Match Stats/Report - Federer vs Philippoussis, Wimbledon final, 2003

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Roger Federer beat Mark Philippoussis 7-6(5), 6-2, 7-6(3) in the Wimbledon final, 2003 on grass

It was Federer' first Slam title and the first time he'd been as far as the semi-finals. He would go onto win the next 4 Wimbledons and reach the final of the next 6. Philippoussis was unseeded and playing his second and last Slam final

Federer won 108 points, Philippoussis 87

Philippoussis serve-volleyed off all serves. Federer serve-volleyed off all but 4 first serves

Serve Stats
Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (53/93) 57%
- 1st serve points won (47/53) 89%
- 2nd serve points won (27/40) 68%
- Aces 21 (1 second serve)
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (44/93) 47%

Philippoussis...
- 1st serve percentage (70/102) 69%
- 1st serve points won (54/70) 77%
- 2nd serve points won (14/32) 44%
- Aces 15 (1 second serve, 1 not clean), Service Winners 6
- Double Faults 4
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (50/102) 49%

Serve Pattern
Federer served...
- to FH 37%
- to BH 56%
- to Body 7%

Philippoussis served...
- to FH 48%
- to BH 49%
- to Body 3%

Return Stats
Federer made...
- 48 (22 FH, 26 BH)
- 6 Winners (2 FH, 4 BH)
- 29 Errors, all forced...
- 29 Forced (13 FH, 16 BH)
- Return Rate (48/98) 49%

Philippoussis made...
- 47 (15 FH, 32 BH), including 3 return-approaches
- 1 Winner (1 FH)
- 23 Errors, comprising...
- 8 Unforced (3 FH, 5 BH), including 1 runaround FH & 2 return-approach attempts
- 15 Forced (6 FH, 9 BH)
- Return Rate (47/91) 52%

Break Points
Federer 2/5 (4 games)
Philippoussis 0

Winners (including returns, excluding aces)
Federer 29 (11 FH, 8 BH, 3 FHV, 4 BHV, 3 OH)
Philippoussis 15 (3 FH, 1 BH, 4 FHV, 5 BHV, 2 OH)

Federer had 10 from serve-volley points
- 5 first 'volleys' (1 FHV, 2 BHV, 1 OH, 1 FH at net)… the FH at net was a drop shot
- 4 second volleys (2 FHV, 1 BHV, 1 OH)
- 1 fifth volley (1 OH)

- 16 passes (8 FH, 7 BH, 1 BHV)
- FHs - 4 cc, 2 dtl (1 return), 1 inside-out and 1 inside-in return (Philippoussis slipped slightly on the point and was unable to reach the ball)
- BHs - 3 cc (1 return), 3 dtl (2 returns) and 1 inside-in return (which Philippoussis misjudged and left)
- BHV - was played from just inside baseline and not a net point for Federer

- FHs - 1 cc and 1 inside-in
- BH - 1 dtl

Philippoussis had 11 from serve-volley points
- 7 first 'volleys' (3 FHV, 2 BHV, 1 OH, 1 BH at net)
- 3 second volleys (1 FHV, 2 BHV)
- 1 third volley (1 BHV)

- FH passes - 1 cc (which almost hit Federer), 1 dtl return and 1 inside-out

Errors (excluding returns and serves)
Federer 20
- 8 Unforced (3 FH, 1 BH, 4 FHV)… 1 FHV was not a net shot
- 12 Forced (5 FH, 5 BH, 2 FHV)… with 1 FH at net
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 48.8

Philippoussis 31
- 17 Unforced (5 FH, 4 BH, 4 FHV, 4 BHV)… with 1 BH at net
- 14 Forced (3 FH, 5 BH, 3 FHV, 1 FH1/2V, 1 BHV)
Unforced Error Forcefulness Index 51.2

(Note 1: all half-volleys refer to such shots played at net. Half -volleys played from other parts of the court are included within relevant groundstroke counts)

(Note 2: The 'Unforced Error Forcefulness Index is a measure of how aggressive of intent the average UE made was. 60 is maximum, 20 is minimum. This match has been scored using a four point scale - 2 defensive, 4 neutral, 5 attacking, 6 winner attempt)

Net Points & Serve-Volley
Federer was...
- 29/39 (74%) at net, including...
- 27/35 (77%) serve-volleying, comprising...
- 24/29 (83%) off 1st serve and...
- 3/6 (50%) off 2nd serve

Philippoussis was...
- 51/84 (61%) at net, including...
- 48/78 (62%) serve-volleying, comprising...
- 35/51 (69%) off 1st serve and...
- 13/27 (48%) off 2nd serve
---
- 1/3 (33%) return-approaching
- 1/3 (33%) retreated

Match Report
Near flawless from Federer, who is at his silky best in his first Slam final. The returning in particular stand out for quality and is the only thing that is done against strong opposition. 'Scud' Philippoussis, it has to be said, doesn't do anything other than serve particularly well

He does however, serve up an absolute storm. 69% first serves in, while bombing down first serves is very impressive. The second serve for that matter, would make decent first serves by a general standard. And he comes in behind every serve. In this light, 49% unreturned serves is not only understandable, but probably, lower than what one might expect

Its kept that low by Federer's outstanding returning. He apparently reads the serve well, and doesn't seem to be caught out by direction. Nothing to be done against the 15 aces and 6 service winners - they're about as unreturnable as can be. But Fed does well with the rest, getting balls back quite firmly, if not devastatingly. Occasionally just blocking ball back (at Scud's pace, and with Fed's timing, these aren't easy to pick off) and usually having a decent but compact swing at the ball

The volleys Fed's returns leave Scud are best described as 'not easy'. Against serve of this strength, that's a feat. Usually, you see servers like Scud be left with a ton of putaway first volleys. Not here

Still, would have to say, Scud doesn't volley particularly well. his 9 forecourt UEs are on the hard side but his 5 FEs are on the easy side. Not many super powerful shots to the feet, not many easy floaters.... everything seems to be firm and at decent net height. He tends not to kill points outright with volley and leaves Fed chances to make a pass, on top of missing makeable, though rarely easy, volleys

Fed's passing is good. The winners are mostly very cleanly hit, leaving Scud no chance. Otherwise, he puts the ball in play firmly... again, leaving Scud with 'not easy' (as opposed to 'hard') volleys. Its sound play, especially when up against a iffy volleyer

Fed serves up a storm of his own, with 21 aces. His out-acing Scud is largely due to his ability to get racquet on unreturnable serves (note Scud's high 6 service winners. Fed has 0) and he just trails unreturned serves 47% to Scud's 49%

While serving very well, the numbers are a tad flattering to Fed, and to an extent due to Scud not returning too well. Note 8 return UEs from Scud (including against a first serve Fed stayed back on). Misses a few other makeable returns.

Decent second serving from Fed, but its a good step down from Scud's. Fed's are good in that they are not easy to attack. Scud's are a step above - a decent weapon. The slack (Fed wins 68% second serve points, Scud 44%) is due to Fed's vastly superior returning

The returns Scud makes tend to leave Fed comfortable volleys. Fed doesn't volley into corners, but usually away from Scud, who's also not too great on the pass. The best part of Fed's net game is his coverage. He blankets the net and is quick to move side to side. Makes a good number of volleys of Scud's better placed passes

As a serve-volleyer, Fed looks classical of form. Strong as his serve is, it isn't so strong that returns reach him before he can close in on net (a common problem for very big servers). Comparing him to two of his own idols - Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg

Becker's serve tended to be so overpowering that returns that came back reached before he was at net. Edberg's was slower and he could get up to net, but got passed a fair bit and didn't get as many cheap points via unreturned serves. Fed in this match is somewhere in between - a very nice combo of effective and aesthetically pleasing

With Fed staying back on almost all second serves, there's some baseline play to be seen. Nothing to eventful... Scud is aggressor but tends to make UEs, and Fed is able to defend and put back in play the odd attacking groundstroke that lands in. Not good from the baseline from Scud, and Fed's ability to shine is very limited as a result
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Match Progression
Match starts as it does not continue. In the first game, Scud blasts a FH inside-out pass winner. Few points later, he doubly blasts a FH cc pass, that almost hits Federer, who has no time to make a shot. And Fed serve-volleys off 2/3 second serves and his a BH dtl winner baseline-to-baseline

For rest of match, Scud would hit 0 passing winners in play (he does have 1 return), Fed would serve-volley off second serve just 4 more times and hit just 1 more baseline-to-baseline winner (he hit one other on top of that from just behind service line, which is technically a baseline point)

The first set is the highest quality. Both players hold serve comfortably, there are no break points and just one game goes to deuce. Fed holds more comfortably, but there's little in it

Scud mini-breaks to start tiebreak with a chip-charge return, but next point, just misses a regulation volley to restore parity. There are a few potentially important points that follow. A long baseline rally develops at 2-2 with players swapping attacker and defender roles, which Fed ends with a perfect FH inside-in winner into and out of the corner of the court. Scud just misses a FH pass to go down 4-5, and then double faults. Down set point, Scud runsaround BH to swipe an attacking FH return that lands well out to give Fed the first set

Fed races out to 4-0 lead in second set. First break comes through back-to-back FH cc passing winners and 2 other strong passes that force makeable volley errors. Second break has 2 more Fed passing winners - 1 a BH dtl return the other, a creative BHV from just inside the baseline. No problems for Fed to serve out the set

Fed has an early break point in set 3, on which Scud's second serve is called out, but umpire overrules to make it an ace. Good call - ball was dead on the line. Scud takes Fed to deuce for the only time in the match in game after. In it, Fed misses a third ball FHV from near the baseline

Scud at his best on second serve in the match in this set. In first two sets, he'd won 5/17. In third, its 9/15

Fed has 2 more break points in game 11. On second one, he guesses which way Scud will hit his third ball FH at net, rushes over and has good shot at FH dtl winner, but misses with Scud out of the picture. Has to be marked unforced error, but only because of the anticipation/guesswork that saw him in position to deal with the ball in first place. Game after, there's a prolonged rally between serve-volleying Fed and Scud on baseline that ends with a fifth 'volley' OH winner from the server.

No drama in the tiebreak. a confused Scud, uncertain to come forward and volley or hang back and hits groundstroke to a middling return, misses a BH to open the game. Fed hands back the mini-break when he can't make a above average powerful return. But Fed wins Scud's next 2 service points - the first when Scud slips slightly and can't intercept a slightly mishit return that lands in, the second when Scud misses a routine first volley. No hiccups as Fed wraps up on first match point by drawing a return error

Summing up, stylish and high quality from Fed, especially the returning. Monster serving from Philippoussis keeps him in the match, but in all other areas, he's not in Federer's league

Stats for '04 final between Federer and Andy Roddick - https://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/ind...derer-vs-roddick-wimbledon-final-2004.664538/
 

Drob

Professional
Philippoussis serve-volleyed off all serves. Federer serve-volleyed off all but 4 first serves

Serve Stats
Federer...
- 1st serve percentage (53/93) 57%
- 1st serve points won (47/53) 89%
- 2nd serve points won (27/40) 68%
- Aces 21 (1 second serve)
- Double Faults 2
- Unreturned Serve Percentage (44/93) 47%
Net Points & Serve-Volley
Federer was...
- 29/39 (74%) at net, including...
- 27/35 (77%) serve-volleying, comprising...
- 24/29 (83%) off 1st serve and...
- 3/6 (50%) off 2nd serve
Sounds likes 93 first serves. Sounds like 35 serve-volleys. Yet you say Roger serve-volleyed all but four time on first serve. Cany clarify? I haven't seen this match.
 
Sounds likes 93 first serves. Sounds like 35 serve-volleys. Yet you say Roger serve-volleyed all but four time on first serve. Cany clarify? I haven't seen this match.
Aces not counted as s&v points here.

53 first serves of 93 total
20 first serve aces
leaves 33 first serves the returner got his racquet on (whether he made the return or not)
Federer s&v'd on 29 of 33 non-ace first serves.
Stats work out nicely.

Generally, it's a popular idea to count net approaches, off the serve or otherwise, on condition that the player actually crosses the service line. I follow this distinction too. Evidently Federer's aces were powerful enough that he would see it early that Scud wasn't making a return, and stop his forward movement before he reached the service line.
 

duaneeo

Legend
It was Federer' first Slam title and the first time he'd been as far as the semi-finals. He would go onto win the next 4 Wimbledons and reach the final of the next 6.
In 2001 Roger made the QF of RG and Wimbledon, but didn't make it beyond the 4th round in his next 7 slam appearances. If "LostGens" had been a topic of discussion back then, Roger would've been mentioned often. Of course, he later would've proven many wrong.
 

NedStark

Semi-Pro
As a serve-volleyer, Fed looks classical of form. Strong as his serve is, it isn't so strong that returns reach him before he can close in on net (a common problem for very big servers). Comparing him to two of his own idols - Boris Becker and Stefan Edberg
Remind me of Stich serve. Stich could serve as big as Becker or Sampras, but he often did not went max speed.
 

Waspsting

Hall of Fame
Sounds likes 93 first serves. Sounds like 35 serve-volleys. Yet you say Roger serve-volleyed all but four time on first serve. Cany clarify? I haven't seen this match.
Octorok's explained it fully

Adding on a little to what he said, service winners also gets excluded from serve-volley and thus, net points

Personally, I try to minimize service winners. "Should have been an ace, returner did very well to get good racquet on it" is loosely my definition of service winner.

The idea behind excluding aces and service winners from net points is that whether the guy was at net or not is irrelevant... the approach shot would have finished the point anyway. Instead of moving to net, the server could have dropped his racquet and done a hand-stand - and the return still wasn't coming back. What does it matter if he was moving to net or not?

For more lenient judge of service winners, Fed's s/v points would go down

The theoretically perfect way to measure s/v point or not against an unreturned serve would be if one could perfectly assess if the return would have gone unreturned sans the servers forward movement. Which is of course, impossible

Obviously, some of the return errors drawn would have been drawn regardless of whether Fed was trying to come to net or not... but unless its an ace or a service winner, they all get credited as serve-volley and net points

Generally, it's a popular idea to count net approaches, off the serve or otherwise, on condition that the player actually crosses the service line. I follow this distinction too. Evidently Federer's aces were powerful enough that he would see it early that Scud wasn't making a return, and stop his forward movement before he reached the service line.
Been awhile since we talked methodology

Where serve-volley concerned, I look at the intent more than how far the servers got forward

Someone like Goran Ivanisevic is regularly about half way to service line when return is hit. You see players who aren't serve-volleying about that far in occasionally, which I don't mark serve-volley point because I don't think they're looking for a third ball volley

But if I see Goran is looking to serve-volley constantly, and he has a point where he's nowhere near service line, I'll still mark it s/v point

Do you mark approach shots that go for winners as net points if the guy has reached service line?

Remind me of Stich serve. Stich could serve as big as Becker or Sampras, but he often did not went max speed.
Of servers of that calibre, Stich has the most casual service action I've seen. Just tosses ball in air and hits it. To watch the motion, you might think he's just starting a casual warm up rally

Wawrinka's motion reminds me of him, though he's a lower calibre server
 
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