make an opponent at the net volley in an upwards direction

oreo47

New User
hi
I have to set up a coaching lesson which help the players improve their ability to make an opponent at the net volley in an upwards direction . I was just wondering if anyone knew any drills/exercises with a scoring system/target I could set up?

also what are the technical and tactical tips for doing this. I already understand to make your opponent hit upwards on a volley you should hit low to them with spin. what else should be done?
 

fuzz nation

G.O.A.T.
hi
I have to set up a coaching lesson which help the players improve their ability to make an opponent at the net volley in an upwards direction . I was just wondering if anyone knew any drills/exercises with a scoring system/target I could set up?

also what are the technical and tactical tips for doing this. I already understand to make your opponent hit upwards on a volley you should hit low to them with spin. what else should be done?
Whenever I work on this with the high school teams I coach, we do it as a "set piece" with one player (or doubles team) at the net and the other at the baseline. The volleyer is trying to keep the opponent pinned deep and the baseline player(s) are trying to hit a low ball to that net player and attack. I haven't figured out a game or scoring system for this drill, but that would probably be helpful. Making up a sort of game with this progression also depends on the level of the players. Some won't be steady enough to sustain much of a rally in this mode of play.

Some coaches like to start a progression like this with the volleyer at the service line for the first volley or half-volley instead of being all the way up near the net when the action starts. This is a smart variation because that first shot for a player attacking the net often happens back around the service line, but that's when it's vital for that attacking player to pin an opponent in the backcourt with a deep first volley/half-volley.

Keep in mind that a low slice is also an ideal shot for neutralizing an opponent at the net. If any players you're working with have a slice or they're learning it, this is a great situation for putting it to good use. The backspin on a low slice can force an opponent at the net to hit with an even more open racquet face than when volleying a low topspin shot to keep the ball from going down into the net off the racquet face. Forcing that more open racquet face can also force a very weak volley.

A dipping topspin shot that gets low on a net player can be somewhat difficult to hit with accuracy. If that shot is a little short, it goes down into the net. If it's a little high, it's usually an easy drive for the opponent at the net. Because the slice has relatively flat trajectory, it can be easier for some players to simply send it at a relatively low height to be effective. It's not the go-to shot for everybody, but lots of players have a slice and it doesn't demand exceptional skill to hit it effectively in this setting.

On the other side of the coin in this set piece, I sometimes give the volleyer two targets. The first one is a deep volley - within perhaps three feet of the baseline - to keep the opponent pinned back there. The deep volley is usually the option for that volley that's hit around waist height. It's high enough to hit with some zip, but too low to allow for much of an angle.

The other target is the short angle - so this is actually two targets in one, since this angle can go toward either sideline. The short angle can be the smart option when the volleyer has to hit softly from down low (where it's pretty much impossible to drive the ball and keep it in the court). Although it's not a drive, it can force an opponent to lunge forward and hit up. The shorter angle is also a smart shot as more of a drive volley when the incoming ball is up high around shoulder or head height (not high enough to hit an overhead smash).
 
hi
I have to set up a coaching lesson which help the players improve their ability to make an opponent at the net volley in an upwards direction . I was just wondering if anyone knew any drills/exercises with a scoring system/target I could set up?

also what are the technical and tactical tips for doing this. I already understand to make your opponent hit upwards on a volley you should hit low to them with spin. what else should be done?
Two things which can be overlooked:
- hitting softly: hitting hard is not the only way to get the ball at your opponent's feet. If you are in a defensive position but can hit softly such that the volley is on the decline by the time it gets to your opponent, now he'll have to hit up. if I hit that ball hard, gravity won't affect it as much and my opponent will be in better position [from a ball height standpoint]

- moving in: after I hit my volley and I determine it was a good one that might force a defensive reply, I move in closer so I can catch their volley sooner.
 

Cashman

Hall of Fame
"Force your opponent to play an upwards volley" really means "play a shot that drops below the netcord quickly".

My coach once ran a drill where he set up a second net a metre or so into the opposing service box. We were required to drop as many balls as possible between the two nets (using topspin, touch, angles and so forth).

It was fun.
 
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