1
people only speak about the grips on slice but i want to know if you hold you racquet very hard when you slice or if you loosen your grip and hold it soft?
 
#3
For a BH slice my grip is pretty relaxed at the start and finish of the forward swing. As the racquet head is accelerated during the forward swing, the grip should be allowed to firm up naturally. I don't really think about squeezing the grip at all on groundstrokes -- I just let is happen. (For volleys of slow incoming balls, however, I do intentionally squeeze at times).

I think a loose wrist for a slice is not needed as racket head speed is not important. it is almost like a volley.
But the OP question was about grip (finger) pressure, not wrist firmness. Note also that some slice BHs do require a fair amount of RHS. Many players can hit a pretty vicious BH slice. Consider also that the spin rate for a BH slice will often exceed topspin spin rates. It takes RHS to produce a high spin rate. Roger and Rafa averaged 3700 RPM on spin study reported by Yandell's TP.net web site. Roger topped off at an amazing 5300 RPM on his slice.

http://www.tennisplayer.net/public/avancedtennis/john_yandell/modern_pro_slice_1/
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
#4
Depends on the kind of slice you're making.
For just a reset defensive baseline slice, loose grip can work just fine.
For a driving, low skidding slice, you need to tighten up the whole body, including the grip, for a solid unit.
Also for slice passing shots, you need to tighten up, swing firm and solid, but huge racket head speed is not as necessary as for forehand passing shots.
 
#5
I would hold my racquet the same for a siice as I would for any other shot.
The loose wrist idea is a pretty bad way to think about it I think. Loose implies softness or a lack of energy or power.
I much prefer the term "smooth". I move around the court and swing my racquet in a smooth way(or at least I try).
The idea is to be moving and hitting with high energy and intent without muscling the ball, or tightening from nerves.
 
#6
I would hold my racquet the same for a siice as I would for any other shot.
The loose wrist idea is a pretty bad way to think about it I think. Loose implies softness or a lack of energy or power.
I much prefer the term "smooth". I move around the court and swing my racquet in a smooth way(or at least I try).
The idea is to be moving and hitting with high energy and intent without muscling the ball, or tightening from nerves.
How about the grip -- the fingers? OP was was specifically asking about grip pressure rather than wrist firmness.
 
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#8
I would reply, but I can't quite make sense of what you are talking about.
You were talking about a "loose wrist" in your earlier post. However, acintya was asking about how tightly the grip should be held. That means he was talking about the fingers (and the hand) rather than the wrist. What are your thoughts about grip (finger) pressure?
 
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Aretium

Hall of Fame
#9
You were talking about a "loose wrist" in your earlier post. However, acintya was asking about how tightly the grip should be held. That means he was talking about the fingers (and the hand) rather than the wrist. What are your thoughts about grip (finger) pressure?
I seriously doubt you can consciously tense the fingers without locking the wrist.
 

LeeD

Bionic Poster
#10
The world is not black, nor is it white.
Your fingers don't need to death grip to lock the wrist, and you can lock the wrist without a death grip with your fingers.
Shades of gray. A tightER grip might tighten the wrist somewhat, but doesn't mean it's locked.
 
#11
I seriously doubt you can consciously tense the fingers without locking the wrist.
Perhaps, perhaps not. Regardless, much better to focus on the finger pressure or grip firmness for the OPs concerns IMO. The golf hint below demonstrates something similar to what I use with tennis students:


You can perform this drill/exercise with racquet straight up as shown in the golf video. However, I normally do this with the racquet dropping from its high position in a groundstroke backswing/loop to the low (slot) position prior to the forward swing. With high finger pressure (tight grip), you will feel the handle of the racquet but will not have much feeling of the racquet head dropping.

With a relaxed grip, you should have a much better feel of the position and the movement of the falling racquet head. This should produce more a controlled swing path -- and more consistent results overall. It should also be more conducive to generating greater RHS (for more ball spin and/or for more ball speed).
 
#13
I'd say pressure at "3" on a scale of 1-5 with "5" being the tightest. Firm through the stroke, but not a death grip that will kill too much fluid motion. Also "firm enough" that the racquet goes through the ball with a little authority.
 
#14
people only speak about the grips on slice but i want to know if you hold you racquet very hard when you slice or if you loosen your grip and hold it soft?
I think your grip should be as loose as possible on every shot. However, in my view, for a slice, it is important to maintain the angle between the arm and racquet throughout the swing which requires some firmness of the wrist, which should be the minimal firmness needed to maintain the angle.
 
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