Maybe Roddick Isnt a moron!

RoddickistheMan

Professional
Just read aan article on espn and like what I read. Finally roddick has started to realize his weaknesses.

Fighting for the game's most prestigious titles doesn't figure to be easy, but then again, Andy Roddick has never shied away from putting in what his Davis Cup captain Patrick McEnroe likes to call "the hard yards."

Gauging the future of America's best men's tennis player is a tough proposition. The contemporary tennis landscape is thick with competition. At 25, Roddick is a tennis veteran, if not exactly a statesman, certainly experienced enough to know how rough it is among the elite. Newly-crowned Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic is five years younger than Roddick. Others, such as the surprising Jo-Wilfried Tsonga and Roddick contemporaries David Ferrer and David Nalbandian, are potentially rough customers. Rafael Nadal is still only 21, and Roger Federer is but a year older than Roddick.

What's easier than predicting Roddick's prospects is to take a clinical look at the steps Roddick has taken, and see how his tools perhaps can position him for a run to the top of the game -- even in the wake of an earlier-than-expected exit from the Australian Open.

"I made a point of being in very good shape coming into the Australian Open this year, and I was," Roddick said last week in a conference call. "That being said, I think I might have relied too much on movement. Long story short, I should have let my forehand ride a little bit more. Kind of watching the tape [of his three matches in Melbourne], I realize that. I needed to kind of establish that shot in rallies a little bit more, maybe not let guys take control of it and take pot shots, make them a little bit more uncomfortable."

And yet in many ways, inside the lines Roddick is caught between a rock and a hard place as he tries to sort out his mix of offense and defense. Over the course of 18 months under the tutelage of Jimmy Connors, Roddick has worked to improve his backhand, frequently (but not constantly) attempted to take away time from his opponents and, as you'd expect most of all from a Connors client, compete with exceptional urgency.

But it's not easy to overhaul a game based on certain techniques -- particularly at the highest levels. While Roddick's serve and forehand do much to open up the court for him, his transition tools -- approach shots and volleys, as well as service returns -- do not often capitalize on his two big weapons. Knowing this, opponents often float back service returns, confident that Roddick will rarely serve and volley or effectively penetrate with his second shot. And when serving to Roddick, it's frequently comforting to know when spinning one to his backhand that he'll rarely take advantage of it and pound one with exceptional force.

Given Roddick's massive serve -- he won 91 percent of his service games last year, second on the tour -- he could well consider playing his return games as boldly as possibly. The mindset would be to take big cuts at returns, drive balls hard and deep, follow a few into the net -- in short: more or less take the racket out of the server's hands in the pursuit of one break to win the set. This was the approach Pete Sampras often took, a tactic Jim Courier called "pure offense."

Jimmy Connors

AP Photo/Rick Stevens

Jimmy Connors has attempted to instill a more potent backhand and aggressive net game into Roddick's arsenal.
But that style hasn't always suited Roddick. Like Connors, Roddick often prefers hitting a lot of balls to grind his way through a match. Word had it last month that instead Roddick was looking to rely on his fitness, movement and dogged focus to make opponents work as hard as possible on every point. Then again, Roddick himself noticed that in Australia he overemphasized movement at the expense of offense.

That early loss was a jolt for both Roddick and Connors. "He takes [the losses] rough also," said Roddick of his fiery coach. "I think it all hit us badly because we thought I was playing well enough to make a run there. The way the draw was, we liked the way it was going to shake out. I think we're all pretty upset with it. That being said, I think his biggest thing as far as coaching was, 'Don't let this discourage you. You put in a lot of hard work. You were very prepared here. Don't let this kind of get in your head and stop working.' He was calling me every day after Australia and really trying to push that point home."

The configuration of Roddick and his coaching staff is unusual. Roddick's brother John, a former All-American at the University of Georgia, is at heart the day-to-day coach, with Connors acting as senior consultant-guru.

Connors travels selectively. He was not present at last year's season-ending Tennis Masters Cup or the Davis Cup final. Connors won't be at this weekend's forthcoming Davis Cup tie, nor will he be in attendance when Roddick kicks off his North American season in San Jose, Calif., the week of Feb. 18.

"I think it's going to be more preparation-based this year," said Roddick. "I knew when we started working together that Jimmy is not going to come out of retirement and travel 35 weeks a year. That's just not something that he's going to do."

In large part, Roddick's days as tennis' crossover icon are in the past, going back to 2003 when he was No. 1 in the world and became only the second tennis player to host "Saturday Night Live." Instead, each morning he wakes up at 6:30 a.m. and grapples with the question every tennis player must answer: How do I get better? No one can anticipate the results -- but rest assured that Roddick will give it his all.
 
I still hate the guy....

But, with his serve and "work ethic", he will remain in the top ten for another few years. Plus, he can't get much better or bring much more to the table. :)
 

BeHappy

Hall of Fame
But, with his serve and "work ethic", he will remain in the top ten for another few years. Plus, he can't get much better or bring much more to the table. :)
maybe you missed this salient piece of info:
JThe configuration of Roddick and his coaching staff is unusual. Roddick's brother John, a former All-American at the University of Georgia, is at heart the day-to-day coach, with Connors acting as senior consultant-guru.
he deserves to lose.Throwing his career down the toilet.
 

Fee

Legend
I have no problem with John Roddick's credentials as a coach. He's more qualified than many other coaches out there. He was a good junior, and a decent/college pro prospect until his back injury, and he runs an academy that seems to be fairly popular. Not every coach has to be a former pro player (and not all former pro players make good coaches anyway).
 

BeHappy

Hall of Fame
I have no problem with John Roddick's credentials as a coach. He's more qualified than many other coaches out there. He was a good junior, and a decent/college pro prospect until his back injury, and he runs an academy that seems to be fairly popular. Not every coach has to be a former pro player (and not all former pro players make good coaches anyway).
1)His proficiency as a tennis player has dropped like a stone since he has employed his brother.
2)His technique on all his shots has atrophied to a level I have never seen before in a professional player, most obviously in his forehand, I have never seen such a transformation in a stroke before.We speak of How Ferrero's forehand is not the weapon it used to be, compared to Roddick, Ferrero is hitting his forehand like a cannon.This decline is not just limited to his forehand though.

3)He sems to have no idea what he is doing;The old Brad Gilbert maxim: who is doing what to whom?
Roddick is doing basic things wrong, things that, it's no exaggeration to say,
a club player would not do, ie:

a)approaching crosscourt

b)Hitting the ball very very short

c)Attempting to hit winners down the middle

d)positioning himself incorrectly
etc, etc




This can only be attributed to his brother coaching him...badly, I see no other explanation.His hiring his brother and completely losing his game is too much of a coincidence, I'm sorry Fee, but you have to admit it.


Why doesn't he just make his brother the towel boy like Blake does?
 

Fee

Legend
Sorry, but Andy's game started to fall apart a few years ago. Some say it actually started while he was still with Brad, others say it was while he was with Dean Goldfine because Dean was too laid back and didn't get in Andy's face enough.

The problems with Andy's game right now are not new. They are just being expolited more often than they used to be. Few players are afraid of Andy anymore, no matter what their ranking.
 

BeHappy

Hall of Fame
Sorry, but Andy's game started to fall apart a few years ago. Some say it actually started while he was still with Brad, others say it was while he was with Dean Goldfine because Dean was too laid back and didn't get in Andy's face enough.

The problems with Andy's game right now are not new. They are just being expolited more often than they used to be. Few players are afraid of Andy anymore, no matter what their ranking.

His game has gotten much much much much worse since december 2005.
 

NamRanger

G.O.A.T.
Sorry, but Andy's game started to fall apart a few years ago. Some say it actually started while he was still with Brad, others say it was while he was with Dean Goldfine because Dean was too laid back and didn't get in Andy's face enough.

The problems with Andy's game right now are not new. They are just being expolited more often than they used to be. Few players are afraid of Andy anymore, no matter what their ranking.

I'd have to disagree with you. With Dean Goldfine Roddick was doing ok, not the best he could have. But still consistent enough to stay in the top 10. With John Roddick as his sole and only coach, he was slumping everywhere. He practically forgot how to hit his forehand, his serve was going down the drain, and he literally had no backhand at all. During that small span where his brother was his primary coach, Andy Roddick fell out of the top 10 for the first time in forever. It was only due to his partnership with Jimmy Connors that saved his career, otherwise he'd probably be way down in the 50s with Karlovic right now.


Connors gave him some new tools for him to use, but he still can't get Andy to really attack with his forehand. He did for a small span at the U.S. Open, but then it just disappeared after that. Hopefully Jimmy can get Andy to hit his forehand with more authority.


And Andy Roddick of 2003 to late 2004 was a force to be reckoned with. He is not the same Andy Roddick as before. If he returns to his old power game, I can garuntee you that players will start to fear him again.
 

RoddickistheMan

Professional
And Andy Roddick of 2003 to late 2004 was a force to be reckoned with. He is not the same Andy Roddick as before. If he returns to his old power game, I can garuntee you that players will start to fear him again.

This is the roddick that can win grandslams and take out top 5 players with relative ease more so than today. I still have some hope that he can return to this form. Its not rocket scienve. Just hit the forehand harder and try to end points sooner.
 

msc886

Professional
Well its good that he knows his mistakes. footwork is important but he shouldn't compromise what was previously his strength.
 

Vision84

Hall of Fame
The difficulty is not for him realizing his mistakes but implementing them. When your playing a match and you have such quick decisions to do all the time, especially at such a high level its damn hard to fix it. He needs to have a lot of practice matches incorporating the right ways of thinking till it becomes more second nature. The feasibility of this though, I have absolutely no idea for him.

He may as well go back to his power game cause his defense is a big weakness so he needs to stay aggressive not letting his opponents getting into the points. He needs to stop trying to turn defense into attack as he isn't capable of doing this effectively at the top level. Nadal and Federer are both amazing at this but not Roddick.
 
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alienhamster

Hall of Fame
I agree with the article regarding his need to go for more on the returns. He doesn't have quite the reflexes of a Federer, but doesn't need to. If he can get a break, most of the time he will win a set.

He also needs to incorporate more variety on his first serve. I wish he'd take off the pace a bit more and throw in a change-up every once and a while, particularly against opponents who are using his pace to deflect the returns.

To his immense credit (and he never seems to get much on this board), where are Safin and Hewitt and Ferrero and all the other "New Balls" these days? At least Andy has kept close to Federer, remaining in the top 5 for the most part of the last 4-5 years. For someone with "so many weaknesses," that's a pretty good stat.
 
I agree with the article regarding his need to go for more on the returns. He doesn't have quite the reflexes of a Federer, but doesn't need to. If he can get a break, most of the time he will win a set.

He also needs to incorporate more variety on his first serve. I wish he'd take off the pace a bit more and throw in a change-up every once and a while, particularly against opponents who are using his pace to deflect the returns.

To his immense credit (and he never seems to get much on this board), where are Safin and Hewitt and Ferrero and all the other "New Balls" these days? At least Andy has kept close to Federer, remaining in the top 5 for the most part of the last 4-5 years. For someone with "so many weaknesses," that's a pretty good stat.
Hi,

I have agree and add to Andy's credit the guy has the heart of lion. I watched the entire match on Friday and was thinking he could have lost that match many times. He seemed so clueless at times but contunied to fight. He was playing on the road, on his worst surface and the surface
was a mess. He could have packed it in.. heck they just won the Davis Cup..but to his credit the guy is a warrior. He worked his butt off, played for 4 hrs and I think really helped take the pressure off of James in the next match. It allowed James to "free wheel" a bit and also showed James that he could win under less than perfect conditions. On friday.. I gave Andy credit two wins. BTW... I am guessing the guys get something from the USTA for playing... but it can't be much? Anyone know?

Dude.
 
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bluegrasser

Hall of Fame
I feel Andy busts his butt out there on the court, it's only a few players that keep him from some GS titles, but such is life.
 

my_forehand

Professional
For a second, I thought you hated Roddick...

And Andy Roddick of 2003 to late 2004 was a force to be reckoned with. He is not the same Andy Roddick as before. If he returns to his old power game, I can garuntee you that players will start to fear him again.

This is the roddick that can win grandslams and take out top 5 players with relative ease more so than today. I still have some hope that he can return to this form. Its not rocket scienve. Just hit the forehand harder and try to end points sooner.
...Until I read this post.

I think he can still do it, especially after reading the atricle. :)

Go Roddick!! :)
 

tintin

Professional
he is a fighter and doesn't give up easily but most players out there if not 99% of them don't have Roddick's serves but they focus on return of serves;movement;speed and variety so that they don't give the opponents the same look all the time.
This is were Roddick and his coaches all went wrong.

He wasn't born to be fast or a smooth mover like Federer.

Variety in his game should have been taught to him when he was just starting up not in his mid twenties and that's why he is struggling as much as he is these days.

ALL the players in the top 20 are Europeans and South Americans besides he,Blake and Hewitt grew up on clay and clay forces you to come up with plans B and C when plan A doesn't work during a rally so that you can outplay your opponent.These days they all play their clay games but they can and have made adjustments according to the surface they are playing on;example is the drop shot being hit on ALL surfaces now.Blake goes for his forehand as much as he can and when his serves are off and he gets broken and he can't hit his forehands he always loses;so no plan B.

I'm not sure he'll get faster or move better;don't think his net game will improve either since he doesn't play doubles and his defense to offense is sup-par.

players now are confident when facing him,bloke the serve;rally with him;keep him 3 feet behind the baseline and I'm good to go
 

NamRanger

G.O.A.T.
he is a fighter and doesn't give up easily but most players out there if not 99% of them don't have Roddick's serves but they focus on return of serves;movement;speed and variety so that they don't give the opponents the same look all the time.
This is were Roddick and his coaches all went wrong.

He wasn't born to be fast or a smooth mover like Federer.

Variety in his game should have been taught to him when he was just starting up not in his mid twenties and that's why he is struggling as much as he is these days.

ALL the players in the top 20 are Europeans and South Americans besides he,Blake and Hewitt grew up on clay and clay forces you to come up with plans B and C when plan A doesn't work during a rally so that you can outplay your opponent.These days they all play their clay games but they can and have made adjustments according to the surface they are playing on;example is the drop shot being hit on ALL surfaces now.Blake goes for his forehand as much as he can and when his serves are off and he gets broken and he can't hit his forehands he always loses;so no plan B.

I'm not sure he'll get faster or move better;don't think his net game will improve either since he doesn't play doubles and his defense to offense is sup-par.

players now are confident when facing him,bloke the serve;rally with him;keep him 3 feet behind the baseline and I'm good to go


In today's game, there really isn't a need for variety as evidenced by Novak Djokovic. Sure he CAN hit great volleys, dropshots, and crafty shots, but essentially his game is still centered around a big serve and hitting big flat shots from the back of the court, while running everything down.



Roddick can do the same, except before he hit even bigger off his forehand. When I mean big, it was probably one of the biggest inside out forehands in the game. Now he just ralleys with it with heavy spin. He needs to revert back to his old game to start winning anything. That's how his body is built.
 

samster

Legend
In today's game, there really isn't a need for variety as evidenced by Novak Djokovic. Sure he CAN hit great volleys, dropshots, and crafty shots, but essentially his game is still centered around a big serve and hitting big flat shots from the back of the court, while running everything down.



Roddick can do the same, except before he hit even bigger off his forehand. When I mean big, it was probably one of the biggest inside out forehands in the game. Now he just ralleys with it with heavy spin. He needs to revert back to his old game to start winning anything. That's how his body is built.
Roddick needs to flatten out his forehand and use it to dictate play.

See the old Roddick at his best:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2b8mXXvwQs
 

Netbudda

Rookie
I don't know why is so difficult for people to figure out the only reason Roddick likes Davis Cup so much is because it is pretty much the only thing we can really win until the top dogs decide to go after it....then he will have to settle for tier 2 events.
 

RoddickistheMan

Professional
when roddick was hitting his forehand the way he was back in 03-04 it was bigger than most of the players forehands today except maybe blakes and gonzos. It was definitely bigger than federers djokovics and ferrers.
 
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