Low cross tension relative to mains?

Dso

Semi-Pro
I know in hybrids it's not uncommon to string crosses a little lower than mains. I'm thinking about experimenting with regular full bed of say Xone Biphase. Even at 50 pounds the mains are restricted to some extent by the friction of crosses. There are active threads about using "lube" on the strings to help the mains' movement. Has anyone tried something like 50lb mains and 35-40lb on crosses- or something where the gap was significant in non- hybrids? What is it like? Loss of control?

See- this is the danger of having your own stringing machine!!! Albeit it's cheaper to string a racquet but now that you can do it yourself you try more things! LOL
 

TennisCJC

Legend
From some of the stuff we've seen here on TT, it is probable that someone has tried it.

I have seen pro specs where pro's string the crosses slightly lower than the mains but it usually just 2 or 3 lbs such as mains 50 with cross 48. The theory is this will open up the string bed and allow the mains to slide.

Personally, I think racket manufacturers suggest no more than a 5 lb difference between mains and cross. I would go with something like 50-47 or 50-46 and no more than 50-45.

But, like I said, I think I've seen some who use 10lbs difference - 50/40.
 
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esgee48

Legend
If you search for the Travlerajm threads on extra spin or very long lasting playable string beds, you will see mains between 80 and 90# and crosses between 40? and 60#. But they are using prestretched Kevlar and poly or ZX crosses. So, yes, these maniacs have had tension differentials of 40-50#. AND they did not destroy the frame. What you want is tension on the mains that snap back and crosses that basically just support the mains without too much friction. So you want mains > crosses. These folks don't care about frame deformation since they expect it to come out shorter than when going on the machine. If you care about 27" long going in and 27" coming out, then you're restricted to keeping differentials at 5# max. When I do clients' frames, I always have a length that is the same (+/- 1mm max) after I finished. For those demanding a hybrid, no warranty on length since I know the frame will deform.

Welcome to the world of Stringaholics.
 
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Dso

Semi-Pro
If you search for the Travlerajm threads on extra spin or very long lasting playable string beds, you will see mains between 80 and 90# and crosses between 40? and 60#. But they are using prestretched Kevlar and poly or ZX crosses. So, yes, these maniacs have had tension differentials of 40-50#. AND they did not destroy the frame. What you want is tension on the mains that snap back and crosses that basically just support the mains without too much friction. So you want mains > crosses. These folks don't care about frame deformation since they expect it to come out shorter than when going on the machine. If you care about 27" long going in and 27" coming out, then you're restricted to keeping differentials at 5# max. When I do clients' frames, I always have a length that is the same (+/- 1mm max) after I finished. For those demanding a hybrid, no warranty on length since I know the frame will deform.

Welcome to the world of Stringaholics.
I never really considered frame deformation! Maybe I can start at 50/45… not quite as harsh as 80/40!!!
 

Muppet

Legend
X-one has some texture on it, so varying the tensions will give the string bed a different feel. And with multis there is a lower limit to how low you can tension them before they feel loose. I wouldn't tension X-one below 52 lbs. in my 95" frame.
 

Dso

Semi-Pro
X-one has some texture on it, so varying the tensions will give the string bed a different feel. And with multis there is a lower limit to how low you can tension them before they feel loose. I wouldn't tension X-one below 52 lbs. in my 95" frame.
I use mostly 97/98" frames and have used XOne at 50lbs and have had no problems at all and they don't feel loose.
 

Kalethan

Rookie
I have been stringing a Yonex Duel G 97 with Monogut ZX 16 at 57lbs and Lux Element 16 at 50lbs. I know that the ZX will lose a lot of tension and the Element only a little for the golden hours of the stringjob. Eventually they even out at a very predictable-feeling, surprisingly even stiffness, maybe around 44 or so lbs. the mains slide and snap back well for a while, then gradually dent (not notch) and semi-lock, but at a low enough tension that they don't hurt my arm or play too badly for maybe 7 hours of play. ...
Now, I'm not telling you this so you go out to try that combo, but because it's the most successful of the widish tension differential I've done. I have not enjoyed my multi beds with more than 5 lbs of differential, and i think it's mostly because the spin-friendly smooth coatings are inevitably sawn through even faster with less-restrained mains. You may get an hour of deiciously increased spaghetti-Esque super multi grip, but soon will see either or both of string snapping and wild sling-shotting.

Just my experience! I think you should go for it. Also, stroke style and racquet specs make each string setup totally personal. One man's unplayable mess is another's goat


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Dso

Semi-Pro
Also, stroke style and racquet specs make each string setup totally personal. One man's unplayable mess is another's goat
I 100% agree with this. I've found that most racquet and string reviews are useless for this very reason. I also think that higher level tennis players are more keen to things that aren't as obvious to my meager 4.0 playing.
 

ultradr

Legend
I have been stringing a Yonex Duel G 97 with Monogut ZX 16 at 57lbs and Lux Element 16 at 50lbs. I know that the ZX will lose a lot of tension and the Element only a little for the golden hours of the stringjob. Eventually they even out at a very predictable-feeling, surprisingly even stiffness, maybe around 44 or so lbs. the mains slide and snap back well for a while, then gradually dent (not notch) and semi-lock, but at a low enough tension that they don't hurt my arm or play too badly for maybe 7 hours of play. ...
Now, I'm not telling you this so you go out to try that combo, but because it's the most successful of the widish tension differential I've done. I have not enjoyed my multi beds with more than 5 lbs of differential, and i think it's mostly because the spin-friendly smooth coatings are inevitably sawn through even faster with less-restrained mains. You may get an hour of deiciously increased spaghetti-Esque super multi grip, but soon will see either or both of string snapping and wild sling-shotting.

Just my experience! I think you should go for it. Also, stroke style and racquet specs make each string setup totally personal. One man's unplayable mess is another's goat


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Have you tried manually pre-stretching the ZX?
 

Kalethan

Rookie
Have you tried manually pre-stretching the ZX?
I actually find it's more likely to snap during stringing when substantially prestretched, and also looses much of the elasticity I prize it for. I just string it really slowly, so knots are less brittle but the mains end up decently stretched. I am aware I could get it to hold tension better in theory, but in practice I find ZX is Super prone to snapping unless I string it ludicrously slowly


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