Matchplay - Scrub looking for some constructive feedback.

DynastyFury

New User
Match Link
I'm the one in the blue shirt.

Based on the first 5 minutes of this match video, I'm looking for some comments and feedback on my tennis.
I grew up a OHBH and switched to a THBH in the last year.
I'm running around my backhand pretty often, and my slot selection could probably use a ton of work.

Double fault a lot too.
 

pencilcheck

Hall of Fame
You might find that hitting during the day is completely different from hitting at night. During the day the less you hit through the better and the more you feel you use your legs the better
 

DynastyFury

New User
You might find that hitting during the day is completely different from hitting at night. During the day the less you hit through the better and the more you feel you use your legs the better

Thanks for the feedback.
Stamina has been an issue when using too much legs and cramping by my second match in a tournament.
I have been jogging to work on this issue.
 

RVT

Rookie
Match Link
I'm the one in the blue shirt.

Based on the first 5 minutes of this match video, I'm looking for some comments and feedback on my tennis.
I grew up a OHBH and switched to a THBH in the last year.
I'm running around my backhand pretty often, and my slot selection could probably use a ton of work.

Double fault a lot too.

for the most part, you hit the ball fine (except your second serve, which needs completely deconstructed). You don't really need to work on your strokes. You need to work on two things:

1) getting the ball in the same position (or as close as possible to it) relative to your body, every single time
2) doing the above as quickly as possible

It really is that simple. From the level you're at currently, to the top 10, the guy (or gal) who wins is the person who does the above better than the other person. If the ball is in your wheelhouse, you have no problem hitting it. It's not in your wheelhouse nearly enough, because your footwork is pretty poor. You're flat-footed too often, you're too late too often, and even when you're not rushed, you make yourself rushed by moving too late (against a guy who's not hitting very hard).

My advice: ignore anyone who starts talking about "wrist lag and windshield wipers" and any other nonsense, and focus 100% on your footwork. Or, 90% on your footwork and then the second serve.

1) get in better shape, doing some running--along with star drills, stairs and lines
2) do some tennis specific footwork drills (you can find plenty on-line)
3) when you play someone like the guy you're playing, make it a point to get to EVERY ball early, so you have plenty of time to set up and recover. I think because he's not hitting hard and pressing you, you're just being lazy. I get it. But one way I improved my footwork a lot is playing with folks like this and making it a point to be perfectly set, ALL the time. Make that the challenge vs. anything else. Against someone hitting with that pace, a ball should never be below your knees or above your chest.

In short, make sure all of your movements on the court are fast and deliberate--always. I realize none of this is exciting. But if you want to improve, this is what you need to do.
 

DynastyFury

New User
Actually you’ve got a pretty good game.

Regarding shot selection read up on Wardlaw’s directionals.


Thank you. I will check that out.



for the most part, you hit the ball fine (except your second serve, which needs completely deconstructed). You don't really need to work on your strokes. You need to work on two things:

1) getting the ball in the same position (or as close as possible to it) relative to your body, every single time
2) doing the above as quickly as possible

It really is that simple. From the level you're at currently, to the top 10, the guy (or gal) who wins is the person who does the above better than the other person. If the ball is in your wheelhouse, you have no problem hitting it. It's not in your wheelhouse nearly enough, because your footwork is pretty poor. You're flat-footed too often, you're too late too often, and even when you're not rushed, you make yourself rushed by moving too late (against a guy who's not hitting very hard).

My advice: ignore anyone who starts talking about "wrist lag and windshield wipers" and any other nonsense, and focus 100% on your footwork. Or, 90% on your footwork and then the second serve.

1) get in better shape, doing some running--along with star drills, stairs and lines
2) do some tennis specific footwork drills (you can find plenty on-line)
3) when you play someone like the guy you're playing, make it a point to get to EVERY ball early, so you have plenty of time to set up and recover. I think because he's not hitting hard and pressing you, you're just being lazy. I get it. But one way I improved my footwork a lot is playing with folks like this and making it a point to be perfectly set, ALL the time. Make that the challenge vs. anything else. Against someone hitting with that pace, a ball should never be below your knees or above your chest.

In short, make sure all of your movements on the court are fast and deliberate--always. I realize none of this is exciting. But if you want to improve, this is what you need to do.


Thank you for the analysis. Once you said "You're flat-footed too often...", I definitely felt like you shot three sharp truth arrows back-to-back straight to my soul. The truth does hurts sometimes haha.
I'll work on your three points of advice and report back in a couple months, hopefully with some progress.
 

Dartagnan64

G.O.A.T.
Not a lot of nuance to your game. 100% going to rip it no matter what. If I played you I'm totally going to just give you moon balls and slices and let you self destruct.

Tennis is about getting the ball into the court one more time than your opponent not about getting it past your opponent. Too many self inflicted wounds trying to hammer it by your opponent.

If you win with that strategy fine, but it you find you are losing matches due to UE's, it's time to re-evaluate the strategy. You've got a nice game but it might work better toned down to 80% than 100%.

I started scoring a lot better in golf when I realized it was a game of precision not power.
 

FiddlerDog

Hall of Fame
Thanks for posting.

I like your game.
What is your rating?

@RVT 's post about footwork and conditioning is the best post of the year.

Do not worry about match score or losing to bad players for the next year.
You have not reached your ceiling yet.

To get to the next level:

Start to be more mindful of recovering to center.

Move forward when you hit into the wide corners.
9:17

You need to drill approch shots for 5 lessons.
You will then have the right touch and feel.

I like how you take full swings with FH and BH.

Now do the same thing with 2nd serve.
Your 2nd serve doesn't fit your game style.
Great 1st serve, weak 2nd serve.

Keep developing your slice.

Stop backing up after you hit a dropshot
10:05

I like how you attack the weak serves, but you need to drill this to get the right balance.

Take 5 lessons. Split the lesson into 30 min approach shots and 30 min serve returns.
 
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FiddlerDog

Hall of Fame
My advice: ignore anyone who starts talking about "wrist lag and windshield wipers" and any other nonsense,

Also ignore any poster who starts posting time lapse photography for increasing your iso-pronation medial inertia lag force axis
or other gibberish like isometric distal pronation angle of bilateral medial circumduction anterior wrist axis flexion to get more spin
This is exclusively the domain of 3.5 and lower, and is not how any advanced player has ever learned tennis.
 

DynastyFury

New User
Thanks for posting.

I like your game.
What is your rating?

@RVT 's post about footwork and conditioning is the best post of the year.

Do not worry about match score or losing to bad players for the next year.
You have not reached your ceiling yet.

To get to the next level:

Start to be more mindful of recovering to center.

Move forward when you hit into the wide corners.
9:17

You need to drill approch shots for 5 lessons.
You will then have the right touch and feel.

I like how you take full swings with FH and BH.

Now do the same thing with 2nd serve.
Your 2nd serve doesn't fit your game style.
Great 1st serve, weak 2nd serve.

Keep developing your slice.

Stop backing up after you hit a dropshot
10:05

I like how you attack the weak serves, but you need to drill this to get the right balance.

Take 5 lessons. Split the lesson into 30 min approach shots and 30 min serve returns.


Thanks. I'm a old fart now and started to get back into tennis last year.
I didn't want to get into ratings because there's a lot of posters that I've seen that try to judge ratings based on strokes, pace, spin, etc... when to me, it's simply based on match results. Then there's insert unnecessary comments related to someone's rating.
I care about competitive matches and slowly working to the next level.
Thus, my reason for posting here was to receive feedback from the perspective of others especially from those with well-experienced eyes (as it's sometimes hard to judge oneself).

Since you asked:
For USTA, I'm waiting for my computer rating this December. I started at 3.5 self rating last year.
My USTA 3.5M 18&O singles tournament record:
2020: 10-7.​
2021: 17-16.​
My USTA 4.0 18&O singles tournament record:
2020: 2-6.​
2021: 0-1 (I don't count one win because first opponent straight up told me he was just managing his rating and then lost on purpose).​
The video you just saw was a recent 4.0 tournament.

For UTR, I have a 4.78 singles rating as of two days ago.
I just played an UTR event this past weekend and it was more enjoyable than the majority of USTA adults tournaments that I've played.
If I want to work on a grinding mentality, I feel like I should play a lot more UTR events.

Now as to your analysis, I do see your point on approach shots. I have been pretty uncomfortable approaching net and volleying/overhead.
The top of 3.5M/bottom of 4.0M seem to have that mid-court game down pretty good (at least the folks I have encountered).
I am going to focus on footwork/running per RVT above while keeping your advice in mind.
Thanks!!

Also ignore any poster who starts posting time lapse photography for increasing your iso-pronation medial inertia lag force axis
or other gibberish like isometric distal pronation angle of bilateral medial circumduction anterior wrist axis flexion to get more spin
This is exclusively the domain of 3.5 and lower, and is not how any advanced player has ever learned tennis.

I kinda zoned-out reading that... lol.
Thanks.
 
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FiddlerDog

Hall of Fame
Now as to your analysis, I do see your point on approach shots. I have been pretty uncomfortable approaching net and volleying/overhead.
The top of 3.5M/bottom of 4.0M seem to have that mid-court game down pretty good (at least the folks I have encountered).

Yes, I estimated your game as a pretty typical 3.5 who can hit a good ball but spews errors.
Did you notice that you hit harder than most of the 4.0s you lost you?

Keep hitting big, you've come a long way, farther than most, but to win, you also need to know when to dial it back.
Compare your perfect smooth serve return at 14:50 and 15:22 where you crush and spew an error.

Yes, one major difference in 3.5 to 4.0 is the offensive ability to put away an approach shot without trying to crush it for winner.
Some 3.5's hit the ball as hard as they can from mid court like a baseline shot. Just get it into play first.
Most people just rally all the time and don't really have the reps of mid court.

Your game is at a great place. Was a pleasure to watch your video.
I would also try to play more 4.0 players, where you will learn the importance of consistency.
Stay at 3.5 too long, and you will develop poor habits that allow you to win at 3.5, but does not translate to higher levels
 
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jdawgg

Semi-Pro
You're someone who could learn a lot from singles strategies.

What was your opponents strategy? Shot tolerance -- he was just trying to get one more ball in than you. He took little risk on his shots. He also moves you around a bit, albeit with not a lot of pace on his shots.

Your goal should be to better match his shot tolerance by hitting a better rally ball that is more consistent. Now use this rally ball to move him around and try to force errors. It looks like your current rally ball takes a lot of risk and winning matches will be predicated on that rally ball forcing errors on your opponent. This opponent is able to take a short backswing and block your ball back deep thus neutralizing it quite easily. I imagine other players with worse racquet prep will have a very hard time with your ball and it will force more errors.

Your goal shouldn't be to out shot tolerance this kind of defensive player. Rather find a way to force errors.

Singles matches at the ATP level are won by forced errors (IBM stat tracker showed 70% of points for Australian Open). This statistic will be even higher for rec matches. It's not about trying to hit winners, rather forcing errors.

How do you do that? Well there's a variety of ways. For me against an opponent like this I use a lot of the 2-1 strategy. I hit a high topspin ball deep to their backhand with a lot of margin. The goal is to hit a high quality, consistent ball that kicks up and pushes the opponent back. Then if I get a ball that lands service line or shorter I go angle shot to backhand (inside out forehand). This will stretch your opponent and because they're deep behind the baseline they will have to run a lot further to get this ball. Then, if they get that back, I go inside in forehand. Thus the 2-1. A lot of times the angle shot will elicit a forced error or you can just approach the net off it.

Another strategy against defensive players is to slice short and low at the service line CC. This pulls them forward but generally these players will backpedal and not approach the net off this ball. Your second shot will be a forehand deep to the other corner of the court. Rinse repeat.

I actually have a match I've been meaning to upload against a defensive player where I employ a lot of the 2-1 (NTRP 4.5/5.0 level). My volley and overhead left me that day but still managed to win 6-1, 6-4 because of using the 2-1 with my forehand to force errors. The key shot is really that mid court forehand (generally hitting the angle ball if your opponent is deep behind the baseline), that's the payoff shot you need to practice executing.
 

RVT

Rookie
Singles matches at the ATP level are won by forced errors (IBM stat tracker showed 70% of points for Australian Open). This statistic will be even higher for rec matches. It's not about trying to hit winners, rather forcing errors.

Strongly disagree with this statement. Look at the first 10 points. 8 pointed ended in unforced errors. 1 winner, 1 forced errors.

At this level, winning is about hitting back one more ball than the other guy. These matches are determined by unforced errors, not forced errors. Cut out the unforced errors first, then worry about strategy. You have to be able to just reliably hit every ball back cross-court or down the middle with reasonable depth before you need to worry about anything else, imo.
 

jdawgg

Semi-Pro
Strongly disagree with this statement. Look at the first 10 points. 8 pointed ended in unforced errors. 1 winner, 1 forced errors.

At this level, winning is about hitting back one more ball than the other guy. These matches are determined by unforced errors, not forced errors. Cut out the unforced errors first, then worry about strategy. You have to be able to just reliably hit every ball back cross-court or down the middle with reasonable depth before you need to worry about anything else, imo.

You might be right about it not being higher for rec matches, it would be interesting to see stats on certain levels 3.5/4.0/4.5/5.0. I suspect the higher you go the more that is won on forced errors. However, at OPs level it will not be all about "getting one more ball back". OP will not beat this guy by playing his opponents game and trying to out shot tolerance a defensive opponent. Hitting every ball deep down the middle his opponent will just bunt it back deep and he's expending less energy (and more practiced at it), not a good plan at all. Points should be built and errors should be forced. This will also help OP progress to 4.0 and beyond.

Let's look at the first set stats shall we:


OP or Ken wins 43% of his points by forcing an opponents error and wins only 11% of his points by getting his opponent to make an unforced error. He actually wins 26% of his points on winners.

OPs opponent, Pedro, wins 39% of his points by forcing an error and wins 43% of his points by getting his opponent to make an unforced error. Only 11% of his points are won by winners.

In my scoring of errors I was quite generous with UEs vs FE for Ken. Pedro hits a lot of balls that challenge Kens low forehand and forward movement, I scored these as UEs but maybe they are forced errors (FE).

The takeaway? Well first, most points were won on forced errors so there you go (38 forced errors vs 25 unforced, you could say forced errors were more critical to this match than unforced). Second, Ken's opponent makes very few unforced errors. Ken needs to "trade in" some of his unforced errors and turn them into forced errors. Not many because this set could be swayed by a few points -- 42 points won by Ken and 46 by Pedro.

How would Ken do this?

For cutting back unforced errors: like you said his spacing was bad on some shots (poor footwork). It appears windy this day and Ken makes too many mistakes on slow balls, it looks like he plants his feet and the wind shifts the ball slightly and he sails it. He especially should cut down his UEs on returning his opponents second serve. Keep the feet moving and hit a high quality ball deep down the middle at the weaker stroke (take the sidelines out of the equation, no more UEs from missing wide, and pressure the opponent with depth and ball quality). Ken should also lift his second serve returns more as he kept hitting them into the net (focusing on hitting deep or with more net clearance should help this).

For forcing more errors: Ken was more comfortable going crosscourt with his forehand but should look to do combos like the 2-1 more to pick on his opponents backhand with inside out forehands (strength to weakness). Deep to BH, angle to BH, inside in forehand. This could generate a lot more forced errors. The other strategy of hitting short CC then deep to the other side is a great way to force errors against players who aren't comfortable approaching the net. There's a lot of different ways to open up the court and get the opponent on the run. At the net he hit a lot of balls well but right back to his opponent, usually a consequence of only practicing volleys in warmups (you warmup volley down the middle back to your opponent, I've had this problem before). Practice hitting volleys to big targets that are not in the middle of the court (drill them).

In conclusion, if Ken wants to progress to 4.0 and above, he should focus on trading in his unforced errors for some more forced errors. Utilizing better footwork and hitting a more consistent rally ball to cut down his unforced errors and utilizing better strategies to generate more forced errors.
 
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jdawgg

Semi-Pro
I was curious about the distinction between forced and unforced errors and I think I missed a decent amount of forced errors, especially ones that Pedro generated by slicing low to Ken's forehand.

Based on this:

"Errors are forced when the player is made to hit on the run or opponent has put enough pace/depth/spin or the bounce is uncomfortable (low volley or high FH to the BH) or any combination of the above.
The other factor is the opponent is at the net thus putting pressure on the player for the pass or the lob. This is a forced error most of the times, if not all. "

This definition is also not based on player ability at all. If you think about the playsight court the errors are generated based on an algorithm which doesn't take into account player ability.
 

RVT

Rookie
I was curious about the distinction between forced and unforced errors and I think I missed a decent amount of forced errors, especially ones that Pedro generated by slicing low to Ken's forehand.

Based on this:

"Errors are forced when the player is made to hit on the run or opponent has put enough pace/depth/spin or the bounce is uncomfortable (low volley or high FH to the BH) or any combination of the above.
The other factor is the opponent is at the net thus putting pressure on the player for the pass or the lob. This is a forced error most of the times, if not all. "

This definition is also not based on player ability at all. If you think about the playsight court the errors are generated based on an algorithm which doesn't take into account player ability.

I think this may be part of the issue. I'm going on the eye test (and having matches charted for me in college years). I'm not seeing anywhere near that level of forced errors. While I'm seeing (from both players) are just a ton of missed rally balls. Just going back to the original matched posted, in looking at the first 10 points I'm seeing 8 of them decided by neutral balls being hit into the net or long.

I don't really disagree with any of the advice you've given, but before one gets to that point, one need to be able to 1) keep a basic rally ball in play, and 2) move well enough so that you're only hitting on the run when you actually need to be on the run. Which is why I stand by the original advice: just work on footwork first, and getting the ball back in play with reasonable depth and base. Once that is accomplished, then it's time to worry about strategy and pattern development. Walk before you can run.
 

jdawgg

Semi-Pro
I think this may be part of the issue. I'm going on the eye test (and having matches charted for me in college years). I'm not seeing anywhere near that level of forced errors. While I'm seeing (from both players) are just a ton of missed rally balls. Just going back to the original matched posted, in looking at the first 10 points I'm seeing 8 of them decided by neutral balls being hit into the net or long.

I don't really disagree with any of the advice you've given, but before one gets to that point, one need to be able to 1) keep a basic rally ball in play, and 2) move well enough so that you're only hitting on the run when you actually need to be on the run. Which is why I stand by the original advice: just work on footwork first, and getting the ball back in play with reasonable depth and base. Once that is accomplished, then it's time to worry about strategy and pattern development. Walk before you can run.

I went by the eye test for the stats I did. I think as a UTR 9.6 player (NTRP 5.0), former college tennis player and coach I have enough experience to do that. I suspected I was being a bit generous with not handing out some forced errors and found that quote from a match charting statistician after I did the stats for this match. There's other quotes from the TENNIS magazine (ATP stats guys) and such that I could share as well that are similar.

For the first eight points:

1: Deep on the run BH --> had this as UE but now I'm thinking its Forced (a bit of a toss up on this one)
2: UE forehand
3: UE forehand
4: Forced error, very difficult on the run forehand
5: Forced error, Ken hits a deep forehand approach to Pedros backhand and he sails a slice lob deep (ball quality and coming to the net put a lot of pressure on Pedro)
6: UE Forehand
7: Forced error, Ken paints the outside line with a "big" serve out wide
8: winner FH

4 forced errors and 5 unforced, I had the first one as an unforced in my stats, but its a toss up on that one, Ken had to move a decent ways and his opponent hits a deep flat fh and he has to hit a somewhat on the run backhand on a ball that has pace and depth.

I've taken enough video of NTRP 4.5 and 5.0 video to know how much it slows down what these shots look like on video. There's a lot of forcing shots that look not forcing on video. The first point would be a good example. The ATP stats guys also say that first serve returns are almost always forced errors and second serves are almost always unforced (I did all second serve returns missed as unforced and a lot of first serves for pedro I didn't count as forced).

You also can't say... well if this guy was faster he wouldn't have to hit it on the run therefore it's not a UE. They're just not charted that way (way too subjective and actual statisticians do this stuff).

The more that I watched of this first set the more I realized how close Ken came to winning it. If he had only made more second serve returns by aiming middle and hitting a high net clearance, deep quality ball I think he wins the first set 6-4.

I get what you're saying (and it's quality advice, this guys footwork, fitness and spacing all need work) but I'm not sure our priorities are the same: I have a bit of a different philosophy these days. If this guy goes out and changes his strategies -- use the 2-1, use the up and back, use the neutralize first serve and for second serves eliminate errors by hitting deep quality balls down the middle to challenge his opponents timing, then he wins the match or splits sets next time he plays this guy without working on his footwork at all. How powerful is that? We know the first set was won based on only a few points.

I've realized having specific strategies cuts down on a lot of indecision type errors. Some of those second serve returns could be chalked up to thinking he should go for winners, a strategy change of simply trying to force errors with a quality deep ball down the middle cuts down on a lot of errors. Also when you tell people to cut down on their unforced errors at this level they start hitting it too slow and end up making an unforced error anyway or better yet giving their opponent a short ball that generates a forced error. Better to tell them, hit a 60% pace ball deep with good spin to the BH, when short go for the angle shot 60% pace, if they get that then go inside-in forehand 80% pace to the open court (this is where injecting pace actually helps).
 

FiddlerDog

Hall of Fame
great analysis by @jdawgg. Was that an app you used to display the summary data?

I agree with jdawg's sentiment. To get to 4.0, a 3.5 should not try to learn pusher game and play down to his opponents inferior strokes.
He just needs to know how to hit a more neutral rally ball, and not always gun for winners. And he needs to clean up approach shots and volleys.
 

jdawgg

Semi-Pro
great analysis by @jdawgg. Was that an app you used to display the summary data?

I agree with jdawg's sentiment. To get to 4.0, a 3.5 should not try to learn pusher game and play down to his opponents inferior strokes.
He just needs to know how to hit a more neutral rally ball, and not always gun for winners. And he needs to clean up approach shots and volleys.

Ya, the app is MatchTrack
 

DynastyFury

New User
Wow, I didn't expect someone to watch my entire first set and log it point by point.
Awesome analysis @jdawgg.

The reason I am taking too long to respond here is because @RVT and jdawgg are making great points.
It’s taking me some time to digest the great advice from both of y'all.

While I work on my footwork, I am keen to take jdawgg advice (in terms of a preset strategy) into a 3.5M singles tournament that I signed up for this weekend.
I don't want to take shortcuts. Based on RVT's advice, I plan to slowly work on my footwork and spacing while also jogging more to build my stamina/endurance.

Thank you both.

Also, @FiddlerDog, yes, I noticed that.
I also plan to hit up more UTRs and mix in some more 4.0s in the near future.
 

jdawgg

Semi-Pro
Wow, I didn't expect someone to watch my entire first set and log it point by point.
Awesome analysis @jdawgg.

The reason I am taking too long to respond here is because @RVT and jdawgg are making great points.
It’s taking me some time to digest the great advice from both of y'all.

While I work on my footwork, I am keen to take jdawgg advice (in terms of a preset strategy) into a 3.5M singles tournament that I signed up for this weekend.
I don't want to take shortcuts. Based on RVT's advice, I plan to slowly work on my footwork and spacing while also jogging more to build my stamina/endurance.

Thank you both.

Also, @FiddlerDog, yes, I noticed that.
I also plan to hit up more UTRs and mix in some more 4.0s in the near future.

You're welcome! That's good you're taking time to think about it. Good luck in your tournament let us know how it works out with the new strategies.

If you look at UEs you actually only made one on approach shots, so you're actually doing good there contrary to what others have said. It looks like you hit a lot of great angle shots to the forehand (your best shot imo). If you can start running around your backhand more (it helps to shade a little bit to the BH side, but thats more advanced, need to learn ideal recovery positions first, and should only be done when you hit a quality ball to their backhand basically daring them to hit DTL which is low %) and establish your inside out forehand to the opponents backhand you will force a lot more errors and generate more weaker shots. Even just sending more forehands to his backhand DTL when you have a ball that doesn't pull you too wide or have too much pace on it to change direction.

Here's your targets for the 2-1 (should be all forehands and where you hit them from can change but the targets on the other side of the court remain the same -- they're meant to be big targets so you can hit an aggressive quality rally ball and not worry about missing too much). The first shot is deep to BH or ad side, second shot angle to BH or ad side, third shot DTL to deuce side (if he gets it to your BH don't go for the DTL shot it's low percentage, only inside in forehands):


Improving your returning strategies and mindsets will help a lot as well (this was a big weakness for you against Pedro). If Pedro hit good pace to your forehand on his first serve you would rush your swing to get the racquet back and have to swing way too quickly resulting in blasting the ball way out. Think neutralize on that shot, if you have a the chip/slice forehand in your arsenal block it back with that deep, if your not comfortable with that then try to get your racquet back quicker on your forehand and just hit a smooth controlled swing aiming deep with high net clearance and slow pace. You wont have much time to practice that before the tournament so maybe just tell yourself neutralize before every first serve, it helps a lot to adopt that mindset.

For the second serve your mindset should be to hit a high quality deep ball three feet inside the service line (margin) to your opponents weaker stroke. Hitting a deep ball here to your opponent is incredibly difficult for them because they will just be coming out of their service motion when the ball is landing at their feet. This will generate forced errors and short balls. It will also take away the sidelines, meaning if you miss the shot you will really only miss it deep. So its a win-win (cuts back on UEs and gives you more FEs) and probably the strategy that will help you the most right away.
 
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