Measuring strings?

C

ctong25

Guest
I just started stringing and i am used to the typical 40 ft of string and not having to do much measuring. Anyways does anybody know a technique to help measure out strings for the mains and the crosses without takinga measuring tape to it and cutting. Especially with the hybrid stringing now i just need an efficient way to get a general sense of how much string i will need
 

aidenous

Semi-Pro
You pretty much have to measure it. I happen to have a bookshelf right beside the stringer which is 36" and I use that. You could use your door it's either 30 or 36" or some other reference in the room. You will have to lookup the pattern to determine what length you will need for the mains and crosses.
 

eagle

Hall of Fame
Easy. Get a ruler and mark a 1 foot segment on your stringer.

Use that as a guide to measure each foot of string you need.

For one string method, measure 40 one foot segments. For two string method, measure two 20 one foot segments.

That's what I do. :)

Thanks,
eagle
 

theace21

Hall of Fame
I use the 6' foot method. 6' tall, arm span 6' - need 9', pull to arm span ( 6 '), extend arm to nose (3')...Have not missed yet.
 

AR15

Professional
I haven't strung a raquet that needed over 20 ft for the mains or the crosses. So, I find the middle of the 40ft and cut it into two 20 ft lengths. I find the middle by pulling the string around a doorknob while backing up with bothe ends in my hands.
 

SOY78

Professional
If you know how tall you are, when you put your arms out, like a bird from side to side, then the measurement between your hands is the same as your height. That is what I do.
 

Jack the Hack

Hall of Fame
I use two methods:

If I have a regular 40 foot set, I just uncoil the whole thing and cut it in half at the middle. I use hybrids exclusively, so this leaves me a half set for the current string job and a half set for a future one.

If I am using a reel, I have a yard stick that I lay out on the ground next to the reel and I just pull what I need in approximate 3' increments.
 

rasajadad

Hall of Fame
My method is to measure against the room I use. I measured from a latch on the far wall across the room to a 20' mark. Then when I measure off a reel, I clip one end of the string to the latch with a clamp and then walk the reel across the room.

When I am measuring off a set, I loop the string through the latch. Hopefully, I get two equal 20' pieces. For unequal lengths, I just measure the difference.
 

Jonny S&V

Hall of Fame
I just started stringing and i am used to the typical 40 ft of string and not having to do much measuring. Anyways does anybody know a technique to help measure out strings for the mains and the crosses without takinga measuring tape to it and cutting. Especially with the hybrid stringing now i just need an efficient way to get a general sense of how much string i will need

Measure a piece of string about 20 feet. Mark it so that you know like 16-20 feet. This way you can measure the string accurately every time.
 

tennis78610

New User
Measure By String

Its prob not the best way to measure but i just put the mids through the middle and count out 10 feet as im holding the other side. Its easy and in still have slack after im done with the mids......
 

tennis78610

New User
Measure By String

Its prob not the best way to measure but i just put the mids through the middle and count out 10 feet as im holding the other side. Its easy and i still have slack after im done with the mids......
 

mclee025

Rookie
I just started stringing and i am used to the typical 40 ft of string and not having to do much measuring. Anyways does anybody know a technique to help measure out strings for the mains and the crosses without takinga measuring tape to it and cutting. Especially with the hybrid stringing now i just need an efficient way to get a general sense of how much string i will need

If you are using a reel and you want to get the most out of your reel and minimize wasted string, you can do the following: find out how many mains are on the racquet and then pull that many measurements across the longest main on the racquet and then add an extra pull. So if you have 18 mains, pull 19. That should give you enough string with enough slack to pull tension and make the tie off. Different string machines will need different amounts of slack, so adjust accordingly for your machine (on my machine I'll only generally need about 18.5 pulls in our example). Do the same for the crosses.

If you plan to string the same racquet a lot, it's good to convert this to a concrete measurement that you document. For example, I'll convert the number of pulls to a length measurment that I have marked on a hallway that I can quickly pull from a reel from a door knob I use to prestretch the string.
 

psp2

Banned
If you are using a reel and you want to get the most out of your reel and minimize wasted string, you can do the following: find out how many mains are on the racquet and then pull that many measurements across the longest main on the racquet and then add an extra pull. So if you have 18 mains, pull 19. That should give you enough string with enough slack to pull tension and make the tie off. Different string machines will need different amounts of slack, so adjust accordingly for your machine (on my machine I'll only generally need about 18.5 pulls in our example). Do the same for the crosses.

If you plan to string the same racquet a lot, it's good to convert this to a concrete measurement that you document. For example, I'll convert the number of pulls to a length measurment that I have marked on a hallway that I can quickly pull from a reel from a door knob I use to prestretch the string.

^^ very good suggestion.

I keep a small notepad with various string pull measurements for many of the racquets I string (for myself and friends).

For example, I can easily string my PS85 with 7 racquet-length pull for the main and 6.5 racquet-length pull for the crosses.

These main/cross string lengths allows me to minimize wasted string from a reel. I can usually get at least 2 more stringing from a reel with my method.
 

Loco4Tennis

Hall of Fame
i measured my arm reach from hand to hand one time, and now i just use that for my basic measuring, works great and fast, 20' sets no problem, making sure there is 660' in the reel, very time consuming,,,,just kidding,, i did not measure the whole 660', fell asleep before i got to the end, i dreamed that night about 16 gauge tennis string coming after me :)
 

tbini87

Hall of Fame
i personally like the outstretched arm method. not precise, but fast and fairly accurate. be sure to miss long instead of coming up short.
 

mrw

Semi-Pro
Another vote for outstretched arms.

Get a tape measure, spread your arms wide and remember the measurement.
there you go.
 
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