Men's tennis TV audience is the second oldest in professional sports

Otacon

Hall of Fame
Study: Nearly all sports see quick rise in average age of TV viewers in the US as younger fans shift to digital platforms (Published June 5, 2017)

According to a striking study of Nielsen television viewership data of 24 sports, all but one have seen the median age of their TV viewers increase during the past decade.

The study conducted looked at live, regular-season game coverage of major sports across both broadcast and cable television in 2000, 2006 and 2016. It showed that while the median age of viewers of most sports, except the WTA, NBA and MLS, is aging faster than the overall U.S. population, it is doing so at a slower pace than prime-time TV.



The trends show the challenges facing men's tennis as ATP officials try to attract a younger audience and ensure long-term viability, and they reflect the changes in consumption patterns as young people shift their attention to digital platforms.

ATP chief Chris Kermode recognized there is a shift from traditional broadcasting and is eager to make sure the game doesn’t fall behind in appealing to its fans.

“It’s an area we are looking at,” he said. “People are consuming entertainment products is changing ever so dramatically and destination TV is changing.”

“I think we need to be looking ahead rather than sticking with the traditional channels. Obviously, it’s a bit of a risk as its only early days. But it’s definitely the way coverage is heading.”

“There is an increased interest in short-term things, like stats and quick highlights,” said Brian Hughes, senior vice president of audience intelligence and strategy at Magna Global USA. “That availability of information has naturally funneled some younger viewers away from TV.”

Jeramie McPeek, former longtime digital media executive for the Phoenix Suns who now runs Jeramie McPeek Communications, a social media consultancy, also cited the movement of younger consumers to digital platforms.

“It is smartphone and tablet usage by younger people who are on Snapchat or Instagram all day long and watching a lot of videos on YouTube and Netflix,” McPeek said. “Rarely are they watching TV and they are on their device constantly where they can watch videos on demand.”

None of the properties contacted contested the data, but most pointed to digital consumption among younger viewers, which was not included in the study and is growing rapidly. Some leagues, such as MLS, the NBA and WTA, will be bullish about the data while others such as the PGA Tour will continue to address the long-term viewership narrative around their sport.

Soccer skews the youngest on television, with a median age of 40 for MLS viewers in 2016, up from 39 in 2006. The PGA Tour skews the oldest, as the average age of its television viewers climbed from 59 in 2006 to 64 in 2016.



The average age of an American men's tennis viewer is 61, up from 56 in 2006. There won’t be a youth movement, either, as just 4% of ATP audience is below age 18.

In one way, men's tennis is in great company. Of the 24 professional sports that the SBJ and Magna looked at, all but women’s tennis has seen the average age of viewers increase. On the other hand, the only sport with an average age higher than men's tennis is golf (64). They’re also the only sports drawing fewer young people, with the under-18 crowd ranging from 4% for men’s tennis to a dismal 3% for golf.

Regardless of the property, the numbers highlight why so many sports properties feel a sense of urgency to attract younger fans.

“There are now so many different ways to engage with properties, and people are getting highlights whenever they want,” said Doug Perlman, chief executive officer of Sports Media Advisors. “People have to question whether younger viewers are less inclined to watch or less inclined to watch as long.”

Ty Votaw, executive vice president of global business affairs of the PGA Tour, summed up the tour’s demographics: “While we may be older, our demographics have been of considerable higher quality than other sports and we have aged considerably slower.”

Votaw also noted that audience trends today can’t be solely focused on the linear TV viewer and pointed to a younger audience on tour-run digital properties.

“When you go to PGATour.com, the median age is 55 and for our PGATour Live (over-the-top network), the median age is 20 years younger than on broadcast,” he said.

On the other end of the spectrum, MLS credits its younger average age to the game itself and its multicultural reach. Fifteen percent of its fan base is under the age of 18, the highest such rate of the U.S.-based leagues (see charts).

“It is the coming of age of our league and the connection we have with multicultural millennials and with people who grew up with soccer as their first participatory activity,” said Howard Handler, chief marketing officer of MLS, which counts ESPN, Fox and Univision as the league’s TV partners. “If you get into bigger trends, our game is a two-hour experience that isn’t broken up by a bunch of TV timeouts. We consider our TV deals to be progressive. We are the only league that has an exclusive Hispanic game of the week. Yes, we have a young demographic, but we have a lot more work to do. We are still driving scale.”

The NBA has the next-youngest TV viewership with a median age of 42, up from 40 in both 2000 and 2006.

“The youthfulness you see in the NBA is by design,” said Pam El, the league’s chief marketing officer. “Children start playing basketball at a young age and we have a strong youth program. Our players are pop-star icons and have strong appeal to young people. They have huge followings and young people follow young people. But you don’t just want millennials. You want to continue to keep viewers in all age groups.”

Like other leagues, the NBA has seen a strong uptick in digital consumption.



“We know that people are going to consume our content differently, not just through broadcast or on one device,” El said. “We know how millennials consume content and we have developed our offerings to meet that demand. You go where they go and you will attract fans in that age group.”



The WTA is the sole property studied to buck the trend toward older TV viewers. In 2016, the WTA’s median age TV viewer decreased to 55, down eight years from 2006. It was the only property that saw a drop in the median age of its TV viewers during the past decade.

WTA President Micky Lawler said that the increased social media participation by WTA players and the growth in the WTA’s OTT and digital offerings have attracted younger viewers to television.

“Our digital platform drives people to the linear live matches,” Lawler said. “We need to get to 35. We have a ways to go.”

While the study shows the progression toward older TV viewership in sports, it does not address any specific changes in the number of sports television viewers for any particular property. However, Magna data reveals that in 2016 the majority of properties saw an increase in the number of televised hours compared to 2006. For example, approximately 354 hours of live MLS action aired nationally last year, up tenfold compared to a decade prior. Only boxing and the PGA Tour Champions saw their number of TV hours decline between those two years.

Source : Magna Global
 

Pete Player

Hall of Fame
On all the charts it says ”median”. Yet that also give you trend information, it is not the average, if usd in proper manner.

From my own perspective, a 50-yo view, it is all more towards the digital streaming services, different players of the traditional broadcasting companies and tour highlights on their pages, Youtube more than TV. The freedom to watch when ever, where ever is a value also for the elder people nowadays. Mobile network is covering our summer/winter cottages and you can download broadcast to be watched even without the connection.

The millenial defenately have different consumer profile, than us, but as said, we can still learn and lean towards the more mobile and agile way of watching our desired proadcasts and downloads.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 

Zoolander

Hall of Fame
Please dont let them use this as another excuse to "dumbify" tennis with more furious fast 4's with crap rules just to attract brain dead younger teens who care more about how many other teens with no lives like their idiotic selfie on facepage than actually playing or watching a real sport.....
 

Antonio Puente

Hall of Fame
Please dont let them use this as another excuse to "dumbify" tennis with more furious fast 4's with crap rules just to attract brain dead younger teens who care more about how many other teens with no lives like their idiotic selfie on facepage than actually playing or watching a real sport.....
Don't worry, American tennis will, in a way, be subsidized by the European and international markets. I doubt European and international youth numbers look that bad, leading to drastic changes.
 

accidental

Hall of Fame
I hardly ever actually watch matches. I watch matches I'm interested in at the grand slams, and watch a lot of tennis during the Australian season.

Otherwise the vast majority live games are always at an inconvenient time for me and I don't have access to anything that shows games live, so I just watch a lot of highlights and read stuff on the internet
 

marc45

G.O.A.T.
there's this still...

Gaspar Ribeiro Lança‏ @gasparlanca 24h24 hours ago
Most Googled sports events of the year:

1. WIMBLEDON

2. Super Bowl

3. Mayweather vs. McGregor Fight

4. Tour de France

5. World Series (baseball)

6. AUSTRALIAN OPEN

7. US OPEN

8. Confederations Cup

9. NBA playoffs

10 UEFA Champions League

......

congrats to Federer on Wimbledon, and to Nadal for being so dominant at RG people no longer need any new info about it :)

........

full article below
 
Last edited:
C

Chadillac

Guest
there's this still...

Gaspar Ribeiro Lança‏ @gasparlanca 24h24 hours ago
Most Googled sports events of the year:

1. WIMBLEDON

2. Super Bowl

3. Mayweather vs. McGregor Fight

4. Tour de France

5. World Series (baseball)

6. AUSTRALIAN OPEN

7. US OPEN

8. Confederations Cup

9. NBA playoffs

10 UEFA Champions League

......

congrats to Federer on Wimbledon, and to Nadal for being so dominant at RG people no longer need any new info about it :)
Hard to believe 3 grand slams are in the top 10. No surprise the french didnt make the list
 

MeatTornado

G.O.A.T.
there's this still...

Gaspar Ribeiro Lança‏ @gasparlanca 24h24 hours ago
Most Googled sports events of the year:

1. WIMBLEDON

2. Super Bowl

3. Mayweather vs. McGregor Fight

4. Tour de France

5. World Series (baseball)

6. AUSTRALIAN OPEN

7. US OPEN

8. Confederations Cup

9. NBA playoffs

10 UEFA Champions League

......

congrats to Federer on Wimbledon, and to Nadal for being so dominant at RG people no longer need any new info about it :)
I feel like there has to be a catch. Idk how a tennis event could possibly beat out the Super Bowl.
 

marc45

G.O.A.T.
here's a full article with pics.....not stats or methodology though

Business Insider:

Google reveals the 10 most popular sporting events in worldwide searches during 2017
  • Dec. 13, 2017






  • 10. UEFA Champions League

    Laurence Griffiths/Getty

  • The 2016-17 Champions League culminated with a heavily hyped showdown between Real Madrid and Juventus, and while Juve controlled the game in the early going, they were no match for Cristiano Ronaldo. The 32-year-old legend scored a pair of goals, leading Real to its third Champions League title in four years. This season, just 16 teams remain alive.

    9. NBA Playoffs

    Ronald Martinez/Getty

  • Stretched out over almost two months, it's no surprise that the NBA's postseason games were some of the most heavily searched sporting events of the year. The third edition of the Warriors and Cavaliers' fight for dominance in the Finals was the main event, but between the Spurs, Rockets, and Celtics, there was plenty of other action to get excited about.

    8. FIFA Confederations Cup

    Dean Mouhtaropoulos/Getty

  • Three years after securing the World Cup, Germany made things twice as nice by winning their first Confederations Cup. They faced Chile in the final, coming out on top in the tense 1-0 match thanks to a goal by Lars Stindl.

    7. US Open

    Chris Trotman/Getty

  • While the NBA and MLB continued rapid evolutions in 2017, tennis seemed to turn back the clock by about 10 years. Nadal has been ravaged by injuries in recent seasons, but he stayed healthy enough to win two majors this year, including the U.S. Open. It was his third title in Arthur Ashe Stadium, giving him 16 Grand Slams for his career. On the women's side, Sloane Stephens emerged from an all-American semifinal to win her first Slam.

    6. Australian Open

    Scott Barbour/Getty

  • Serena Williams came out on top in the women's draw, her final event of the year before announcing her pregnancy. She went the entire tournament without dropping a set, defeating her sister Venus by score of 6-4, 6-4 in the final. On the men's side, it was Roger Federer who delivered a vintage performance, claiming his 18th major title to start his year off with a bang.

    5. World Series

    Harry How/Getty

  • The 2017 World Series was an instant classic, complete with extra-inning games, huge home runs, and one satisfying finish. The Astros and Dodgers proved to be well-matched, but it was the former team that came out on top, cruising to a 5-1 victory in Game 7. In the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, the city of Houston finally got something to smile about.

    4. Tour de France

    Chris Garythen/Getty

  • Covering 2,200 miles through France and Germany, the Tour de France provides a perfect combination of spectacular views and athletic competition. Chris Froome didn't win any one stage of the 2017 edition, but he was still the fastest man in the field by 54 seconds, giving him his fourth title in the past five years.

    3. Mayweather vs McGregor Fight

    Christian Petersen/Getty Images

  • Many boxing fans will tell you that this was a disappointing fight — and it didn't matter for a second. As two of the foremost trash-talkers in the history of combat sports, Mayweather and McGregor were going to put on a show no matter what, and they delivered with a public feud that sparked almost as many eye rolls as Google searches. On fight night, Mayweather took control, winning by TKO in the 10th round.

    2. Super Bowl

    Mike Ehrmann/Getty

  • The New England Patriots' epic 25-point comeback made Super Bowl LI one of the best in history, but that wasn't the only storyline to get excited about. Between the Falcons' quest to win their first championship, Lady Gaga's moving halftime show performance, and a fresh wave of hilarious commercials, this event had something for everyone.

    1. Wimbledon

    Clive Brunskill/Getty

  • It's not a big surprise to see this king of tennis tournaments top the list, especially given the result in the men's draw. Roger Federer cruised to his record-breaking eighth Wimbledon title, becoming the first man in the open era to win the event without dropping a set since Bjorn Borg in 1976. On the women's side, Spain's Garbine Muguruza won the second Grand Slam title of her career.
 

Gary Duane

G.O.A.T.
I don't like watching things on tablets. I like large screens. But otherwise my viewing habits are more like much younger people. I never watch anything live on tennis except now and then, when I happen to be up and its convenient.

I want to see things when I want to see them. Anything on "regular TV", which is mostly cable, I set up, record, watch when I feel like it. Never watch commercials. Lots of Netflix. Don't do "on demand" when it means paying extra money.

Even when watching news, always recorded so to skip ads I'm always on my tablet at the same time, doing things in the background.
 

Backspin1183

G.O.A.T.
there's this still...

Gaspar Ribeiro Lança‏ @gasparlanca 24h24 hours ago
Most Googled sports events of the year:

1. WIMBLEDON

2. Super Bowl

3. Mayweather vs. McGregor Fight

4. Tour de France

5. World Series (baseball)

6. AUSTRALIAN OPEN

7. US OPEN

8. Confederations Cup

9. NBA playoffs

10 UEFA Champions League

......

congrats to Federer on Wimbledon, and to Nadal for being so dominant at RG people no longer need any new info about it :)

........

full article below
I'm not sure Champions League would be lower than 3 of tennis Grand slam tournaments. Is this data the most Googled sports in the world or by Americans?
 

marc45

G.O.A.T.
I'm not sure Champions League would be lower than 3 of tennis Grand slam tournaments. Is this data the most Googled sports in the world or by Americans?
have been trying to find some more data, seems like they've done it U.S. and world-wide

btw, here's a big general interest "searches of the year" article that they put out, sports was just part of it

http://boston.cbslocal.com/2017/12/14/most-googled-searches-2017/ (full article)

Google Reveals The ‘Most Googled’ Topics Of 2017

December 14, 2017

intro:

CBS Local —
One of the biggest storms to strike the U.S. in history is also entering the record books as the most searched topic on Google in 2017.

Hurricane Irma, the category 5 storm which battered Florida and the Caribbean in September, was the “most Googled” search term in the U.S. and around the world this year.

Matt Lauer, the former Today show host fired over sexual harassment allegations, was the second-most frequently entered search among Americans in 2017. Legendary singer and musician Tom Petty, who passed away on Oct. 2, finished third on Google’s list.

Here are some of the other terms, popular questions, and people Google says had the highest sustained spike in traffic in the United States and globally this year:
 
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King No1e

G.O.A.T.
Please dont let them use this as another excuse to "dumbify" tennis with more furious fast 4's with crap rules just to attract brain dead younger teens who care more about how many other teens with no lives like their idiotic selfie on facepage than actually playing or watching a real sport.....
Why does this ring so true????
 

gogo

Legend
Tennis has a "TV problem" because it isn't shown at consistent times, readily available to watch live in the evenings and on weekends. It's a global sport with global hours. The tournaments, by necessity, have match play at all times of day. As well, there isn't one broadcaster that broadcasts the sport. You have one broadcaster with rights to M1000's and another to the Slams. Heaven forbid you want to watch matches in the early rounds that don't involve Fedal.

Therefore it is naturally more conducive to watch tennis online.
 

Pete Player

Hall of Fame
If you think, how many make their way to the elite and how many money is involved. A league player in team sports may make a million on his first year as a professional. That is not common in sport like tennis, where you get struck out when losing one and the fact that singles sports is all about only yourself making it, I think may have the young become more intrested in team sports, where you will have like an idol and local heroes in every village. And may even go see a match live in the regular season for 20 bucks near your home.


——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 

octobrina10

Talk Tennis Guru
there's this still...

Gaspar Ribeiro Lança‏ @gasparlanca 24h24 hours ago
Most Googled sports events of the year:

1. WIMBLEDON

2. Super Bowl

3. Mayweather vs. McGregor Fight

4. Tour de France

5. World Series (baseball)

6. AUSTRALIAN OPEN

7. US OPEN

8. Confederations Cup

9. NBA playoffs

10 UEFA Champions League

......

congrats to Federer on Wimbledon, and to Nadal for being so dominant at RG people no longer need any new info about it :)

........

full article below
You are correct, I don't need Google to get information about the French Open. Nowadays, journalists/reporters are immediately tweeting about what happens in the tennis world.
 

Phoenix1983

G.O.A.T.
This is a bit misleading.

I've attended several tennis tournaments, and the average age is well below the 61 quoted here.

Therefore I think the "average age watching on TV" is rather meaningless when trying to guage the full picture.
 
D

Deleted member 733170

Guest
Are we the second oldest poasters on the internet?
 
D

Deleted member 743561

Guest
This is a bit misleading.

I've attended several tennis tournaments, and the average age is well below the 61 quoted here.

Therefore I think the "average age watching on TV" is rather meaningless when trying to guage the full picture.
Quick scan of the June article provided by the OP, and it looks like this is about technology usage more than sports fandom.

At any rate, what's OP's agenda? And which former user is he/she?
 

Bluefan75

Professional
This almost reads like a solution in search of a problem. Sure younger people are watching on phones/tablets. Good for them.

Those of us who are older and have a bit of money(which is who advertisers are trying to reach) will watch TV, or watch it however we want.

Sounds like someone "knows how things will go in the future", and put together some data in order to sell their services. And if these leagues/organizations are like many companies I have seen, there will be a crapton of money wasted on consultants who have the next great thing in their hands. All for the low, low price of.....
 

TheGhostOfAgassi

Talk Tennis Guru

chut

Professional
It's about USA only. There are almost no top US players at the moment, so it's not exactly surprising that it doesn't attract young viewers.
 

Pete Player

Hall of Fame
The intrest of tennis would go up, if a (Young) Senior would not win tourneys. Nole as well is in the old guard. 10 - 15...20 years of the same four fabulous players of all time having a ball at the top of rankings will defenately dull it for the young, who are not playing.

They’ve been like owning the damn ATP Tour for more than a decade. It has no value. It should be forbidden to attend, if you’re over 35 and go to seniors tour or what ever Legends it would be.

——————————
On pain meds - all contributed matter and anti-matter subject to disclaimer
 

dthienem

New User
This is a scary reality for the sport of tennis, but American viewership has been an issue since the 90's. I'm hoping the guys over at Cracked Racquets can bring some fresh energy, new takes, and a wider audience to tennis as a whole!
 
Is this the right place to say that I don't think that tennis need to "advertise" itself to reach anybody?

I mean, the younger generations can go to hell, if someone needs to convince them to participate.

And I am going to watch tennis whichever way I please, thank you very much.

:cool:
 

Simon_the_furry

Hall of Fame
Study: Nearly all sports see quick rise in average age of TV viewers in the US as younger fans shift to digital platforms (Published June 5, 2017)

According to a striking study of Nielsen television viewership data of 24 sports, all but one have seen the median age of their TV viewers increase during the past decade.

The study conducted looked at live, regular-season game coverage of major sports across both broadcast and cable television in 2000, 2006 and 2016. It showed that while the median age of viewers of most sports, except the WTA, NBA and MLS, is aging faster than the overall U.S. population, it is doing so at a slower pace than prime-time TV.



The trends show the challenges facing men's tennis as ATP officials try to attract a younger audience and ensure long-term viability, and they reflect the changes in consumption patterns as young people shift their attention to digital platforms.

ATP chief Chris Kermode recognized there is a shift from traditional broadcasting and is eager to make sure the game doesn’t fall behind in appealing to its fans.

“It’s an area we are looking at,” he said. “People are consuming entertainment products is changing ever so dramatically and destination TV is changing.”

“I think we need to be looking ahead rather than sticking with the traditional channels. Obviously, it’s a bit of a risk as its only early days. But it’s definitely the way coverage is heading.”

“There is an increased interest in short-term things, like stats and quick highlights,” said Brian Hughes, senior vice president of audience intelligence and strategy at Magna Global USA. “That availability of information has naturally funneled some younger viewers away from TV.”

Jeramie McPeek, former longtime digital media executive for the Phoenix Suns who now runs Jeramie McPeek Communications, a social media consultancy, also cited the movement of younger consumers to digital platforms.

“It is smartphone and tablet usage by younger people who are on Snapchat or Instagram all day long and watching a lot of videos on YouTube and Netflix,” McPeek said. “Rarely are they watching TV and they are on their device constantly where they can watch videos on demand.”

None of the properties contacted contested the data, but most pointed to digital consumption among younger viewers, which was not included in the study and is growing rapidly. Some leagues, such as MLS, the NBA and WTA, will be bullish about the data while others such as the PGA Tour will continue to address the long-term viewership narrative around their sport.

Soccer skews the youngest on television, with a median age of 40 for MLS viewers in 2016, up from 39 in 2006. The PGA Tour skews the oldest, as the average age of its television viewers climbed from 59 in 2006 to 64 in 2016.



The average age of an American men's tennis viewer is 61, up from 56 in 2006. There won’t be a youth movement, either, as just 4% of ATP audience is below age 18.

In one way, men's tennis is in great company. Of the 24 professional sports that the SBJ and Magna looked at, all but women’s tennis has seen the average age of viewers increase. On the other hand, the only sport with an average age higher than men's tennis is golf (64). They’re also the only sports drawing fewer young people, with the under-18 crowd ranging from 4% for men’s tennis to a dismal 3% for golf.

Regardless of the property, the numbers highlight why so many sports properties feel a sense of urgency to attract younger fans.

“There are now so many different ways to engage with properties, and people are getting highlights whenever they want,” said Doug Perlman, chief executive officer of Sports Media Advisors. “People have to question whether younger viewers are less inclined to watch or less inclined to watch as long.”

Ty Votaw, executive vice president of global business affairs of the PGA Tour, summed up the tour’s demographics: “While we may be older, our demographics have been of considerable higher quality than other sports and we have aged considerably slower.”

Votaw also noted that audience trends today can’t be solely focused on the linear TV viewer and pointed to a younger audience on tour-run digital properties.

“When you go to PGATour.com, the median age is 55 and for our PGATour Live (over-the-top network), the median age is 20 years younger than on broadcast,” he said.

On the other end of the spectrum, MLS credits its younger average age to the game itself and its multicultural reach. Fifteen percent of its fan base is under the age of 18, the highest such rate of the U.S.-based leagues (see charts).

“It is the coming of age of our league and the connection we have with multicultural millennials and with people who grew up with soccer as their first participatory activity,” said Howard Handler, chief marketing officer of MLS, which counts ESPN, Fox and Univision as the league’s TV partners. “If you get into bigger trends, our game is a two-hour experience that isn’t broken up by a bunch of TV timeouts. We consider our TV deals to be progressive. We are the only league that has an exclusive Hispanic game of the week. Yes, we have a young demographic, but we have a lot more work to do. We are still driving scale.”

The NBA has the next-youngest TV viewership with a median age of 42, up from 40 in both 2000 and 2006.

“The youthfulness you see in the NBA is by design,” said Pam El, the league’s chief marketing officer. “Children start playing basketball at a young age and we have a strong youth program. Our players are pop-star icons and have strong appeal to young people. They have huge followings and young people follow young people. But you don’t just want millennials. You want to continue to keep viewers in all age groups.”

Like other leagues, the NBA has seen a strong uptick in digital consumption.



“We know that people are going to consume our content differently, not just through broadcast or on one device,” El said. “We know how millennials consume content and we have developed our offerings to meet that demand. You go where they go and you will attract fans in that age group.”



The WTA is the sole property studied to buck the trend toward older TV viewers. In 2016, the WTA’s median age TV viewer decreased to 55, down eight years from 2006. It was the only property that saw a drop in the median age of its TV viewers during the past decade.

WTA President Micky Lawler said that the increased social media participation by WTA players and the growth in the WTA’s OTT and digital offerings have attracted younger viewers to television.

“Our digital platform drives people to the linear live matches,” Lawler said. “We need to get to 35. We have a ways to go.”

While the study shows the progression toward older TV viewership in sports, it does not address any specific changes in the number of sports television viewers for any particular property. However, Magna data reveals that in 2016 the majority of properties saw an increase in the number of televised hours compared to 2006. For example, approximately 354 hours of live MLS action aired nationally last year, up tenfold compared to a decade prior. Only boxing and the PGA Tour Champions saw their number of TV hours decline between those two years.

Source : Magna Global
THIS IS WHY WE NEED KYRGIOS.
Tennis needs personality. It's seen as stuffy and overly polite. People like Nick Kyrgios, Dustin Brown, Viktor Troicki, and Andy Murray have to come in and save the sport from what it was. The problem is, tennis players are seen as players, and not people.

We need a LeBron James, a Dale Earnhardt Jr., a Conor McGregor, or a Usain Bolt, but for tennis.


Look at LeBron. He has a brand. He is elite, and he dominates. People see how LeBron plays and they think "Damn, that's awesome. This dude's on another level. I wanna play like that." There's no other LeBron.

Look at Dale Earnhardt Jr. He is the everyman. If you saw him in normal clothes and not a racing suit, you'd think he might be a landscaper, or a summer camp counselor, or a manager at Bass Pro Shops or something. He has a southern drawl and a humble way of conducting himself. People see him and think "Damn, this dude is like anyone else. He's like ." And they look at Dale Jr. and they get inspiration from his unassuming behavior.

You look at Conor, and he's basically the LeBron of MMA.

You look at Usain, and he makes people look like fools when they try to pose a challenge. There's many photos out there of Usain just running with a casual smile and his opponents look like they're literally dying.

 
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