Mats Wilander: ‘Federer did not want a resounding loss to Djokovic before Wimbledon’

T007

Rookie
I actually think Fed believed he could beat Rafa this time at RG because he had a winning streak vs him and wanted to test it at RG, thats why he showed up
Yeah expected this from a salty hater like you. Federer never cared about losses and even if he lost he put up a brave fight. This time he was not prepared for a long run as it was too soon to reach that level where he can go toe to toe with the best for 4 hrs.
 

T007

Rookie
Many on TTW were claiming that it would be to Fed's advantage to get a preview look at Djoker in prep for Wimbledon. That makes sense. But Fed's big fat ego just could not bear the the thought of losing to Djoker.
Well you ask Djoker how big was his ego when he avoided Federer in 2017 wimbledon.
 
Wilander gonna Wilander. See the eyes of the defending champion when he loses at the second round


His last slam win came at the age of 24 when Novak started his reign

Here's from Mats' wikipedia article. Don't miss the drug test part :-D. This is some guy to get expert analysis from lol

1989–1996
Wilander's motivation, results, and ranking suffered in 1989. He lost in the second round of the Australian Open to Ramesh Krishnan, the quarterfinals of the French Open to Andrei Chesnokov, the quarterfinals of Wimbledon to John McEnroe (7–6, 3–6, 6–3, 6–4), and the second round of the US Open to Pete Sampras (5–7, 6–3, 1–6, 6–1, 6–4). He did not win a tournament during 1989 and he finished the year ranked World No. 12.

Wilander briefly moved back into the top 10 rankings on 12 February 1990, but by the end of the year, his ranking had slumped to World No. 41. He defeated Boris Becker in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, only to lose to Stefan Edberg in straight sets in the semifinals. He skipped the French Open and Wimbledon and lost in the first round of the US Open to Brad Gilbert.

Wilander played only the first half of 1991. He lost in the fourth round of the Australian Open and the second round of the French Open. He finished the year ranked World No. 159.

Wilander was absent from the tour in 1992. He played seven tournaments in 1993, losing in the first round of five of them. At the US Open, he lost in the third round to Cédric Pioline. He finished the year ranked World No. 330.

Except for Wimbledon, Wilander played a full schedule in 1994. He lost in the fourth round of the Australian Open to MaliVai Washington, the first round of the French Open to Andre Agassi (6–2, 7–5, 6–1), and the first round of the US Open to Guy Forget. His only victory over a top ten player was in the second round of the tournament in Indianapolis against Todd Martin. He finished the year ranked World No. 129.

Wilander's results improved slightly in 1995 as he finished the year ranked World No. 46. After losing in the first round of the Australian Open to Jacco Eltingh, he lost in the second round of the French Open to eighth ranked Wayne Ferreira 6–7, 7–6, 6–3, 6–7, 8–6. He then lost in the third round of Wimbledon to Eltingh and the second round of the US Open to Martin. In other tournaments, he had wins against tenth ranked Marc Rosset, eighth ranked Ferreira, and sixth ranked Yevgeny Kafelnikov. He also won his final tour match against Edberg, in the second round of the Canadian Open in Montreal.

In 1996, Wilander played only one Grand Slam tournament, losing in the second round of the French Open to Martin. He retired from the tour after losing his final match to Martin Damm in Beijing in October.

During most of his career, Wilander used the Rossignol F-200 Carbon tennis racquet, an early fiberglass model.

Failed drug test and suspension
During the 1995 French Open he and Karel Nováček tested positive for cocaine. They appealed the initial three-month suspension by the International Tennis Federation, claiming flawed test procedures but withdrew their appeals in May 1997 and on 15 May 1997 received a three-month suspension from the ATP Tour for failing a drugs test. Additionally Wilander had to return his prize money since May 1995, amounting to $289,005, and forfeit ranking points.[6][7]
Probably Federer's fault.
 

heninfan99

Talk Tennis Guru
I like Veelander but it is a little hypocritical to say Murray shouldnt be taking someones spot playing injured while it is okay for Fed to take someones spot (only to quit) who could use a decent payday.
 
If Roger is afraid of losing to Novak, wouldn’t explain their AO 2020 meeting. Similar circumstances then as well.

Simple answer is that RG moved back a week and Roger didn’t want to risk his knees too much after two consecutive 4 setters on clay before going to Halle.
So he didnt want to risk his knees, that's why he choose grass over clay when clay is easy on the knees than grass
You've been fill by the media with the whole "knees excuse" bs that you actualy think it's true or make sense.
Fed is a fame addict, he's looking for the tourney he's seen and worshiped as close to a divine.. Here why he tryhard for Wimbledon only.

Federer is a quitter. Nadal or Djo, he would get pounded.
 

alinefx

New User
Now I understand why so many think Wilander's mind is even weaker than his serve. I give him a counter-example:

'19 RG: Nadal beat Federer 63 64 62
'19 W: Federer beat Nadal 76 16 63 64
And this:

2012 FO Semi-final: Djoker beats Fed, loses to DEFENDING CHAMP Nadal in the final
2012 WC Semifinal: Fed takes out DEFENDING CHAMP Djoker and goes on to beat Murray, who beats Djoker the next year in the final as well.
 

Thetouch

Professional
Yeah I guess Mats should have said that Federer was going to win Paris but he didn't want to embarrass Novak on the way so he saved that 3 set victory for Wimbledon. Bad bad Mats.


Wilander gonna Wilander. See the eyes of the defending champion when he loses at the second round


His last slam win came at the age of 24 when Novak started his reign

Here's from Mats' wikipedia article. Don't miss the drug test part :-D. This is some guy to get expert analysis from lol

1989–1996
Wilander's motivation, results, and ranking suffered in 1989. He lost in the second round of the Australian Open to Ramesh Krishnan, the quarterfinals of the French Open to Andrei Chesnokov, the quarterfinals of Wimbledon to John McEnroe (7–6, 3–6, 6–3, 6–4), and the second round of the US Open to Pete Sampras (5–7, 6–3, 1–6, 6–1, 6–4). He did not win a tournament during 1989 and he finished the year ranked World No. 12.

Wilander briefly moved back into the top 10 rankings on 12 February 1990, but by the end of the year, his ranking had slumped to World No. 41. He defeated Boris Becker in the quarterfinals of the Australian Open, only to lose to Stefan Edberg in straight sets in the semifinals. He skipped the French Open and Wimbledon and lost in the first round of the US Open to Brad Gilbert.

Wilander played only the first half of 1991. He lost in the fourth round of the Australian Open and the second round of the French Open. He finished the year ranked World No. 159.

Wilander was absent from the tour in 1992. He played seven tournaments in 1993, losing in the first round of five of them. At the US Open, he lost in the third round to Cédric Pioline. He finished the year ranked World No. 330.

Except for Wimbledon, Wilander played a full schedule in 1994. He lost in the fourth round of the Australian Open to MaliVai Washington, the first round of the French Open to Andre Agassi (6–2, 7–5, 6–1), and the first round of the US Open to Guy Forget. His only victory over a top ten player was in the second round of the tournament in Indianapolis against Todd Martin. He finished the year ranked World No. 129.

Wilander's results improved slightly in 1995 as he finished the year ranked World No. 46. After losing in the first round of the Australian Open to Jacco Eltingh, he lost in the second round of the French Open to eighth ranked Wayne Ferreira 6–7, 7–6, 6–3, 6–7, 8–6. He then lost in the third round of Wimbledon to Eltingh and the second round of the US Open to Martin. In other tournaments, he had wins against tenth ranked Marc Rosset, eighth ranked Ferreira, and sixth ranked Yevgeny Kafelnikov. He also won his final tour match against Edberg, in the second round of the Canadian Open in Montreal.

In 1996, Wilander played only one Grand Slam tournament, losing in the second round of the French Open to Martin. He retired from the tour after losing his final match to Martin Damm in Beijing in October.

During most of his career, Wilander used the Rossignol F-200 Carbon tennis racquet, an early fiberglass model.

Failed drug test and suspension
During the 1995 French Open he and Karel Nováček tested positive for cocaine. They appealed the initial three-month suspension by the International Tennis Federation, claiming flawed test procedures but withdrew their appeals in May 1997 and on 15 May 1997 received a three-month suspension from the ATP Tour for failing a drugs test. Additionally Wilander had to return his prize money since May 1995, amounting to $289,005, and forfeit ranking points.[6][7]
I didn't know Mats played in Paris this year. This might affect his 1995 ranking in hindsight 8-B
 

mxmx

Hall of Fame
Wilander has nailed it. Federer knew he was going to be well beaten (perhaps humiliated) if he made it through to Djokovic.

His withdrawal may well be the single most cowardly action by an ATG in the history of the slams.
Well...perhaps Willander is trolling, but my question is what would people have said if it wasn't Federer? What if he said this of someone less popular?
 

thrust

Hall of Fame
Mats Wilander has suggested that the possibility of a heavy defeat to Novak Djokovic was a factor in Roger Federer withdrawing from Roland Garros.

The seven-time Grand Slam champion also backed the Swiss’ decision to pull out, and said he saw that the 39-year-old “still has that fire inside of him”.
Federer defeated Dominik Koepfer in a gruelling third round Roland Garros match – before controversially withdrawing before facing Matteo Berrettini.

The world No. 8 would have faced Djokovic in the quarter-finals had he played and beaten the Italian.

“Yes, I think [he] made a good decision. I think he would have had options [to win] against Berrettini,” Wilander said in an interview with Punto de Break.

“But of course, then he could have met Djokovic and it could have been that the Serb had defeated him in a resounding way and, before Wimbledon – he did not want that.

“He came to Roland Garros, not with the idea of winning, but with the idea of playing several games. He must have earned more than he expected.

“But of course, what should he have done? Retiring when he had a match point? He has not played Rome, he has not played Madrid. He needed a victory! What he did is fine with me.

“He knew that, playing that long game [against Koepfer], there were options that he could not recover the next day, but he needed to win that game for his confidence.

“To be there, at midnight, on a cold night, with a heavy track, to do that. People have always seen Federer, but not everyone has realised what Federer has inside. He still has that fire inside of him.”
It is killing Federer that Nadal could become the all time slam leader this Sunday and that Djokovic has passed him in YE and weeks at #1. Why then would a near 40 year old, who has had an incredibly great career and is a multi millionaire try to win slams after two knee operations?
 

Devtennis01

Legend
Lol. Federer turns up to do his job, which was admittedly unpleasant, playing in those conditions at night, but a well rewarded job nonetheless and not quite going down the mines, and he has 'fire in his belly.' He was turning up for work! A third round versus a journeyman at 9pm on a Parisian late Spring evening, with someone to bring him towels and a nice massage after.
 

RaulRamirez

Hall of Fame
I don't care too much about Wilander's opinions (either way), and it's speculative that this was on Fed's mind. Indeed, Berrettini had a very good shot at beating him.

Some of my own takes:
It was admirable that Roger fought hard to beat Koepfer, And no, he should not have conceded the match to him. What did Koepfer do to deserve that gesture?
Injuries and playing through them are part of the game. Roger's record of answering the bell is quite impressive and he should get some leeway. At the same time, treating RG as one of his Wimbledon warm-ups just doesn't sit well with me. He transparently came there to get in a few matches -- and apparently, not more. That seems beneath his own standard and also the standard of one of the four majors. While he has seldom, if ever, withdrawn before, he did decide to sit out RG from 2016-18 (I didn't fault him) and also decided to not play the ATP Finals in 2014 to be in better shape for Davis Cup. Draw your own non-partisan conclusions.
 

Sunny014

Hall of Fame
Federer is 40 and of course he doesn't want a loss to Djokovic on the wrong surface.

Of course .... Is that rocket science ?

Is that a bad thing? Wilander seems to be jealous of Fed yet again ...
 
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