Match Stats/Report - Djokovic vs Federer, Wimbledon final 2014

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 6-7(7), 6-4, 7-6(4), 5-7, 6-4 in the Wimbledon final, 2014 on grass

It was Djokovic's 2nd Wimbledon title while Federer had been aiming for a record breaking 8th title and playing in a record extending 9th final

Djokovic won 186 points, Federer 180

Serve Stats
Djokovic...
- 1st serve percentage (108/174) 62%
- 1st serve points won (79/108) 73%
- 2nd serve points won (43/66) 65%
- Aces 13, Service Winners 4
- Double Faults 3
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (56/174) 32%

Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (133/192) 69%
- 1st serve points won (102/133) 77%
- 2nd serve points won (26/59) 44%
- Aces 29, Service Winners 4
- Double Faults 5
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (67/192) 35%

Serve Pattern
Djokovic served...
- to FH 36%
- to BH 60%
- to Body 4%

Federer served...
- to FH 53%
- to BH 45%
- to Body 2%

Return Stats
Djokovic made...
- 120 (58 FH, 62 BH), including 1 return-approach
- 5 Winners (2 FH, 3 BH)
- 34 Errors, comprising...
- 4 Unforced (3 FH, 1 BH)
- 30 Forced (21 FH, 9 BH)
- Return Rate (120/187) 64%

Federer made...
- 115 (39 FH, 76 BH), including 4 runaround FHs and 7 return-approaches
- 1 Winner (1 FH)
- 39 Errors, comprising...
- 15 Unforced (7 FH, 8 BH), including 1 runaround FH & 2 return-approach attempts
- 24 Forced (13 FH, 11 BH)
- Return Rate (115/171) 67%

Break Points
Djokovic 4/15 (8 games)
Federer 3/7 (5 games)

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Djokovic 48 (24 FH, 16 BH, 3 FHV, 3 BHV, 2 OH)
Federer 42 (19 FH, 3 BH, 7 FHV, 5 BHV, 1 BH1/2V, 6 OH, 1 BHOH)

Djokovic's FHs - 9 cc (2 passes), 4 dtl (3 passes - 2 of them returns), 6 inside-out, 2 inside-in and 3 at net
- BHs - 4 regular, 12 passes
- regulars - 3 dtl (1 return) and 1 inside-out return
- passes - 5 cc, 4 dtl and 3 inside-out (1 return)

- 1 FHV was a swinging shot from behind the service line and has not been counted a net point. 1 BHV was a drop

Federer's FHs - 8 cc, 2 dtl (1 return and the other when Djokovic fell), 4 inside-out, 1 inside-in, 2 longline and 2 drop shots
- BHs - 1 cc and 1 dtl pass

- 8 from serve-volley points
- 3 first 'volleys' (1 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 BH drop shot at net)
- 5 second volleys (1 FHV, 3 OH, 1 BHOH)

- other 'volleys' include -
- FHVs - 1 stop and 1 swinging
- BHVs - 2 drops
- BH1/2V was played net to net

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Djokovic 68
- 37 Unforced (21 FH, 15 BH, 1 BHV)
- 31 Forced (14 FH, 15 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 49.2

Federer 77
- 39 Unforced (16 FH, 18 BH, 3 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 OH)
- 38 Forced (22 FH, 14 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 43.6

(Note 1: all half-volleys refer to such shots played at net. Half -volleys played from other parts of the court are included within relevant groundstroke counts)

(Note 2: The 'Unforced Error Forcefulness Index is a measure of how aggressive of intent the average UE made was. 60 is maximum, 20 is minimum. This match has been scored using a four point scale - 2 defensive, 4 neutral, 5 attacking, 6 winner attempt)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Djokovic was...
- 22/29 (76%) at net, including...
- 3/4 (75%) serve-volleying, all first serves
---
- 1/1 return-approaching
- 0/1 forced back

Federer was...
- 40/65 (62%) at net, including...
- 16/22 (73%) serve-volleying, comprising..
- 13/19 (68%) off 1st serve and...
- 3/3 off 2nd serve
---
- 1/7 (14%) return-approaching
- 0/2 forced back

Match Report
One sided match for a five setter, with Djokovic significantly superior in all areas save the serve. Some credit for playing smart to make it as competitive as it was - and a lot more to Djokovic for being so much better

Federer has a thin lead in unreturned serves (35% to 32%) and a significant one on the first serve (69% in to 62%... 77% won to 73%). That's about it. Djokovic returns better (4 UEs to 15 for Fed) and plays a lot better (+6 on winners, - 2 on unforced errors and -7 on forced errors for an overall lead of +15 points). Serve aside, most of the action looks a mismatch. And atypical of the match up - Federer is a lot more passive than usual (smartly, I think)

Serve & Return
Naturally, Federer has the stronger serve. He bangs down unreturnable serves throughout the match - the small matter of 29 aces and 4 service winners. Djokovic also serves well
Almost as naturally, Djokovic has the stronger return. Note the 5 winners (Fed has 1). Federer... does not return well

What is unusual is Djokovic coming up ahead in the overall serve-return complex. When 1 player is the better server and the other the better returner, this is almost never the case on grass

For starters, Djokovic does fairly well to keep Fed down to 'just' 32% unreturned serves and Fed could do much better than allow Djok 32% unreturned serves

Second, a remarkably high number of Djokovic returns land on the baseline and force Fed to hit 3rd ball 1/2volleys, not just neutralizing the servers advantage but taking it for himself (or winning the point outright by forcing errors). How someone can hit the baseline that often without hitting a boatload of errors just long, I don't know... remarkable returning from Djok. And they're good, flat returns too, not loopy

Third, most of Fed's 'returnable' first serves get returned - with the odd one being hit to the baseline to boot. Solid and penetrating stuff on the return from Djok

Federer by contrast... misses makeable first serves (a couple have even been marked unforced, whereas a couple of his second serves drew forced errors.... such is the difference in the quality of the two players serves) and makes a hash of many a second serve return. And generally, isn't threatening with the return shot

Fed does throw in chip-charge returns. They are among the worst I've seen. Not so much chips as lofting the ball over as he takes the net, he manages to get them to the Djoko BH (which is his design), but leaves the Serb with time to position himself and line up the shot. Credit to Djoko for passing well - it is a pressure ploy, even with time to ready the shot - but not good approaches. Fed is 1/7 return-approaching (and makes 2 errors trying)

Clear also is Djoko reading Fed' serve better than the other way round. Djoko seemingly reads and moves towards Fed's wider serves to get into position and shows quick footwork to do so. Fed doesn't seem to read Djoko's serve and is sometimes lead footed in coping with wide serves, even second ones

Fed uses his head well. He distributes serves slightly more to the BH for the first half of the match. Against a returner like Djokovic, who seems to be equally good off both wings, this is the best starting point. Noticing the greater success he's having to the FH, Fed serves more to that side in the second half. Look at the numbers - 53% to FH, 45% to BH.... but forcing 21 FH errors, to 9 BH (and 3 FH UEs to 1 BH too)

Play - Baseline & Net
A good indicator of how players stack up is 2nd serve points won. Djoko wins 65% of his, Fed just 44%. The second figure is a bit confounded by Djoko's returning frequently not making rallying an equal starting point, but the first is a good indicator of the Serb's superiority in play

The unusual aspect of this match is that Federer is passive by his standards. 'Passive' in the general sense is too strong a word.... 'not attacking' might be the best way to put it

Note Djoko with 48 winners to Fed's 42 and forcing 38 errors to Fed's 31. Even more telling is Djoko's very high 49.2 UEFI and Fed's low 43.6... in matches between the two, you'd usually see these figures reversed

So what does a "passive" Roger Federer look like? He's not trying to lash winners with the FH or open the court wide open with the BH. You could say he's trying to push Djokovic on the defensive with moderately attacking shots when he's in a position to take the initiative. So many times I've seen Federer lose by making too many unforced errors going for outright winners... here, he's playing higher percentage attacking tennis. If he needs an extra attacking edge, he comes to net to finish points rather than go for the winner from the back

Ploy works well enough. Its still a tough task due to Djokovic's strong defence. It takes a stronger shot to force an error out of Djokovic than it does Federer.... this difference is one of the factors in Djoko's advantage in forcing errors and its an extension of Djokovic being more solid off the ground in general. The Serb doesn't miss many routine balls (one of the reasons for his high UEFI), Fed misses a fair few
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
For most of the match, Federer has fewer UEs than Djok. That changes in the last part of the match, when Federer reverts to a more aggressive game and makes errors at a higher rate

Djokovic's baseline play is impressive and seamless in its blend of attack and defence. He's about as solid as Federer, playing more aggressively and hits a deep, flat regulation ball. Occasionally, he lets loose with a winner from a standard position. Otherwise, he generally bosses Federer around from the baseline. The one kink in his performance is the kill shot... baseline points which Djoko controls end fairly frequently with Djoko making an attacking error. You could say Fed out-defends him, but I would mainly discredit Djoko's point termination than credit Fed's defense for this. Point contruction very good, the finishing... could be improved on

One can see just how seamless Djoko's game is when Fed reverts to attacking late in the match. The difference in Fed attacking and Fed playing not-attacking is as though its two different players on show. Djoko by contrast, always looks the same player - in control, usually commanding and transitioning from that base level to attacking or defending

I like Federer looking to come to net to give himself the attacking edge he's missing otherwise missing, but not impressed with his volleying. Winning 62% at net is a good outcome, but the bulk of the points won are due to strong approaches (including the serve) or 'insurance policy' type approaches. When he actually has to make the volley, there's plenty of room for improvement. Federer's puts away easy volleys but anything less than that he tends not to hit deep or place well. Djokovic rarely has to move much to get to the ball and try for a pass. Beyond this match, this is also true.... Fed has great touch at net (drop, stop volleys) but the regular volleys usually aren't great

Djokovic also passes extremely well. Apparently Fed can't read the pass... several times he's as stone as the ball sails by for a winner. He doesn't guess, he waits for the shot and tries to react to it... but Djoko's passes are too powerful for that - and he's equally comfortable going cross court or down the line. This is helped by Fed getting a bit too close to the net... probably to cut down the target Djoko can hit into. Worth a shot, but Djoko's threading needles with the pass

Djoko himself comes forward a bit. Being so much the better player from the back, he doesn't need to... but its a good option to have. He comes in after pushing Fed back baseline-to-baseline and finishes points nicely. At least once, he comes in to a floating return to dispatch a swinging FHV volley.... also a good move to have up one's sleeve against Federer, who tends to slice BH returns

No break points in the first set going into the tiebreak, though its Djoko who threatens on return more. He has the first set point, courtesy of a bad Federer FH error, but the Swiss erases it by forcing an error with a strong FH inside-in. He has the second one too, which is aced away. Fed converts on his first set point, a Djoko BH dtl UE

Second set, Djoko breaks early in a well played game, wrapping up with BH cc pass and hold fairly comfortably. He has a small hiccup serving out the set - back to back winner attempt errors gives Fed his first break point. Djoko deals with a third ball FH inside-out winner, hits an ace next point and wraps up with an OH

Easy holds til the end in the 3rd, when Fed saves 2 break points with unreturned first serves. Djokovic calmly placing a BH inside-out passing winner gives puts his nose in front in the tiebreak, Fed regains it in a curious umpiring situation. A Fed ball lands near enough to the line and is called out as Djokovic misses the shot and also signalling the ball was out. Federer's challenge reveals the ball caught the line and the point is awarded to him. The umpire explains to Djokovic that the call was late and didn't effect his shot (not true). Djokovic did indicate the ball was out as soon as he played the shot... but still, the call did coincide with his shot. Point should have been replayed as it can't be known that Djokovic would have challenged the ball had it been called good. As Djoko wins the set, it ends up not mattering

A rattled Federer flagrantly tanks the opening game of the 4th set and starts playing more aggressively. Seems to be in a desperate, anguished rather than well thought out way. Whatever the case, it breaks the grooved feel of play. Djokovic breaks with Fed unnecessarily trying to runaround a BH, but breaks right back with strong attacking play. Djoko makes it 3 breaks in a row to lead 5-2... and that's the last game he wins in the set. Fed's raised aggression and possibly a more vocal crowd has got to him and his level drops

Its 3-3 in the third, with Fed having held to love 3 times when the Swiss has the first break point in the decider. A bold Djokovic outplays him from the back and comes to net to force an error and goes on to hold. Game 8 is a struggle. Djokovic has 3 break points and all require Fed to forcefully end points. On the third, he serve-volleys off a second serve and manages to make a difficult FH1/2V first up before winning a net to net battle.

Match ends with a whimper when Djokovic breaks in the next Fed service game, with the Swiss making 3 routine UEs and a mildly forced FH error to give up the break and the match

Summing up, Djokovic's powerful and deep returning is the highlight of the match. His ground game too is impressive in how commanding and balanced it is, though finishing touch isn't always there. Federer serves very well, but is outgunned on all other fronts as he tones down the aggression. Does well to take it to 5... this could easily have been a straight setter
 

UnderratedSlam

Hall of Fame
2014. Djokovic was the better player and should have won in 4 sets. He was very tense however. RF couldn´t capitalize. RF could have won it like Novak did in 2019, but winning after defending a MP.

2015. Djokovic was even better than in 2014 and should have won in 3 sets. The beginning of the Novak Slam.

2019. Federer was the better player and should have won in... Just should have won, probably in 4. Amazingly, he let it go to 5 and then actually lost the match. A historical match.

USO 2007: Novak had set points in both opening tie-breaks, hence could have potentially won this duel already during his embryo stage but for the lack of experience and not enough coinfidence. RF won his next two semis vs Novak, then things went South with 3 defeats at USO in a row, one worse than the other.

USO 2015: Very equal match in which a few points decided the match. Again Novak proved to be more clutch.
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
What version of Djokovic do you think was better? 2014 Wimbledon final or Wimbeldon 2018 SF?
both good showings - particularly difficult to compare because of different types let alone levels, of competition

I can say Djok gets the better of Federer here - he's in command off the baseline

2018, its a dog fight from the back. Nadal probably having the edge

But Nadal tougher than Federer from the back

If I had to pick, I'd probably go with the '18 showing being better because there is that kink of losing a bunch of points when in command here. If he'd done that against Nadal, he'd probably have lost since getting control in the first place was harder
 

ReeceSachs

Hall of Fame
both good showings - particularly difficult to compare because of different types let alone levels, of competition

I can say Djok gets the better of Federer here - he's in command off the baseline

2018, its a dog fight from the back. Nadal probably having the edge

But Nadal tougher than Federer from the back

If I had to pick, I'd probably go with the '18 showing being better because there is that kink of losing a bunch of points when in command here. If he'd done that against Nadal, he'd probably have lost since getting control in the first place was harder
I don’t think both quite touch the Wimbledon 15 final vs Federer though.
 

ForehandRF

Professional
It's this match that helped Djokovic to take control in the rivalry and enter in Fed's head.Before this, after losses in slams, Fed still bounced back and beat Novak.
 

xFedal

Legend
It's this match that helped Djokovic to take control in the rivalry and enter in Fed's head.Before this, after losses in slams, Fed still bounced back and beat Novak.
If you beat someone in their pet slam I.e Nole beating Fed 2014 Wimby final... you enter their mind in the best way ?
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
It's this match that helped Djokovic to take control in the rivalry and enter in Fed's head.Before this, after losses in slams, Fed still bounced back and beat Novak.
It was a turning point for sure

Djoko had lost 4 of his last 5 Slam finals as well as a couple of de facto type semi's to Nadal and Federer going into this match. After it, he won 5 of the next 6

Prior to it, he couldn't get a firm grip as the top dog of the game. After it, he was undisputed top dog for couple years (Nadal's form failing probably had a hand in that)

Going into this match, prospects would have been about 50-50. By next year, Djokovic would be a firm favourite

I don’t think both quite touch the Wimbledon 15 final vs Federer though.
that's my memory too, but I'd like to have another look. unfortunately, that one isn't online in full

I remember a flurry of returns landing on the baseline. There's quite a few in this match, but that's not how I remembered the match prior to rewatching it

Remarkable player Djokovic. He has matches where he's hitting more winners than Federer and others where he's got fewer unforced errors than Nadal

Purely from an aesthetic perspective, I'd have liked to see him let loose offensively more often. He tends to get stuck in his mechanical, efficient game

Not that there's anything wrong with that from a winning/losing perspective (in fact, its normal). Everyone gets stuck in their styles... Federer losing by being too attacking and making too many errors, Nadal losing by being too passive and allowing himself to be dictated to etc.... Djoko's probably the most balanced of the 3

1 little mental kink in him. If he's getting outhit by Roger Federer (whose shadow he developed under), he tends to go react with heightened aggresion. And it usually comes off
But when he's getting outhit by Stan Wawrinka (who developed under his shadow), he tends to go into his shell. Still usually comes off... but when it hasn't, its cost him at least 2 Slams
 

Sudacafan

G.O.A.T.
Novak Djokovic beat Roger Federer 6-7(7), 6-4, 7-6(4), 5-7, 6-4 in the Wimbledon final, 2014 on grass

It was Djokovic's 2nd Wimbledon title while Federer had been aiming for a record breaking 8th title and playing in a record extending 9th final

Djokovic won 186 points, Federer 180

Serve Stats
Djokovic...
- 1st serve percentage (108/174) 62%
- 1st serve points won (79/108) 73%
- 2nd serve points won (43/66) 65%
- Aces 13, Service Winners 4
- Double Faults 3
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (56/174) 32%

Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (133/192) 69%
- 1st serve points won (102/133) 77%
- 2nd serve points won (26/59) 44%
- Aces 29, Service Winners 4
- Double Faults 5
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (67/192) 35%

Serve Pattern
Djokovic served...
- to FH 36%
- to BH 60%
- to Body 4%

Federer served...
- to FH 53%
- to BH 45%
- to Body 2%

Return Stats
Djokovic made...
- 120 (58 FH, 62 BH), including 1 return-approach
- 5 Winners (2 FH, 3 BH)
- 34 Errors, comprising...
- 4 Unforced (3 FH, 1 BH)
- 30 Forced (21 FH, 9 BH)
- Return Rate (120/187) 64%

Federer made...
- 115 (39 FH, 76 BH), including 4 runaround FHs and 7 return-approaches
- 1 Winner (1 FH)
- 39 Errors, comprising...
- 15 Unforced (7 FH, 8 BH), including 1 runaround FH & 2 return-approach attempts
- 24 Forced (13 FH, 11 BH)
- Return Rate (115/171) 67%

Break Points
Djokovic 4/15 (8 games)
Federer 3/7 (5 games)

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Djokovic 48 (24 FH, 16 BH, 3 FHV, 3 BHV, 2 OH)
Federer 42 (19 FH, 3 BH, 7 FHV, 5 BHV, 1 BH1/2V, 6 OH, 1 BHOH)

Djokovic's FHs - 9 cc (2 passes), 4 dtl (3 passes - 2 of them returns), 6 inside-out, 2 inside-in and 3 at net
- BHs - 4 regular, 12 passes
- regulars - 3 dtl (1 return) and 1 inside-out return
- passes - 5 cc, 4 dtl and 3 inside-out (1 return)

- 1 FHV was a swinging shot from behind the service line and has not been counted a net point. 1 BHV was a drop

Federer's FHs - 8 cc, 2 dtl (1 return and the other when Djokovic fell), 4 inside-out, 1 inside-in, 2 longline and 2 drop shots
- BHs - 1 cc and 1 dtl pass

- 8 from serve-volley points
- 3 first 'volleys' (1 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 BH drop shot at net)
- 5 second volleys (1 FHV, 3 OH, 1 BHOH)

- other 'volleys' include -
- FHVs - 1 stop and 1 swinging
- BHVs - 2 drops
- BH1/2V was played net to net

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Djokovic 68
- 37 Unforced (21 FH, 15 BH, 1 BHV)
- 31 Forced (14 FH, 15 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 49.2

Federer 77
- 39 Unforced (16 FH, 18 BH, 3 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 OH)
- 38 Forced (22 FH, 14 BH, 1 FHV, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 43.6

(Note 1: all half-volleys refer to such shots played at net. Half -volleys played from other parts of the court are included within relevant groundstroke counts)

(Note 2: The 'Unforced Error Forcefulness Index is a measure of how aggressive of intent the average UE made was. 60 is maximum, 20 is minimum. This match has been scored using a four point scale - 2 defensive, 4 neutral, 5 attacking, 6 winner attempt)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Djokovic was...
- 22/29 (76%) at net, including...
- 3/4 (75%) serve-volleying, all first serves
---
- 1/1 return-approaching
- 0/1 forced back

Federer was...
- 40/65 (62%) at net, including...
- 16/22 (73%) serve-volleying, comprising..
- 13/19 (68%) off 1st serve and...
- 3/3 off 2nd serve
---
- 1/7 (14%) return-approaching
- 0/2 forced back

Match Report
One sided match for a five setter, with Djokovic significantly superior in all areas save the serve. Some credit for playing smart to make it as competitive as it was - and a lot more to Djokovic for being so much better

Federer has a thin lead in unreturned serves (35% to 32%) and a significant one on the first serve (69% in to 62%... 77% won to 73%). That's about it. Djokovic returns better (4 UEs to 15 for Fed) and plays a lot better (+6 on winners, - 2 on unforced errors and -7 on forced errors for an overall lead of +15 points). Serve aside, most of the action looks a mismatch. And atypical of the match up - Federer is a lot more passive than usual (smartly, I think)

Serve & Return
Naturally, Federer has the stronger serve. He bangs down unreturnable serves throughout the match - the small matter of 29 aces and 4 service winners. Djokovic also serves well
Almost as naturally, Djokovic has the stronger return. Note the 5 winners (Fed has 1). Federer... does not return well

What is unusual is Djokovic coming up ahead in the overall serve-return complex. When 1 player is the better server and the other the better returner, this is almost never the case on grass

For starters, Djokovic does fairly well to keep Fed down to 'just' 32% unreturned serves and Fed could do much better than allow Djok 32% unreturned serves

Second, a remarkably high number of Djokovic returns land on the baseline and force Fed to hit 3rd ball 1/2volleys, not just neutralizing the servers advantage but taking it for himself (or winning the point outright by forcing errors). How someone can hit the baseline that often without hitting a boatload of errors just long, I don't know... remarkable returning from Djok. And they're good, flat returns too, not loopy

Third, most of Fed's 'returnable' first serves get returned - with the odd one being hit to the baseline to boot. Solid and penetrating stuff on the return from Djok

Federer by contrast... misses makeable first serves (a couple have even been marked unforced, whereas a couple of his second serves drew forced errors.... such is the difference in the quality of the two players serves) and makes a hash of many a second serve return. And generally, isn't threatening with the return shot

Fed does throw in chip-charge returns. They are among the worst I've seen. Not so much chips as lofting the ball over as he takes the net, he manages to get them to the Djoko BH (which is his design), but leaves the Serb with time to position himself and line up the shot. Credit to Djoko for passing well - it is a pressure ploy, even with time to ready the shot - but not good approaches. Fed is 1/7 return-approaching (and makes 2 errors trying)

Clear also is Djoko reading Fed' serve better than the other way round. Djoko seemingly reads and moves towards Fed's wider serves to get into position and shows quick footwork to do so. Fed doesn't seem to read Djoko's serve and is sometimes lead footed in coping with wide serves, even second ones

Fed uses his head well. He distributes serves slightly more to the BH for the first half of the match. Against a returner like Djokovic, who seems to be equally good off both wings, this is the best starting point. Noticing the greater success he's having to the FH, Fed serves more to that side in the second half. Look at the numbers - 53% to FH, 45% to BH.... but forcing 21 FH errors, to 9 BH (and 3 FH UEs to 1 BH too)

Play - Baseline & Net
A good indicator of how players stack up is 2nd serve points won. Djoko wins 65% of his, Fed just 44%. The second figure is a bit confounded by Djoko's returning frequently not making rallying an equal starting point, but the first is a good indicator of the Serb's superiority in play

The unusual aspect of this match is that Federer is passive by his standards. 'Passive' in the general sense is too strong a word.... 'not attacking' might be the best way to put it

Note Djoko with 48 winners to Fed's 42 and forcing 38 errors to Fed's 31. Even more telling is Djoko's very high 49.2 UEFI and Fed's low 43.6... in matches between the two, you'd usually see these figures reversed

So what does a "passive" Roger Federer look like? He's not trying to lash winners with the FH or open the court wide open with the BH. You could say he's trying to push Djokovic on the defensive with moderately attacking shots when he's in a position to take the initiative. So many times I've seen Federer lose by making too many unforced errors going for outright winners... here, he's playing higher percentage attacking tennis. If he needs an extra attacking edge, he comes to net to finish points rather than go for the winner from the back

Ploy works well enough. Its still a tough task due to Djokovic's strong defence. It takes a stronger shot to force an error out of Djokovic than it does Federer.... this difference is one of the factors in Djoko's advantage in forcing errors and its an extension of Djokovic being more solid off the ground in general. The Serb doesn't miss many routine balls (one of the reasons for his high UEFI), Fed misses a fair few
Reported for cruelty.
 

ScottleeSV

Professional
Would hardly say it was one sided. Federer was basically one break point conversion away from winning the match at 3-3 in the 5th set.

No arguments with Djoko winning though. He was just entering that crazy good phase that would last 2 years. I thought Federer played a great final really. Just fell slightly short.
 
Would hardly say it was one sided. Federer was basically one break point conversion away from winning the match at 3-3 in the 5th set.
That's the point. Djokovic was clearly the better player statistically, Federer was clutch to push it as far as he did (in sharp contrast to the 2019 final, ewgh) and even have a real chance as you mentioned.
 

Sudacafan

G.O.A.T.
Would hardly say it was one sided. Federer was basically one break point conversion away from winning the match at 3-3 in the 5th set.

No arguments with Djoko winning though. He was just entering that crazy good phase that would last 2 years. I thought Federer played a great final really. Just fell slightly short.
For Fed, the success chances while being one break point conversion away are similar to any other player trailing by 2 service games broken at the end of a set.
 
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