"Many" refurbished Prince Neos 1000s

graycrait

Hall of Fame
Got this from T e n n i s M a c h i n e s today. They posted a price of 899.00.

This is BIG!






We get asked all the time if we have any used machines, and now we can respond with an emphatic yes! We're excited to announce that our warehouse is full of Neos 1000 refurbished machines. Fixed up by our world-class technicians, each machine gets the necessary TLC to run as good as new, and even comes with a 1-year warranty. You need to act fast, though, because once they're gone, they're gone.



Description

The Prince NEOS 1000 stringing machine gives you a simpler, faster way to string and is designed for maximum ease and speed. The Neos 1000 has been the work horse of the industry for over 20 years. It's reliable, durable and holds its value better than any machine on the market.
  • Strong zinc-alloy, single action string clamp grips the string and glide bar in one easy move.
  • Easy to operate tip and throat rider hold down clamps quickly secure the racquet frame.
  • Height adjustable tip retainers fit any width racquet, including tennis, squash, badminton or racquetball.
  • Built-in glide bar rails are always parallel and aligned precisely for smooth movement.
  • Reversible, sliding handle on tension head increases maneuverability and clearance.
  • Streamlined tension head fairing won’t catch string, keeps mechanism clean and in adjustments
  • Machine weight: 80 lbs.
  • 1-year warranty
  • NEW String Clamps, Retainer pack, Dog kits
 
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Arvin_C

New User
So, this is a good deal? Is this a sensible machine to learn on?
I would hazard to guess that just about anyone who has strung professionally (either in the retail, club and/or tour level) since the 1980's has either learned on or has used the Prince NEOS. As esgee48 has stated, this is a fine machine to learn on and you WILL NOT outgrow it...you may move on to something else (electronic, different mounting system, etc.), but it won't be because the NEOS is lacking in any way.

The people at Te**is Ma**ines are great...they are tops for servicing and support. For the price they're asking for, you're pretty much getting a new NEOS for $300-$400 less than what you'd normally pay.

Arvin C
 
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1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
while I preffer electronic machines over cranks
the more I learned about different machines over the years, the more and more I like the simplicity of the prince neos 1000/1500 machines
would have been a great starting machine for me instead of my trusty dropweight
we have 2 electronic machines at work and when the power goes out, we carry on with the NEOS!!
 

Tar Heel Tennis

Professional
looking at their website, they also offer the Alpha Blu-DC refurb for the same price. which machine has more upside, or is it a case of half-dozen vs. 6?
 

Arvin_C

New User
looking at their website, they also offer the Alpha Blu-DC refurb for the same price. which machine has more upside, or is it a case of half-dozen vs. 6?
They are different enough to pick a side. The two machines are similar only in that they both use crank/lock-out type tensioners. If you look at the turntable and clamps, you will see that the Alpha Blu-DC has a 6-point mounting system and double-action clamps, while the Prince NEOS uses a two-point mounting system and glidebar/clamp setup. A 2-point mounting system (NEOS) secures the racquet at the throat/bridge and the top, while a 6-point mounting system adds mounting along the sides of the racquet as well. A 6-point mounting system can offer the potential for a more secure hold on the racquet with less potential for distortion during stringing, while the 2-point mounting system is much simpler to use.

The other big difference is the clamps. With double-action clamps (Alpha), the clamps are affixed to the turntable and are rotated into place. Once there, you lock the base then lock the clamp onto the string before releasing tension...this two step process is the "double-action". This type of clamping system offers great placement flexibility as well as ease-of-use, since the clamps are always affixed to the table. With the glidebar setup (NEOS), the clamps slide along a bar that moves along a grooved channel on the turntable. You slide the bar and clamp to the string that's tensioned and clamp it off...it's a single-action clamping process. However, with some racquets, it can be hard to get the clamp positioned exactly where you need it, if not downright impossible on some frames. Lastly, because the glidebar is not fixed to the table, you will need to switch the bar around as you move from mains to crosses.

Shameless plug: For $50.00 more, you could look at the Tourna 300-CS, which is the machine I just bought. It's like the Alpha in that it has a 6-point mounting system and double-action clamps. What makes it different is that its mounting system is self-leveling and self-centering, which is similar to the top-end machines that cost upwards of $2000.00. Ask a lot of pro stringers on this forum and they will tell you, this type of mounting system is hard to get away from once you're used to it.

If you wanted to sum it up, you could make the case that the NEOS will be the simpler machine to learn on, use and maintain. For the Alpha, the 6-point mounting system is more secure and stable and its clamps are easier to position, with the Tourna adding the aforementioned self-leveling and centering features. All three will do the job just fine, but in slightly different ways.

Arvin C
 

graycrait

Hall of Fame
@Arvin_C , I sure like the looks and functional aspects of that Tourna 300-CS and with a Wise it would be really really nice. Hard to beat the crank for reliability and no need for electricity. I know nothing about other machines other than the NEOS 1000 except that the college I hang out at quite a bit has two Gamma ELS electronic machines which seem indestructible to me but require electricity. They also have a Gamma crank (forget the model) that has been there "forever" and now mainly gathers dust.

I suppose one could break a NEOS 1000 but you would have to work at it I think. I know it can be done faster but one time I strung 4 Prince Classic Graphite 100s (16x18) in 65 minutes on my NEOS 1000. Normally it takes about 35 minutes for me to cut out the strings, look at the grommets and string. Grommet tubing or Fittex replacement adds time. Stringing a 98" 18x20 with Ashaway Kevlar x Zyex adds quite a bit more time but I don't think any machine can make stringing that setup any faster. When I was using Racquet Tune I was getting reference tension off the NEOS 1000. Also when I check calibration it is never off. The thing I would like on the Tourna or Alpha mentioned by Arvin-C is the locking clamps. With the NEOS 1000 glide bars you get some drawback with some strings when doing the mains. That drawback bugs me but I just get on with it and string away. I'm not sure a new NEOS 1000 would have the same amount of drawback. If I really cared I would buy new glide bars and/or clamps.

As @esgee48 mentions string-aholicsm is a real thing. I had it bad for several years. I think it would be worse for a younger player/stringer. Right now I have a reel of Gosen Proform Tuff 15L syn gut, a reel of Gosen OG Sheep Micro 16g syn gut, a reel of Prince Premier Control 16 multi, a partial reel of Wilson Revolve Poly 16g, a mini reel of Ashaway Kevlar 16g and 6 or so sets of string (poly, syn guts and Zyex). In the past I might have had 8 reels of string and 20 sets. I have spent way more on string than I have on the used NEOS 1000 I got from TM.

I only string for myself and maybe 10 friends. I discourage these 10 from telling other people where they get their rackets strung. I string their rackets for free or for string costs. If they want to give me some labor money I accept it but don't encourage them to do it. I don't want a part-time job stringing rackets. I probably string 2 rackets a month for my friends. However, I probably string 5/week for myself, some weeks more some less. I look at my 50-60 rackets some days and say to myself, 'I wonder what that string and tension would feel like in that racket, cut out the "old" string and restring the racket and go take it for a hit.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@Tar Heel Tennis, I am a machineaholic. I have owned 5 machines, a Tremont T-145 (don't ask), a Gamma drop weight (not my bag), a Prince Neos 1000, a Prince Neos 1500, and now a Babolat Mighty Sensor. I also purchased not one, but two Wise electric tension heads. I purchased both Prince machines new from TM. JC and company are top-of-the-charts. He knows machines inside and out, he is helpful to a fault, and he'll make you a great deal. They even take trade ins as I've discovered. No better company anywhere to deal with. And their support is best, bar none.

Now, as to the Neos 1000. It was the defacto standard for stringing. In many areas it still is. It is the descendant of the Ektelon line of stringing machines. In other words, all the kinks have been worked out. This machine is what tanks are designed after. This is what Chuck Norris strings on. And Chuck bought his 2nd hand from John Wayne. The Neos 1000 is reliable, built solidly, easy to string with, and a lifetime machine. Once you master the basics, the only thing slowing you down stringing is you. Some don't like the glide bar clamps, but they are rugged and once you get the hang of them, they are super fast. The tensioner is basically unchanged since the first machine rolled out, so it is also solid as a rock.

So why did I trade mine in for a 1500? Why did I sell my 1500? @Tar Heel Tennis, I have a problem. I am a machineaholic. Truth be told, the 1500 does address the one defect the 1000 has in my opinion. That is the mounting lock. On the 1000, it is a lever under the table. If you're not careful, you'll mount a frame and forget to lock it. The one frame I've broken in 40 years of stringing was due to that. The 1500 has all the mounting above the table, it's very hard to hose the mount and break a frame although I know someone who has. Likewise, the Mighty Sensor is the Great White of stringing machines. It's 200+ pounds of French technology that knows no fear. The turntable weighs about 75 pounds on that bad boy and is solid steel. The clamps don't know the meaning of the word slip. The tensioner is...well silent but deadly to borrow a phrase from high school. In other words, if you could want a feature on a stringing machine, the Mighty Sensor already has it. (If it doesn't have it, you just don't need it, Nancy!) It was (and still is to a large extent) THE stringing machine on tour. I would say that the Mighty Sensor is the last machine I'll ever buy, but then.....

Long story short, and seriously, you can not go wrong with a Neos 1000. TW has a video and there are countless videos on the internet that show you how to string and they use a Neos 1000. And the price they have it at is fantastic especially considering the amount of "new" they've included on the machine. The Alpha machine is a fine machine as well and I cannot fault it. You would do well with either.
 

Jster

Professional
while I preffer electronic machines over cranks
the more I learned about different machines over the years, the more and more I like the simplicity of the prince neos 1000/1500 machines
would have been a great starting machine for me instead of my trusty dropweight
we have 2 electronic machines at work and when the power goes out, we carry on with the NEOS!!

Have you done research on how much tighter you should go on the Neos to mimic ths sbs lik th electronic ones?
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
It's a decent deal, you can usually find used ones around 500-600 but if these have been fully refurbished it might be a good compromise vs. new.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
Have you done research on how much tighter you should go on the Neos to mimic ths sbs lik th electronic ones?
I'm not @1HBHfanatic, but I'd like to take a stab at it since I have experience. When I moved from the lockout on my 1000 to a Wise, I bumped tension down about 5 pounds to get the same feel. That may not hold true on all machines but it did from the lockout to the Wise. When I moved from the Wise to the Mighty Sensor, tension remained the same. I didn't have to make any adjustments.

It's a decent deal, you can usually find used ones around 500-600 but if these have been fully refurbished it might be a good compromise vs. new.
When you consider all the new parts alone, it really is better than decent in my book
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
I'm not @1HBHfanatic, but I'd like to take a stab at it since I have experience. When I moved from the lockout on my 1000 to a Wise, I bumped tension down about 5 pounds to get the same feel. That may not hold true on all machines but it did from the lockout to the Wise. When I moved from the Wise to the Mighty Sensor, tension remained the same. I didn't have to make any adjustments.



When you consider all the new parts alone, it really is better than decent in my book
I guess, my machine is pretty old and has all original parts. They don't really wear out so I don't see the additional value over a used but not abused one for 500-600
 

CosmosMpower

Hall of Fame
@Arvin_C , I sure like the looks and functional aspects of that Tourna 300-CS and with a Wise it would be really really nice. Hard to beat the crank for reliability and no need for electricity. I know nothing about other machines other than the NEOS 1000 except that the college I hang out at quite a bit has two Gamma ELS electronic machines which seem indestructible to me but require electricity. They also have a Gamma crank (forget the model) that has been there "forever" and now mainly gathers dust.

I suppose one could break a NEOS 1000 but you would have to work at it I think. I know it can be done faster but one time I strung 4 Prince Classic Graphite 100s (16x18) in 65 minutes on my NEOS 1000. Normally it takes about 35 minutes for me to cut out the strings, look at the grommets and string. Grommet tubing or Fittex replacement adds time. Stringing a 98" 18x20 with Ashaway Kevlar x Zyex adds quite a bit more time but I don't think any machine can make stringing that setup any faster. When I was using Racquet Tune I was getting reference tension off the NEOS 1000. Also when I check calibration it is never off. The thing I would like on the Tourna or Alpha mentioned by Arvin-C is the locking clamps. With the NEOS 1000 glide bars you get some drawback with some strings when doing the mains. That drawback bugs me but I just get on with it and string away. I'm not sure a new NEOS 1000 would have the same amount of drawback. If I really cared I would buy new glide bars and/or clamps.

As @esgee48 mentions string-aholicsm is a real thing. I had it bad for several years. I think it would be worse for a younger player/stringer. Right now I have a reel of Gosen Proform Tuff 15L syn gut, a reel of Gosen OG Sheep Micro 16g syn gut, a reel of Prince Premier Control 16 multi, a partial reel of Wilson Revolve Poly 16g, a mini reel of Ashaway Kevlar 16g and 6 or so sets of string (poly, syn guts and Zyex). In the past I might have had 8 reels of string and 20 sets. I have spent way more on string than I have on the used NEOS 1000 I got from TM.

I only string for myself and maybe 10 friends. I discourage these 10 from telling other people where they get their rackets strung. I string their rackets for free or for string costs. If they want to give me some labor money I accept it but don't encourage them to do it. I don't want a part-time job stringing rackets. I probably string 2 rackets a month for my friends. However, I probably string 5/week for myself, some weeks more some less. I look at my 50-60 rackets some days and say to myself, 'I wonder what that string and tension would feel like in that racket, cut out the "old" string and restring the racket and go take it for a hit.
Tighten up your feet on the glide bars, should help with the draw back. Mine were a little loose in the channels and once I loosened the screws and pushed the bottom plates of the feet in a bit everything tightened up. Be careful, you can over do it and the glide bars won't slide in the channel just back it out a bit in that case.
 
All you drop weight suckers, pony up the money the upgrade.
You will regret not doing it sooner. It's like a tricycle vs. a bicycle.
Both work, but one is WAY better
 

steveq81

Rookie
@Rabbit,

Great to hear from another Tremont Research user!

I started stringing in 1982 with a TR T-145 II, the "updated" model with the plastic string box that pivoted maybe 30 degrees or so. I think that was to help make it easier to accommodate the shoulders of the larger graphite racquets that were starting to come out. If I recall, the tension markings were also finer on this version than the original. Got it about a month after buying a Head Graphite Edge and was breaking strings in less than a week.

Bought a Neos 1000 in 1999 and have had no reason to look at upgrading.
 

grhcan99

Semi-Pro
I had an Ektelon before which was similar to the Neos 1000. I switched to a Neos 1500 because I had to string fan-patterned racquets.
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@steveq81, you lucky devil! I had the original. I thought I was high tech with that thing. I think the tension spring in that thing may have lasted two years.
 

Tar Heel Tennis

Professional
A sincere thanks to @Arvin_C, @graycrait and @Rabbit for you input. For ~$1000, the Neos 1000 and the Tourna 300-CS appear to be the front runners. I (believe I) understand the benefit of the 6-point mounting system; and the added self-leveling and self-centering justify the extra $50 for the 300-CS. Are there any other differences between the Neos and Tourna machine I need to be aware of? Why is the Neos normally $450 more expensive than the Tourna? Am I overthinking this decision?
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
A sincere thanks to @Arvin_C, @graycrait and @Rabbit for you input. For ~$1000, the Neos 1000 and the Tourna 300-CS appear to be the front runners. I (believe I) understand the benefit of the 6-point mounting system; and the added self-leveling and self-centering justify the extra $50 for the 300-CS. Are there any other differences between the Neos and Tourna machine I need to be aware of? Why is the Neos normally $450 more expensive than the Tourna? Am I overthinking this decision?
Actually the difference is only $30 ($995 + $35 shipping.) One big difference between the 2 is the NEOS is glide bar machine which does not work well on fan pattern and most Babolat fan out the outer main. The swivel clamps work well with fan patterns and the NEOS should be equipped with flying clamps. You will also have to move the clamps with the NEOS every time you switch from mains to crosses. The 300 CS does not have Self Centering that’s a Gamma Pantented exclusive option, but the 300 CS does have a single adjusting knob for the side supports at the top and bottom.

EDIT: I’ve never owned either machine but have had similar machines. Neither would be my first choice but if I had to pick between the 2 I would pick the NEOS.
 
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graycrait

Hall of Fame
@Tar Heel Tennis , I have never had a problem with NEOS 1000 2-point mounting system. 2-point is sort of a misnomer although it does focus the hold down across several inches at the top and bottom of the racket, no side supports. I've strung everything from 65" wood rackets to fan shaped rackets to 120" racket. I have not broken a racket yet.

I need to string on a Gamma or some other machine that has more "conventional" clamps just to see what I might be missing. But then I see @steveq81 say he has been using a NEOS 1000 since 1999, which causes me to want to put very little effort in seeking out another machine to get some experience on.
 

Arvin_C

New User
A sincere thanks to @Arvin_C, @graycrait and @Rabbit for you input. For ~$1000, the Neos 1000 and the Tourna 300-CS appear to be the front runners. I (believe I) understand the benefit of the 6-point mounting system; and the added self-leveling and self-centering justify the extra $50 for the 300-CS. Are there any other differences between the Neos and Tourna machine I need to be aware of? Why is the Neos normally $450 more expensive than the Tourna? Am I overthinking this decision?
Happy to help @Tar Heel Tennis! IMHO, the real reasons that NEOS machines command a premium is that they have a very well-earned reputation for build-quality, reliability, serviceability & resale value. As others have said, the NEOS 1000 started life as the Ektelon H, which was the most popular crank/lock-out stringer of all time. When Prince acquired Ektelon and eventually released the NEOS line, they were building upon a rich legacy of that machine.

Now, what I will say is that while I have used the NEOS for a good while during my professional stringing days, once I started using Babolat Star and Sensor machines, I became completely sold on the 6-point, self-leveling and centering mounting system. For me, it just gave me an increased level of confidence. In fact, I’ve been looking since last year to buy a used Babolat Star machine that wasn’t beat-up, didn’t need new electronics or clamps and was $1500.00 or less. Alas, nothing came up, which led me to get the Tourna...I am eventually going to add the Wise 2086 Tennis Head to it, which will turn it into an electronic, constant-pull machine that has all the features of those Babolat machines I grew to love using.

However, if what you value most is bulletproof construction and maximum value come resale time, there’s no denying that the NEOS will offer that to you. Both are wonderful machines; you can’t go wrong picking either.

Good luck!

Arvin C
 

Rabbit

G.O.A.T.
@Tar Heel Tennis, I too am glad to have helped. Not enough good things can be said about the NEOS 1000 or TennisMachines. Both are fantastic solutions for stringing. You could also call JC at TennisMachines and ask him which he would recommend as I believe they sell both. He will shoot you straight.
 

Tar Heel Tennis

Professional
...which led me to get the Tourna...I am eventually going to add the Wise 2086 Tennis Head to it, which will turn it into an electronic, constant-pull machine that has all the features of those Babolat machines I grew to love using.

However, if what you value most is bulletproof construction and maximum value come resale time, there’s no denying that the NEOS will offer that to you. Both are wonderful machines; you can’t go wrong picking either.

Good luck!

Arvin C
the more i'm learning, the dumber i'm becoming...so both the Prince and Tourna are lockout rather than constant pull. Yet constant pull is 'better' or more consistent than lockout. Am I correct so far? If so, purchasing a Wise 2086 (for either machine) would give me the constant pull benefit. Purchasing the Tourna stringer along with the Wise machine will give me all?/most? of the benefits of the high end machines? Am I missing something? Also, I'm reading that clamps are a vital piece of equipment and can cause a price difference between machines. If so, the CS-300 or Neos 1000 for better clamps, and can I upgrade either/or machine for improved performance? So sorry for all of the questions...wish there was a simple answer!

ETA - the next racket I string will be the first racket I string.
 

Arvin_C

New User
@Tar Heel Tennis

Ok, so to address the constant pull versus lockout tensioner, here's what I answered on another thread in these forums:
Constant pull simply means that the machine will pull the string to the desired tension and keep pulling the string to maintain that tension until you clamp off and release the string. Because of this, constant pull tensioners compensate for string elongation, which can result in more accurate, consistent results. As far as I know, all of the electronic machines on the market as well as all drop-weight designs are constant pull machines.

A lock-out tensioner stops pulling once the string is pulled to the desired tension...it does not keep pulling, even if there is string elongation. This could result in a string job that comes out at less than the desired tension. However, experienced stringers have come up with ways to compensate for this, especially with strings like natural gut, Zyex, soft multi-filiments, etc. One advantage of lock-out systems is speed...pardon the pun, but there are a lot of stringers who can "crank" out a lot of racquets on a lock-out machine. Back when I was stringing at a very large tennis-specialty warehouse, we had both electronic and lock-out machines and we were all faster on the NEOS's when we needed to be. The other advantage of lock-outs are that they are basically fool- and bullet-proof designs...there's just not a lot that can go wrong with a mechanical lock-out.
As with most things, it's just two different ways of doing things...the idea is to understand your particular machine and get really good at using it so you can turn out consistent and accurate results. You can get both of these things with either constant pull or lockout tensioners...don't be fooled by anyone telling you otherwise.

As far as the Wise Tennis Head, there are thousands of people who have converted their lockout/drop-weight machines to electronic constant pull with this unit. As I said, my desire to (eventually) have a machine as close to the Babolat Stars and Sensors motivated me to buy the Tourna as it was the only machine at the price-point with a similar mounting system and double-action clamps. When I factored in the $600'ish cost of the Wise, I'm right in the $1,500.00 range I was in when I was looking for used Babolat machines...with the advantages of having new equipment, while having warranties, readily available parts and service. Plus, should the Wise ever fail and need servicing, you can put the crank back on and keep stringing. For me, the Tourna 300-CS/Wise combo is as close as you can get feature-wise to a professional electronic stringer without shelling out $3000+ for a new Alpha Ghost 2, Wilson Baiardo, Yonex Precision, etc. If you look at those machines, you'll see they all are electronic constant-pull, have linear grippers, have double-action/swivel clamps and 6-point self-leveling mounting systems. That's what a Tourna 300-CS and Wise combo has.

The clamps for either the Tourna or the NEOS 1000 are equally capable...it's just the way they are implemented on each machine, ie. swivel-locking on the Tourna versus glide-bar in the NEOS. If you want double-action clamps on a NEOS, you can get them on the NEOS 1500 at a $700 (!!!) premium. The clamps themselves can always be replaced if needed, but at this level, they should last you for the life of the machine if you care for them properly.

As I said earlier, you can't go wrong picking one or the other...the fact the Te**is Ma**ines sells and services both is a testament to their quality and ability to get the job done.

No worries with the questions...there are lots of peeps on here and out there that are genuinely good people who are happy to share their knowledge and experience...Good luck!

Arvin C
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
The 300 CS does not have Self Centering that’s a Gamma Pantented exclusive option, but the 300 CS does have a single adjusting knob for the side supports at the top and bottom.
According to the Unique Sports website:

ITEM CODE: 300-CS

  • Manual Crank with Spring Loaded Tension Winder
  • Tension Range from 9 to 102 pounds
  • 6 point self-leveling quick mount system
  • Sturdy Height Adjustable Stand included
  • Includes 1 straight awl, 1 straight pliers, hex wrench set and wrench
Source: https://www.uniquesports.us/product/300-cs-tourna-stringing-machine/
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
According to the Unique Sports website:

ITEM CODE: 300-CS

  • Manual Crank with Spring Loaded Tension Winder
  • Tension Range from 9 to 102 pounds
  • 6 point self-leveling quick mount system
  • Sturdy Height Adjustable Stand included
  • Includes 1 straight awl, 1 straight pliers, hex wrench set and wrench
Source: https://www.uniquesports.us/product/300-cs-tourna-stringing-machine/
Just trying to figure this out, but how does that contradict what @Irvin said? And actually, what is self leveling? I assume they mean that with the V-shaped side supports, the racket will naturally fall into alignment?
 

Arvin_C

New User
Just trying to figure this out, but how does that contradict what @Irvin said? And actually, what is self leveling? I assume they mean that with the V-shaped side supports, the racket will naturally fall into alignment?
I agree...this is why I said that my Tourna has both self-leveling and self-centering mounting: as you turn the dials, both support arms adjust at the same time, which makes mounting the racquet centrally positioned on the turntable a very automatic process. As you state, the self-leveling part is largely due to the V-shaped supports holding the racquet frame level as the support arms close in. I had no idea that Gamma had exclusive rights to the term "Self-Centering". I thought I had heard that term used by the Babolat rep when we first got the Star 3 in the shop, but that was so long ago, I could be mistaken.

At any rate...sorry for any confusion, folks!

Arvin C

Edited for spelling
 

loosegroove

Hall of Fame
@Arvin_C , actually the Tourna is not self-centering. This term, in regards to the way Gamma defines it, means that the two towers automatically center to the middle of the table by the turn of one knob. The towers on your Tourna are independent, operated by separate knobs under each tower.
 

Arvin_C

New User
@Arvin_C , actually the Tourna is not self-centering. This term, in regards to the way Gamma defines it, means that the two towers automatically center to the middle of the table by the turn of one knob. The towers on your Tourna are independent, operated by separate knobs under each tower.
Ah, thanks for explaining that! Never thought about the way the towers adjusted...

Arvin C
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
According to the Unique Sports website:

ITEM CODE: 300-CS

  • Manual Crank with Spring Loaded Tension Winder
  • Tension Range from 9 to 102 pounds
  • 6 point self-leveling quick mount system
  • Sturdy Height Adjustable Stand included
  • Includes 1 straight awl, 1 straight pliers, hex wrench set and wrench
Source: https://www.uniquesports.us/product/300-cs-tourna-stringing-machine/
Self leveling is a function of the side supports where the V shaped support centers the racket in the center of the support. Self centering move the top and bottom standard in and out simultaneously so the racket is always centered between the standards. The 300 CS has a knob below the turntable so either standard can be moved in or out.
 

am1899

Hall of Fame
Just trying to figure this out, but how does that contradict what @Irvin said? And actually, what is self leveling? I assume they mean that with the V-shaped side supports, the racket will naturally fall into alignment?
My apologies to @Irvin - I didn’t intend for my post to come across as contradictory. I was myself wondering what “self leveling,” meant in relation to “self centering.” You guys explained it well, makes sense.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
The Gamma 6004 used to come with K side supports and self centering. When Babolat’s patent on the C / V side supports expired Gamma switched their side supports to the V type making the 6004 self centering and self leveling.
 
The Gamma 6004 used to come with K side supports and self centering. When Babolat’s patent on the C / V side supports expired Gamma switched their side supports to the V type making the 6004 self centering and self leveling.
Sorry to stray off topic, but how do you remove/attach the pads on the v-style side supports of a 6004? Do they pop off or do they slide off?

The reason I ask is because my used 6004 came with one side support pad that is smaller and thinner than the other 7 pads which I feel screws up the “self-leveling” feature. I ordered a new set of pads from Gamma, but I’d just like to know how they are attached.
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
There is a thumb wheel below the support arm to remove the Support but the pads just snap off and on. If one of your supports pads was smaller than the other 7 you should have contacted Gamma for a new one unless you got the machine used and someone else replaced one.
 
Thanks for the info. Definitely bought it used. The previous owner must have lost one and didn’t have another that matched. In my mind one side will be looser than the other since the self-leveling system assumes pads of the same thickness on either side.
 

1HBHfanatic

Hall of Fame
Thanks for the info. Definitely bought it used. The previous owner must have lost one and didn’t have another that matched. In my mind one side will be looser than the other since the self-leveling system assumes pads of the same thickness on either side.
not a big/hughe issue
these pads come off and get lost all the time, during movement, over time,, etc...
I used 2 dif. gamma machines at one point and both had missing pads
good thing you can buy and glue them on (with mo major modification)
btw the 2 critical pads are the center posts, they do all the serious work (on a 6pt mounting system), the other 4 are resting pads mainly!
 
Felt very stupid today when trying to get what I thought was a smaller pad off a side mount. I used flathead screwdrivers, razor blades, wire cutters and then pliers but still couldn’t get it off. My knuckles were bleeding, and I’d said a few words out loud that I normally don’t.

I finally realized there wasn’t a smaller pad on it at all. That’s just what it looks like when there is no pad installed! After this brainwave, I simply stuck the replacement pad I got from Gamma on and proceeded to laugh at my own stupidity.

Luckily I didn’t mangle the mount to the point that the pad wouldn’t go on. I scratched and scraped it up so badly that I’ve considered buying a new side mount from Gamma if it’s not too expensive. Still can’t believe I did this!
 

Irvin

Talk Tennis Guru
Luckily I didn’t mangle the mount to the point that the pad wouldn’t go on. I scratched and scraped it up so badly that I’ve considered buying a new side mount from Gamma if it’s not too expensive. Still can’t believe I did this!
A set of the side supports cost around $50 I think which includes the pads.
 

struggle

Legend
All you drop weight suckers, pony up the money the upgrade.
You will regret not doing it sooner. It's like a tricycle vs. a bicycle.
Both work, but one is WAY better
wait.

what?

I tricycle won't fall over.

busted.

Sorry, I've been out of the loop in rehab for a couple months.

Glad to see the experts are still chiming in.

Now, can you tell me how to tie a parnell NOT?
 
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